Alphabet Letter Hunt Activities – Three Variations

One night after taking a bath, my son suggested an activity/game for the next day called, Letter Hunt. I was intrigued by his suggestion and asked him how to play. Cory said “We will find all the letters in the alphabet in one room.”

The next day, we played the game he suggested and had a blast. We also played two other variations of the game. This activity is great for letter recognition and it allows children to get physical. Play this game even if your child knows their letters.

My son is very familiar with the alphabet but still had fun with this activity. It was raining outside when we played the game and that resulted in perfect timing.

Let’s Get Started

Letter Hunt- Variation 1

Materials:

  • Children and adults

Directions:

  • Tell your child you will do a letter hunt by going around a room or your home to search for letters.
  • You may find letters anywhere in your home such as magazines, signs, toys, shoes, books etc.
  • Keep playing the game until you find letters A-Z
My son found the letter A on his Paw Patrol Slipper.
Found the letter C on a box.

Letter Hunt – Variation 2

Materials:

  • Foam Letter or Magnetic letters
  • You may also use letters you have written on paper

Directions:

  • Hide letters A-Z around a room
  • Have your child(ren) find the letters and put them in a pile.
My son hunting for the letters I hid.

Letter Hunt – Variation 3

Materials:

  • Markers
  • Craft Paper or Poster Board Paper
  • Foam letters or Magnetic letters
  • You may also use letters you have written on paper

Directions:

  • Draw a chart on craft paper with your name or initial on one column and your child’s name or initial in the another column.
  • You and your child will get two different letters.
    • For example, your child will get letter A and you will get letter B.
Cory picking the letter he will soon hide.
  • Have your child hide the letter A in a room without you looking.
  • You hide the letter B in a room and ensure your child is not looking at where you are hiding it.
  • Now both of you go find the letters each one of you hid.
    • For example, you will find the letter A and your child will find the letter B
  • Whoever finds the letter first wins a point that round.
  • Have your child record the points on craft paper for each round.
Keeping score for our Letter Hunt. Clearly I am losing the game.
I am trying to find where Cory hid his letter. He had great hiding spots.


Have Fun Playing and Learning!

Don’t forget to check our two books, Teach your Toddler to Read Through Play and Fun and Easy Ways to Teach your Toddler to Write.

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Fun and Easy Ways to Teach Your Child to Write

Many parents ask me how my son started writing at such a young age. He wrote his first letter A at 21 months. He could also write the alphabet and numbers 1-100 at the age of 2.5.

My son writing numbers 1-100 outside at 2.5 years old.
Here’s a video of my son, age 2 at the time, writing the alphabet outside.

Teaching a child to write can be a difficult task, especially if the child does not have a desire to learn. Below I will answer the most frequently asked questions when it comes to handwriting skills and children. You will find creative and enjoyable teaching techniques in my new book, Fun and Easy Ways to Teach Your Toddler to Write.

It has over 135 activities, resources and tips for teaching writing with PLAY.

The Book is Available on Amazon in Paperback and Kindle! Click on the Image Below to Find It.

GO TO THE BOTTOM OF THIS POST TO GET THE FIRST CHAPTER AND HALF OF THE SECOND CHAPTER FOR FREE.

Let’s Get Started!

How Can I Help with Writing?

Part of learning to write involves remembering how letters, shapes, and numbers are formed. Most children are taught this through tracing letters, numbers, lines, and shapes repeatedly. Although this is very effective, there are other scientific-proven tricks that can accelerate the learning process and make it fun.

One Fun Scientific Trick to Use When Teaching Your Child to Write

One scientific trick I have used is called Picturing Information. I read about this method in the book, Learning How to Learn: How to Succeed in School Without Spending All Your Time Studying; A Guide for Teens and Kids. Picturing Information makes it much easier to remember. This involves using both the right and left brain strengths into learning. One way to do this is to convert a fact into a picture, so you can remember it more easily. If the picture is strange or unusual, it is easier to remember. Additionally, if the picture involves movement, then it makes the connection stronger.

Let’s use a letter as an example. If your child is learning to write the letter A, you may want to connect it with a picture of a triangle. While tracing or showing them how to write it, tell your child the A is part triangle with a line in the middle. It is important to use what is familiar to your child for the picture. In other words, ensure the child knows what a triangle and line look like. If they don’t know, then use another picture such as stick man legs with a line in the middle.

You may also describe an A as stick man legs with a line in the middle.

When should a child be able to write?

Most experts say that children learn to write between the ages of 3-6. I believe children learn to write before they actually start writing if exposed in the right way. This begins once a parent exposes their child to how letters, numbers, and shapes are formed through reading books, building, doing art, and participating in physical play. When children see letters, shapes, and numbers in books or in the real world often, their brain is taking note of how they are formed. When children start writing they will know letter and number formation which makes it easier to write.

How play can help In teaching your child to write

Building and doing art can help strengthen a child’s hand muscles to prepare them for writing. Building various structures with Legos, magnetic tiles, or Play-Doh helps develop a child’s pincer grasp, which is the coordination of the index finger and thumb to hold an item. This is also a great way to develop fine motor skills. A child is using the pincer grasp when they hold a paint brush, put money in a piggy bank, and learn to button their shirt.

Physical play is a great way to develop a child’s handwriting skills. Children can make letters with their bodies through creative dance. Also, crawling and yoga is a way to strengthen hand muscles which is beneficial for writing.

How can I help my child write faster?

Often I am asked how I got my son to write the alphabet and numbers as a 2-year-old. It wasn’t that he learned to write quickly, I just started earlier. When he was a baby, I read aloud to him various colorful children’s books about shapes, letters, and numbers. Not only was I reading to him, but I would take my finger and outline the shapes, letters, and numbers in the book.

We also built structures often with blocks and Play-doh. We created letters, shapes, and numbers with these toys and more. While creating we discussed our process in structuring each object and how they were formed.

So, if you want your child to write faster, simply start early through PLAY and fun exposure.

Fun and Easy Ways to Teach Your Toddler to Write Book

I wrote this book to show parents ways to expose their children to the formation of letters, numbers, and shapes in a fun way. This book will take you through a step by step process of how I taught my son handwriting skills. It gives you games/activities to do with your child along the way to make writing a process that is fun, natural, and stress free for the parent and child. 

This is a great tool for parents with children ages 0-7!

This book provides the following and so much more…

  • Fun scientific techniques in teaching kids handwriting skills.
  • How to execute fun in-depth learning
  • How to teach children to write before they actually start writing
  • How to incorporate digital media in your child’s learning 
  • The stages of writing
  • How to use PLAY when exposing your child to handwriting
  • The importance of learning in different settings
  • How to teach your child to hold writing utensils correctly
  • What to do when your child does not want to write
  • Hand strengthening activities that will prepare your child to write
  • Once your child begins to write, how to continue to build their handwriting skills

Here is What Others are Saying about the Book

This is a fantastic, thoughtful resource for anyone who wants to give their child a head start for school as well as cultivate a love for learning. It gives parents or caregivers who want to spend quality time with their child clear instructions and a wide variety of activities so they can strengthen their bond and create lasting memories with their child while teaching them valuable skills and having fun. An indispensable resource for those with young children! —Stacey K., editor and mother of 4

“This book is a fantastic resource for parents and educators in the midst of teaching their children literacy skills.  It provides excellent activities, book references, and resources to teach toddlers how to write, along with educational insights regarding children’s brain development and cognition.  I love how Andrea uses fun and creative literacy techniques to instill an early love of learning in young children. As a mom of two toddlers, I am excited to use these engaging techniques with my girls!”  —Amber., counselor and mother of 4

This book is a great companion to Teach Your Toddler to Read Through Play. The book contains many activities for different learning styles. It is definitely not a one-size-fits-all approach to learning how to write. Parents and children can bond with each other and have fun while figuring out what works best for them. If your child enjoys nature, STEM, crafts, role-playing, or music, you’ll find something to pique their interests inside the pages. Not only does this book help your child learn to write, Andrea includes scientific insight about brain development to support the value of these child-centered and age-appropriate activities. Once again, Andrea has made learning fun! —Danielle J., Attorney and mother of 2

The Book is Available on Amazon in Paperback and Kindle! Click on the Image Above to Find It.

Not sure yet? Get a free excerpt of Fun Ways to Teach Your Toddler to Write by completing the form below.

You won’t be sorry!

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