Fun Thermometer Science Experiment for Kids

One day my son and I were watching the Temperature Investigation episode of Sid the Science Kid cartoon. Cory was two-years-old the first time he watched it. After the episode ended, we decided to do the science experiment showcased on the cartoon. My son learned a lot about thermometers and temperature change during this activity.

Fall is coming soon and our children will witness a drop in temperature. Do this simple experiment at home to help your child learn about temperature changes in nature. I am pretty sure you have all the materials in your kitchen.

Let’s Get Started!

Materials Needed:

Method:

  • Put ice in the bowl
  • Put the thermometer in the ice
The temperature on the thermometer was originally 75°F or 23° C but it decreased to 50° F or 10° C in this picture.
  • Open the instant grits or oatmeal packet.
  • Pour the ingredients from the packet in a second bowl.
  • Pour hot water in the bowl and stir to mix.
  • Put the thermometer in bowl.
  • You will see the temperature on the thermometer go up.
The temperature started at 20° F or -6° C and increased to over 100° F or 37° C.

  • Try putting ice in the bowl of grits or oatmeal and observe what happens to the temperature.
  • Hint: It should decrease.

Watch the video below to see our experiment.

IMG_9798

Have fun with this activity!

Bonus

Explain to your child how a real thermometer works

  • Thermometers usually have alcohol in them.
  • The alcohol changes its size in the thermometer which causes the temperature to increase or decrease.

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5 Ways to Increase Focus in Children

I have parents approach me asking how to keep their child focused when learning something new or doing school work. This is something that we all face from time to time as parents.

Children can lose their focus for a number of reasons including…

  • they are not interested in the task
  • they are distracted
  • the task is too hard for them
  • they would rather be doing something else

Below are some tips that have helped in our household. Please share your tips in the comments below.

Breaking Up the Tasks

Our brains start to lose optimal focus after 25 minutes. Therefore in order to have optimal concentration, try to break tasks into 25 minutes of focused blocks of time. This is also called the Pomodoro Technique and will help your child focus on the task at hand. After 25 minutes has ended, have your child take a break. After the break, they can come back to the task for another 25 minutes.

Create More Beginnings and Endings

When reading a book, we tend to remember the beginning and ending for longer periods of time. Also, when we watch movies, it seems like the start and end of the story sticks in our brain. The proper terms for these occurrences are the primacy and recency effect. Primacy Effect is when you remember things at the beginning of the list because it happened first. The Recency Effect is when you remember the end of the list or an occurrence.

Remember we said the brain starts to lose optimal focus after 25 minutes. When you combine your knowledge of the Pomodoro Technique, Primacy, and Recency Effects, it makes sense to create more beginnings and endings. You may accomplish this by taking more breaks. Your child will remember more because there are more “firsts and lasts” bits of information that will stick in their brain.

Taking Responsibility

Many of us want to put ALL the blame on our children for NOT having better focus when it comes to school or learning something new. However, I think we have to look at our role in the matter as well.

For example, I wanted my son to have better focus in the morning while getting dressed for school. We were always rushing to get ready for school. The problem was I often got out of bed late causing him to rush. He is the type of child that gets the tasks done but likes to takes his time to do it.

Once I started getting up earlier in the morning, he seems to have more focus.

For the days when he needs to move a little faster, I created some games/activities to make our morning routine efficient and effective.

As far as studying, it is effective to make the information more relevant to your child and break it up into smaller tasks. We will talk about this in the next point.

Shaping

Sometimes children find a task so daunting that it is difficult for them to sit for 25 minutes. This is where Shaping can help save the day. Shaping is a technique many counselors use to teach kids new behaviors. It allows you to build a desired behavior in children using small steps. Once the child has mastered a step then you move to the next one. 

If it is difficult for your child to focus for 10 minutes, have them try five minutes. If they are successful next time, add one or two minutes to the next session. Keep doing this until you have reached the desired 25 minutes. Also, give your child small rewards for completing a task. It will help keep them motivated.

Have Children Take Charge of Their Learning

I remember being in school thinking to myself, “Why do I have to learn this?” Some of the information we learned as children have never been used in our adult lives. However, learning something new strengthens your brain and puts you in better mental shape to be creative and work on your passion. When your child does not see the point in what they are learning, request that they be creative and make it relevant by using the Chain Linking technique. Chain linking is a memory technique that allows your child to use their imagination and creativity to link facts to pictures and stories.

Chain linking is a great way for your child to take charge of their learning because they are creating the factual links to pictures and stories. When they create ways to remember information, they have more of connection to it. It also helps them learn information faster in a fun way.

Bonus Tip:

When your child tells you a task is too hard, talk to them about the Power of Mistakes and its importance in learning.

I hope you find this helpful!

Happy Learning!

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4 Games/Activities that Teach Kids Manners

Many parents are successful at teaching their children manners through modeling the behavior or reminding kids to use them. This post brings a fun, hands-on approach to teaching manners. The games/activities below can be a supplement to what you are already teaching your children at home. These are great group activities to play with young kids. I hope you find these helpful!

Let’s get started!



Please and Thank You Game

The following game will teach your child when to say Please and Thank you.

Materials Needed:

  • 3 Stuffed Animals or 3 Action Figures
  • Tape
  • Paper
  • Scissors

  1. Explain to your child that Please should be used with any request such as…
    • When your child wants a drink
    • They should say “May I PLEASE have a drink?”
    • If the child is very young then they can say “Drink, please.”
  2. Explain to your child that Thank you is used when they receive an item, favor, or an act of kindness.
    • For example, children should use it when someone gives them a drink, a gift, or when they have visited someone’s home.
  3. Start the activity by having your child gather their stuffed animals and action figures.
  4. Cut 3 rectangles out of the paper.
  5. Write the word, Doing, on one rectangle and then tape it on the front of one stuffed animal or action figure.
    • The Doing toy’s job is to role play the scenarios with your child.
  6. Write the word, Thank you, on one rectangle and then tape it on the front of one stuffed animal or action figure.
    • The Thank you toy’s job is to say Thank you in the scenario if needed.
  7. Write the word, Please, on one rectangle and then tape it on the front of one stuffed animal or action figure.
    • The Please toy’s job is to say Please in the scenario if needed.
  8. Create four scenarios where the child will have to role play and identify when to use Thank you or Please like the examples below…
    • The Doing Toy just shared his snack with your child. (Answer – say Thank you)
    • The Doing Toy would like a banana. What should the toy say? (Answer – May I please have a banana?) (Another option is Banana please).
    • Your child spilled the Legos on the floor and the Doing Toy helped your child clean up. (Answer – say Thank you)
    • The Doing toy wants to play at the playground. What should the toy say? (Answer – Can you take me to the playground, please?)
  9. Role play the scenarios above (or scenarios you have created) one at a time with the toys and your child.
  10. Below is an example of how the role play should be played. Let use the first scenario as an example..
    • The child and Doing toy should role play the following scenario – The Doing Toy just shared his snack with your child.
    • Now the child should decide if the Thank you toy or Please toy is needed.
    • In this scenario, the child should get the Thank you toy to say Thank you to the Doing toy.
    • If your child is confused about whether to use the Thank you toy or Please toy help them to determine the correct answer.
  11. Repeat steps 9-10 with the scenarios given in number 8. You may also create your own scenarios.
The Manner Animals

Super V!

This activity gives kids a reminder to cover their mouths when they cough and sneeze.

Material Needed:

  • The child’s arm
  1. Explain to your child that it is important to cover their mouths when they cough or sneeze to prevent the spread of germs.
  2. Germs can cause others to get sick.
  3. The best way to stop the spread of germs is to cover your mouth and nose with a tissue.
  4. If you don’t have time to get a tissue, then use SUPER V!!!
  5. SUPER V is when you cough and sneeze into the inner crease of your elbow.
  6. When do you this, your arm forms the letter V.
  7. Pretend that you are sneezing or coughing and model to your child how to cover their mouth.
    • As you model how to cover your mouth, say SUPER V like it is a superhero!
  8. Have your child practice saying and doing the SUPER V mouth cover position.
  9. Every time your child really coughs or sneeze, say SUPER V!
  10. If your child is not into superheroes then create something else like the PRINCESS SHIELD to help them remember to cover their mouths.
Sick child doing the Super V

Excuse Me Game

This game will teach your child when it is appropriate to say Excuse Me.

Materials Needed:

  • Something that makes a loud noise like a bell, drum, whistle, or kazoo
  • Child’s stuffed animals, action figures, or other toys
  1. Explain to your child that Excuse Me should be used in the following situations
    • To get another person’s attention
    • When you need to get around someone and they are in your pathway.
    • When you have bumped into someone or accidentally stepped on their foot.
    • During an acceptable interruption
      • For example, if mom is talking to someone and the young child needs to go to the bathroom.
    • When you burp or pass gas
  2. After explaining step 1, role play the situations with your child (using yourself and child as the actors for practice).
  3. Next get your child’s toys.
  4. Give your child a loud noise maker of your choice such as a bell, drum, whistle, or kazoo.
  5. Use the child’s toys to role play each scenario in number 1 and scenarios where Excuse Me is not needed such as…
    • You give your child a snack.
    • Your child wants to go outside and play.
  6. After role playing each scenario with the toys, give the child two choices in which to respond…
    • If saying Excuse Me is an appropriate response to the scenario, then the child should use their noise maker and next say Excuse Me.
    • Is Excuse Me is NOT the appropriate response to the scenario, then the child can say NO!
  7. For example, you role play that one action figure burps and your child has a drum.
    • The child should play the drum and then say Excuse Me.
  8. Keep playing the game with various scenarios.

No Interruptions Game

This activity uses the concept of Shaping to teach kids to be patient while parents are talking to others in person or on the phone. Shaping is a technique many counselors use to teach kids new behaviors or skills. It allows you to build a desired behavior in children using small steps. Once the child has mastered a step, then move to the next one. 

Materials:

  • One of the child’s stuffed animal, action figure, or other toy
  • Timer
  • Pretend or toy telephone
  1. Explain to your child that interruption is when they talk while someone else is talking.
  2. Interrupting is considered rude unless it is an acceptable interruption such as…
    • You have to go to the bathroom
    • You or someone is hurt.
  3. Some kids interrupt their parents for attention or they think the conversation topic with the other adult is boring.
  4. Start the No Interruptions Game by getting your child’s toy and the telephone.
  5. Tell your child they can’t talk to you until the timer goes off.
    • If this is a struggle for them, suggest ideas to keep them busy like counting, playing with a toy, or just listening.
  6. Set the timer to 20 seconds.
  7. Pretend you are on the phone while the timer is going.
  8. After the times goes off, tell your child they can talk.
  9. If your child does NOT interrupt you within the 20 second period, then next time increase the time to 30 seconds and so on.
  10. Do this until you get to a desired time like 5 minutes.
  11. If your child talks to you before the timer goes off, then try the activity again with the timer set to a lesser time like 10 seconds and work from there.

I hope you find these activities helpful!

Don’t forget to check our two books, Teach your Toddler to Read Through Play and Fun and Easy Ways to Teach your Toddler to Write.

Happy Learning!

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Make Reading Fun for Kids with DIY Book Hook

One day while my three-year-old son played independently with toy cars, I was reading a book that contained over 400 pages. When I reached the end of a chapter, I inserted my bookmark to maintain my place.

My son saw the bookmark and asked me what it was. I told him that bookmarks tell me what section of the book I read previously. It is a timesaver because it prevents me from flipping through the book to find where I stopped reading.

He was amazed that this rectangular-shaped piece of paper could do so much. This was during the time we started reading books like Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White which is a chapter book.

Watch the Video below to Learn How to Accelerate Young Readers’ Skills with Art

We read other books in the past that needed a bookmark like 5-minute Bible Stories retold by Mary Batchelor and Penny Boshoff. This book has a compilation of Bible stories for children. For some reason, we didn’t use a bookmark after reading the book. I just flipped through the pages and tried to remember the last story we read. This was not a good use of time.

Once my son became curious about my bookmark, I decided we should make our own. I am not an artsy person and needed some help in making one that would appeal to him. The book, Easy Art Fun! Do-It-Yourself Crafts for Beginning Readers by Jill Hauser, saved the day.

This book showed us how to make a SIMPLE bookmark or book hook that looks like my son. We had a great time creating them! They are used daily after reading time. My son often tells me we should make more bookmarks.

This a great project to do with the child who won’t sit for an entire book. Try reading part of a book and save your place with their look alike book hook.

So Let’s Get Started with Creating!

How to Make the Book Hooks

Materials:

  • Markers
  • Colored Paper or Card Stock Paper
  • Child Safety Scissors

Method:

  • Help your child draw themselves on colored paper with markers.
    • Draw the arms so that they are hanging low.

Here is the result of his drawing.

Here is my drawing.

I gave him a face, hair, socks, and pants.
  • Color the drawing.
  • Cut out the drawing.
  • Cut the arms with slits

  • Hook your drawing to the top of a page.
  • Close the book and hold your place.




Have more fun with this activity by making a variety of book hooks like…

  • Animals
  • Superheros
  • Letters
  • Numbers
  • Cars
  • Dolls
  • Anything you want

Have fun Creating!

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Magic Kitchen Balloon Science Experiment

Did you know that science experiments can make children better readers? The book, The Three R’s by Ruth Beechick, which is about early childhood learning supports this fact.

In this book she talks about an experiment where some kindergartners in a school district received extensive instructions in reading while the others spent the same amount of time learning science.

The kids that learned science melted ice, observed thermometers in hot and cold places, played with magnets, grew plants and learned about animal life. Books and pictures were available for these children but no formal lessons in reading were held.

The school district learned that by the third grade the “science” children were far ahead of the “reading” children in their reading score. The reason is their vocabulary and thinking skills were much more advanced. They could read on more topics and understand higher levels of material. The playful, hands-on activities the “science” children did taught them analytical and problem solving skills and how to make connections in what they were learning.

This is why I think EXPOSING KIDS TO NEW WORDS AND READING THROUGH PLAY IS A GREAT CONCEPT.

So let’s talk about our exciting science experiment!

Today we will…

Blow Up A Balloon Without Blowing At All!

To incorporate literacy in this experiment, help your children read the Materials, Method, and Why it Works headings in this post. As kids are reading these sections, have them do the action. Children can use the pictures to help them read the words. If your children can read independently allow them to do so.

How to incorporate literacy in this experiment…

  1. Read the Materials and Method sections.
  2. Re-read the Materials section as you get the supplies.
  3. Re-read the Method section as you do the steps.

Let’s get started!

Materials:

  • Vinegar
  • Teaspoon of Baking Soda
  • 1 Balloon
  • Empty Water Bottle
  • 1 Funnel
  • Spoon
  • Safety goggles (we didn’t have safety goggles so we used sunglasses)

Method:

  • Put on your safety goggles (or sunglasses).
  • Pour some vinegar into the water bottle
    • Vinegar should fill 25% of the water bottle.
  • Pour baking soda into the balloon.
    • Stretch the balloon over the funnel’s neck.
    • Take the teaspoon of baking soda and put it in the funnel.
    • Ensure the baking soda reaches the inside of the balloon.
Balloon stretched over the funnel’s neck.
My son is looking for the teaspoon to measure the baking soda.

The baking soda is in the funnel. It goes down the funnel into the balloon.

  • Stretch the balloon over the water bottle’s neck.
It is hard to see but there is vinegar in the water bottle. The balloon has baking soda in it.
  • Pick up the balloon and empty out the baking soda into the water bottle.
    • AFTER THE BAKING SODA GOES INTO BOTTLE, PLEASE BACK UP IN CASE THE BALLOON POPS.
    • The balloon popped when we did the experiment for the first time.
    • Safety goggles will protect your eyes in case the balloon pops.
  • Stand back and watch the balloon BLOW UP!

Below is a video of my son and I doing the experiment!

Why it works?

  • As the baking soda mixes with the vinegar, it creates bubbles of carbon dioxide gas that escapes into the balloon.
  • This makes the balloon blow up by itself.
  • If the mixture creates a lot of gas, then the balloon will get so big until it pops!

Have fun experimenting!

Resources:

Easy Art Fun Do-It-Yourself Crafts for Beginning Readers by Jill Frankel Hauser

Crafty Science by Jane Bull


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100 Children’s Books About Money

I remember at the age of 17 my older brother, Linsey, gave me the book, Rich Dad Poor Dad by Robert Kiyosaki. This book changed my perspective about how I thought about money.

One point that stuck with me was when you are an adult your report card is your credit score. I found this statement fascinating and I made the decision to do two things after that..

  • To strive to have an excellent credit score as an adult
  • To teach my children financial literacy

Although my son is a preschooler, I have introduced him to money through role plays, having him count and earn real money, and reading books. 

I would like all children to be exposed to financial literacy. My contribution is by compiling this list of Children’s Book about Money. 

Sign in to our SOY Resource Library and get access to 10 ACTIVITIES TO BOOST KIDS’ FINANCIAL LITERACY KNOWLEDGE.

 

Learn how my three-year-old son has the ability to read on a 3rd grade level. Go to the bottom of this post to access the First Chapter of the ebook, Teach Your Toddler to Read Through Play: A Detailed Account with over 130 Games/Activities, Tips, and Resources for FREE!

Want More Tips? Watch the Video Below for Effective & Fun Study Tips for Kids/Tweens/Teens

Let’s Get Started!

  1. Gabby Invents the Perfect Hair Bow by Erica Swallow/Li Zeng

    • At five years old, Gabby Goodwin can’t stop losing her hair bows everywhere she goes. She and her mother invent a new kind of bow that doesn’t fall out. Read this book to see if their idea works.
  2. Lily Learn about Wants and Needs by Lisa Bullard/Christine Schneider

    • Lily wants a new bike, a new raincoat, and ice cream. But how many of these things does she need? As Lily and her dad drive around town, Lily soon discovers that wants and needs are different things. 
  3. Jason Saves the Environment with Entrepreneurship by Erica Swallow/Li Zeng

    • Problem-solver Jason Li has been on a mission to pay for his own lunch since he started school. He has an idea that helps him achieve his goal and save the planet.
  4. Growing Money: A Complete Investing Guide for Kids by Gail Karlitz/Debbie Honig

    • This book is a complete guide explaining in kid-friendly terms all about savings accounts, bonds, stocks, and even mutual funds!
  5. Lemonade in Winter: A Book About Two Kids Counting Money by Emily Jenkin/G. Brian Karas

    • A lemonade stand in winter? Yes, that’s exactly what Pauline and John-John intend to have, selling lemonade and limeade. Children will learn about simple math concepts in a fun way with this book.
  6. Curious About Money by Mary E. Reid

    •  Children will learn how people, money, and history intersect, and what’s current about currency.
  7.  It’s Not Fair!: A Book About Having Enough by Caryn Riverdeneria/Isabel Moñoz

    • Roxy Ramirez has saved up for weeks to buy a chemistry set, and now she’s headed to the toy store to buy it! There’s only one problem. She keeps running into friends who are in trouble, and need her to dip into her savings to help. Will she have enough money left over to buy something for herself?
  8.  The Squirrel Manifesto by Rich Edelman/David Zabocki

    • Just as a squirrel gathers nuts to prepare for the winter—eating some now and storing some for later—kids can learn the value of money by spending some of their allowance now and saving the rest for later using animals as examples.
  9. Kidpreneurs: Young Entrepreneurs With  Big Ideas! by Adam Toren/Matthew Toren

    • This book teaches kids about starting, managing, and growing a successful business venture.
  10. What Can You Do With Money? by Jennifer Larson

    • This basic introduction to earning and spending explains how people earn incomes in exhange for their work and skill. It then explains the economic choices people make in saving or spending their income.
  11. The Big Buck Adventure by Shelley Gill/Deborah Tobola/Grace Lin

    • One little girl and one very big dollar set out on a great adventure at the store.
      What will she do with so many choices, and only one buck? Read this book to find out.
  12. Let’s Meet Ms. Money: One Step Towards Financial Literacy by Rich Grant

    • Let’s Meet Ms. Money is a children’s picture book that teaches children about money. Kids will learn what money looks like, how to count it, how and why we use money, and how we earn it.
  13.  Liktoon’s Boat: A Children’s Storybook about money, entrepreneurship, and teamwork

    • This book addresses earnings, savings, addition, subtraction, business, profits, and expenses through the characters’ adventure.
  14. A Million Gold Coins: Teaching Kids about Happiness and Money by Sigal Adler

    • Two farmers are not happy about working so hard for money. However, they may be looking for happiness in the wrong places.
  15. Everything a Kid Needs to Know about Money – Children’s Money and Saving Reference by Baby Professor

    • Teach your kids the basics about finances with this book. There’s no such thing as too early when it comes to these things. Properly seal the deal about money and other possessions by introducing this book.
  16. I Got Bank! What my Granddad Taught Me About Money by Teri Williams

    •  At ten years old, Jazz  Ellington, has over $2,000 in the bank, and his savings keep growing. His granddad taught him to save his allowance and set up a bank account. This book increases financial awareness while sharing the lives of two African-American boys growing up in the city.
  17. Dimes: To Teach Your Child About Money by Rebecca D. Turner/Lacey Braziel

    • This book teaches discipline, delayed gratification, and how good it feels to give to those in need. Dimes can teach your child the habits that will allow them to have a more financially secure and fulfilling life.
  18. Sebastian Creates A Sock Company by Erica Swallow/Li Zeng

    • Five-year-old Sebastian Martinez, with the help of his older brother, turns his love for socks into a business that not only makes wacky socks, but also enables the duo to finally revamp the school dress code. 
  19. Those Shoes by Noah Jones

    • Jeremy wants a pair of the shoes everyone at school is wearing. Jeremy’s grandma says they don’t have room for wants just needs. Read how Jeremy and his grandma navigate through this dilemma.
  20. Money for Puppy by D.L. Madson

    • This is an excellent book about saving money for something you want.
  21. The Wrong Shoes: A Book About Money and Self-Esteem by Caryn Rinadeneira

    • The Wrong Shoes teaches kids about money, hard work, self-esteem, and the real value of the things we own.
  22. The Penny Pot: Counting Coins by Stuart J. Murphy/Lynne Woodcock Cravath

    • This is a great book that shows kids how to count money how it is used, and saving to get what you want.
  23. Lemonade for Sale by Stuart Murphy/Tricia Tusa

    • Four kids and their sidekick, Petey the Parrot, run a lemonade stand. They create a bar graph to track the rise and fall of their lemonade sales.
  24. Sluggers’ Car Wash by Stuart J. Murphy/Barney Saltzberg

    • The 21st Street Sluggers’ shirts are worn-out and dirty. They need new ones, but they have no money. Children will learning to count money and make change.
  25. Arthur’s Pet Business by Marc Brown

    • Arthur starts his own petsitting business to show Mom and Dad that he can be responsible! Between a boa constrictor, an ant farm, and a group of frogs, he’s got his hands full! Can Arthur still prove he is responsible?
  26. One Proud Penny by Sandy Riegel/Serge Bloch

    • This book teaches kids that pennies are worth a lot and how it’s life can be exciting.
  27.  Money Math: Addition and Subtraction by David Adler/Edward Miller

    • Children will get an introduction to American units of money; and how they combine to make a price. They will also learn basic money symbols and the math inherent in shopping.
  28.  The Go-Around Dollar by Barbara Johnston-Adams/Joyce Audy Zarins

    • Children will learn how the dollar is made, the meaning of the symbols that are shown on the front and back of the dollar, and how long the average dollar stays in circulation?
  29. Arthur’s Funny Money by William Hoban

    • Arthur attempts to earn enough money to buy a t-shirt and cap, assisted by his sister Violet. Children will learn simple business concepts by reading this story.
  30. The Original Story of the Piggy Bank: The Beginning of a Legend! by Lance Douglas

    • This book gives background information on the piggy bank. It also contains powerful lessons of discipline, sacrifice and responsibility.
  31. You Wouldn’t Live Without Money by Professor Alex Woolf/David Antram

    • This book uses humorous cartoons  to tell the story of money, from early bartering to the making of metal and paper currencies.
  32. DK Eyewitness Books: Money: Discover the Fascinating  Story of Money from Silver Ingot to Smart Cards by Joe Cribb

    • Children will learn about the earliest forms of money to the banking systems we have today.
  33.  Dollars and Sense: A Kid’s Guide to Using – Not Losing- Money by Elaine Scott/David Clark

    • Dollars & Sense is a basic instruction manual for money that will teach readers about the history of money, the way the American economy works, and how to make important decisions about personal finance.
  34.  Dollars and Sense by Stan Berenstain/Jan Berenstain

    • Papa thinks it’s time to teach Brother and Sister how to budget their money. Children journey with the cubs on their process to understand the value of a dollar.
  35.  A Chair for My Mother by Vera B. Williams

    • After their home is destroyed by a fire, Rosa, her mother, and grandmother save their coins to buy a really comfortable chair for all to enjoy.
  36. Rock, Brock, and the Savings Shock by Sheila Bair/Barry Gott

    • Rock and Brock are twins and their grandpa offers them a plan―for ten straight weeks on Saturday he will give them each one dollar. But there is a catch!  Each buck they save, he’ll match it quick. If they spend it, there’s no extra dough.
  37. When Times are Tough by Yanitzia Canetti/Romont Willy

    • This book follows a family that faces very real economic challenges. They show how they are able to overcome with each other.
  38. The Kids’ Money Book: Earning, Saving, Spending, Investing, Donating by Jamie McGillian

    • This book explains how to create a budget, make money, invest your earnings, and donate to charity. It also teaches kids the difference between needs and wants and getting the most from an allowance.
  39. Once Upon A Dime: A Math Adventure by Nancy Kelly Allen/Adam Doyle

    • This book is about a  farmer discovering  trees that grows different types of money.  This book teaches kids about the value of money
  40. How to Turn $100 to $1,000,000: Earn! Save! Invest! by Jenna McKenna/Jeannine Glista

    • Children will learn the basics of earning, saving, spending, and investing money.
  41.  Ella Earns Her Own Money by Lisa Bullard/Mike Moran
    • Ella wants a soccer ball, but she doesn’t have enough money to buy one. She decides to earn her own money. Will she earn enough to buy the ball? Read this book to find out!
  42.  Kyle Keeps Track of Cash by Lisa Bullard/Mike Byrne

    • Kyle’s club is going camping and all the kids will sell Cool Candy to earn money for the trip. Kyle needs to find buyers for ten boxes of candy. Can he keep track of his cash and join his friends on the camping trip? Read this book to find out!
  43. What Does It Means to be an Entrepreneur by Rana Diorio/Emma Dryden

    • When Rae witnesses an ice cream and dog mishap, she’s inspired to create a solution to help get dogs clean. Rae draws on her determination and everyone else in her community when she learns what it means to be an entrepreneur.
  44.  A Smart Girl’s Guide: Money: How to Make It, Save It, and Spend It by Nancy Holyoke/Brigette Barrager
    • Children will learn how to not only spend money, but also how to earn it. The quizzes, tips, and helpful quotes from other girls will make learning about money management easy and fun.
  45. The History of Money by Martin Jenkins/Satoshi Kitamura

    • This book teaches children the following questions about money:  When did we start using it? And why? What does money have to do with writing? And how do taxes and interest work?
  46. Curious George Saves his Pennies by H.A. Rey

    • When George decides to save up for a red train in the toy store, he doesn’t realize how long it will take or how hard he’ll have to work for his money. Read this book and find out if he gets the train.
  47.  Piggy Bank Problems by Fran Manuskkin/Tammie Lyon
    • Katie’s dad works at a bank  but she prefers to keep her money in her piggy bank. Read about what happens when she drops her piggy and it breaks?
  48.  Deena’s Lucky Penny by Barbara Derubertis/Cynthia Fisher

    • Deena has a big problem. Her mom’s birthday is coming, but she has no money to buy a present! Find out how she solves the problem by reading this book.
  49. Follow Your Money: Who Gets it, Who Spends it, Where Does it Go? by Kevin Sylvester/Michael Hlinka, Julia Beck

    • Find out what happens to your money after you hand it to the cashier. What happens to that money once it leaves your hands? Who actually pockets it or puts it into the bank? Read this book to answer these questions.
  50.  Currency by Andrew Einspruch
    • The book gives an introduction to currency through the history of money around the world, minting coins and printing paper money.
  51. Feeding Piggy by Kathy Mashburn/Freida Talley

    • Maddy has a piggy bank named Piggy. One morning while feeding Piggy coins for breakfast, Maddy discovers how coins, like people, come in different shapes and sizes.
  52.  A Dollar, A Penny How Much and How by Lerner Publications
    • This humorous book shows young readers how to count and combine pennies, nickels, fives, tens, and more!
  53.  Sophie the Zillonaire by Lara Bergen/Laura Tallardy

    • When Sophie finds fifty dollars on the sidewalk, it gives her a great idea for a new name: Sophie the Zillionaire! In order to keep the name Sophie the Zillionaire, Sophie has to make more money — and fast.
  54. Berenstain Bears Trouble with Money by Stan Berenstain

    • Mama and Papa are worried that Brother and Sister seem to think money grows on trees. The cubs decide to start their very own businesses, from a lemonade stand to a pet-walking service.
  55.  Just Saving Money by Mercer Mayer

    • Little Critter® wants a new skateboard and Dad tells him that he needs to save his own money to buy it! From feeding the dog to selling lemonade, Little Critter learns the value of a dollar.
  56. Lots and Lots of Coins by Margarette S. Reid/True Kelley

    • This book is about a boy spending the day with Dad coin collecting!  He finds out about the value of coins, what people used before coins, and why historical images and people appear on coins.
  57.  A Dollar for Penny by Julie Glass/Joy Allen

    • A young girl sets up a lemonade stand and sells enough cups of refreshment to add up to a dollar.  This story combines the teaching of addition with  childhood entrepreneurship!  
  58. The Young Investor by Katherine Bateman

    • The book explains the concept of money and  how saving works based on the concepts of simple and compound interest. Children then learn where Wall Street is located, what stocks and bonds do, and, the right way to buy or sell a stock, mutual fund, or savings bond.
  59. You can’t buy a Dinosaur with a Dime by Harriet Ziefert

    •  Pete saves his allowance and spends too much of it. He then has second thoughts and starts over. Children will learn how he strategizes over future purchases. 
  60. Not Your Parents’ Money Book: Making, Saving, and  Spending Your Own Money by Jean Chatzsky/Erwin Haya

    • This book will reach kids before bad spending habits can get out of control. With answers and ideas from real kids, this grounded approach to spending and saving will be a welcome change for kids who are inundated by a consumer driven culture.
  61.  Money Math with Sebastian Pig and Friends by Jill Anderson
    • This book introduces children to identifying, counting and comparing money through a farmer’s market trip with Sebastian Pig and Louie.
  62.  Money Madness by David Adler and Edward Miller
    • Children will be provided with a guide to economics and the purpose and value of money with this book.
  63. Coins and Other Currency by Tamra Orr

    • Follow a class of fifth-graders as they figure out the world of finance, including earning, budgeting, and saving to investing and collecting coins from around the world.
  64.  Show Me the Money by David Alder

    • Show Me the Money takes technical terms and breaks it down with easy-to-understand text, diagrams, and illustrations making a formerly dry subject interesting and relevant to kids
  65.  One Cent, Two Cents, Old Cent New Cent: All About Money by Bonnie Worth/Aristides Ruiz
    • The Cat in the Hat disqualifies the notion that money grows on trees with the study of money and its history.
  66.  Money, Money Honey Bunny by Marilyn Sadler/Roger Bollem
    • Honey Bunny Funny Bunny has a lot of money. She saves some and spends some on herself and friends. This is a rhyming book about spending and saving, told through the eyes of animals.
  67.  Mr. Chickee’s Funny Money by Christopher Paul Curtis

    • Mr. Chickee, a blind man in the neighborhood, gives 9-year-old Steven a mysterious bill with 15 zeros on it and the image of a familiar face. Could it be a quadrillion dollar bill? Could it be real? Read this book to find out.
  68. Cash, Credit Cards or Checks by Nancy Leewen

    • Children will learn how people pay for the things they buy by writing a check, paying with a debit card, paying with a credit card, and paying with cash withdrawn from an ATM.
  69. Taxes, Taxes!: Where the Money Goes by Nancy Leewen

    • Provides an introduction to taxes, including some of the products and services that citizens may receive including schools, roads, and national defense.
  70. In the Money: A Book About Banking by Nancy Leewen

    • Provides an introduction to banks and banking, including what the workers do, why customers come into banks, and explains what happens to old money.
  71.  The Kids Guide to Money Cent$ by Keltie Thomas/Stephen MacEachern

    • The Money Cent$ gang, three kids with very different money “personalities,” will help teach your child about money.
  72.  All About Money by Erin Roberson
    • This book introduces children to money,  while describing the concepts of earning, saving, and spending.
  73. Money Sense for Kids by Hollis Harman

    • This book answers the following questions about money: How and where is it printed? What do all those long numbers and special letters on currency mean? How are the newly designed bills improvements over the old ones?How can banks afford to pay interest?
  74. The Kids’ Money Book: Earning, Saving, Spending, Investing, Donating by Jamie Kyle McGillian

    •  This books explains how to create a budget, make money, invest your earnings, and donate to charity. 
  75. Money: A Rich History by Jon R. Anderson

    • Children will learn about the history of money with tons of cool facts,  illustrations, and photographs of coins and money from all over the world.
  76. Follow the Money by Loreen Leady

    • George, a newly minted quarter on his way to the bank, has quite a day. He’s about to be traded, spent, lost, found, donated, dropped into a vending machine, washed in a washing machine, and generally passed all around town.
  77. Double Fudge by Judy Blume

    • Fudge is obsessed with money. He’s making his own “Fudge Bucks” and has plans to buy the entire world. However, things get crazy once his family gets involved.
  78. The Big Buck Adventure by Shelley Gill

    • Follow the journey of a girl who tries to decide what she can get with her dollar in a candy shop, toy store, deli, and pet department.
  79.  A Dollar for Penny by Julie Grass/Joy Allen

    • On a summer day, a young girl sets up a lemonade stand and sells enough cups  to add up to a dollar.  This story combines the teaching of addition with a traditional rite of childhood entrepreneurship!  
  80. My Rows and Piles of Coins by Tolowa Mollel/E.B. Lewis

    • Saruni is saving coins for a red and blue bicycle. How happy he will be when he can help his mother carry heavy loads to market on his very own bicycle. How disappointed he is to discover that he hasn’t saved nearly enough!
  81. Isabel’s Car Wash by Sheila Bair/Judy Stead

    • The Nelly Longhair doll is on sale at Murphy’s Toys for ten dollars, but Isabel has only fifty cents. Isabel decides to start a car wash business. Will Isabel  earn enough for the Nelly doll?
  82. Prices, Prices, Prices by David Adler

    • In simple language  and colorful pictures, this book gives an introduction to economics explaining the basic laws of supply and demand.
  83.  Uncle Jed’s Barbershop by Margaree King Mitchell/James Ransome
    • This is a story of a man who spends his life struggling, saving, and sacrificing to build and own his own barbershop. Although there were many racial difficulties that stood in his way,  he opens the doors of his new shop  at the age of seventy-nine.
  84. Round and Round the Money Goes: What Money Is and How We Use It by Melvin Berger/Gilda Berger

    • This book explains the development of money from its origins in the barter system to its modern usage as cash, checks, and credit cards.
  85. How the Second Grade Got $8,205.50 to Visit the Statue of Liberty by Nathan Zimelman/Bill Slavin

    • A second grade class wants to visit the Statue of Liberty. They try to earn money for the trip by collecting paper, running a lemonade stand, sitting babies, walking dogs, and selling candy.
  86.  Benny’s Pennies by Pat Brisson

    • Benny McBride starts his day with five new pennies and is determined to spend them all. His family wants him to buy certain items. Will he be able to fulfill their requests?
  87. If You Made a Million by David Schwartz/Steven Kellogg

    • Have you ever wanted to make a million dollars? Marvelosissimo, the Mathematical Magician, is able to explain how to  earn money, invest it, accrue dividends and interest, and watch savings grow. 
  88. National Geographic Kids Everything Money: A Wealth of Facts, Photos, and Fun by Kathy Furgang

    • Kids will learn about money around the world from a National Geographic expert. This book is packed with fun facts and amazing photographs.
  89. My Pink Piggy Bank by Rozanne Williams

    • The book teaches kids the importance of saving.
  90. The Piggybank Blessing by Stan and Jan Berenstain

    • The Bear cubs like to spend money. Find out if the new piggy bank Mama bought will help teach Brother and Sister about saving money.
  91. The History of Money by Patricia Armentrout

    • This book examines the history of money, including the barter system, early trade in North America, unusual types of money such as huge stone disks and salt bars, and the first paper money.
  92. American Currency by Patricia Armentrout

    • This book introduces kids to the characteristics and values of the different coins and paper money used as currency in the United States.
  93.  A Quarter from the Tooth fairy by Caren Holzman

    • This book uses simple math concepts in an easy-to-read story plus six pages of math activities for parents and children to enjoy together.
  94. Pigs Will Be Pigs: Fun with Math and Money by Amy Axelrod/Sharon McGinley-Nally

    • The pigs are very hungry, and there’s no food in the house. Mr. Pig suggests eating out but there is no money! The family goes on a money hunt. Read to see if they find what they are looking for.
  95. The Monster Money Book by Loreen Leedy

    • This book teaches children about  borrowing, saving, and spending money. It  also makes many connections to the real world.
  96.  Jasmine Launches a Startup (Entrepreneurship Books for Kids) by Barhar Karroum/Jesus Vazquez Prada
    • This book will teach children how to start a business, to focus on a specific market, and to take risks.
  97. Kid Start-Up: How YOU Can Become an Entrepreneur by Mark Cuban/Shaan Patel

    • The book will help children how to discover a winning idea, launch their business, and start making money.
  98.  Rachel Turns Her Passion Into Business (Entrepreneur Kid) by Erica Swallow/Li Zeng
    • Teen lacrosse player Rachel Zietz takes an entrepreneurship course and realizes she can blend the worlds of business and fun by creating a lacrosse equipment company. 
  99.  Marvel’s of Money for Kids: Five Fully Illustrated Stories about Money and Financial Decisions for Life by Paul Nourigat

    • This is a book about money in which kids will like to read. There are five stories with conclusions and lessons learned. 
  100.  Why is there money? A Visual and Poetic Journey Through the History of Money by Paul Nourigat

    • This book teaches kids the history of money. It teaches the evolution of money in a simple way.

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55+ Black History Facts For Kids

February is Black History month! It is a time designated to celebrate the contributions of black people to this world. Black History Month was founded by Carter G. Woodson, who was a historian, author, and journalist.

I try to expose my son to black history year round so he will be knowledgable about the accomplishments of people that look like him.

I wanted to share this knowledge with others. In many ways our lives are better because of the people listed below. This list recognizes a small number of noted Black people as there are many. Find out who invented the potato chip, golf tee, three-way traffic signal, and mailbox. I encourage you to do your own research and expand your child’s knowledge of the rich history.

Learn how my three-year-old son has the ability to read on a 3rd grade level. Go to the bottom of this post to access the First Chapter of the ebook, Teach Your Toddler to Read Through Play: A Detailed Account with over 130 Games/Activities, Tips, and Resources for FREE!

Let’s Get Started!

  1. Mansa Musa is the richest person in history with a net worth of $400 Billion.
  2. George Crum was a chef that invented the potato chip in 1853.
  3. Sarah Boone invented the first portable modern day ironing board.
  4. Lonnie G. Johnson is an Aerospace Engineer that invented the famous Super Soaker Water Gun.
  5. Philip Downing designed the first mailbox. He created a metal box with four legs, which he called the letter box. It was a predecessor to the mailbox.
  6. Charles Drew was a surgeon that developed a way to process and store blood plasma in “blood banks” that saved people’s lives. His blood bank was adopted by the Red Cross.
  7. Jacqueline Davidson (my college roommate) is an attorney who became one of the highest ranking women in the NFL when she was named as the Chief Negotiator for the New York Jets Professional Football Team.
  8. Sarah Goode invented a folding cabinet bed that could go against the wall into a cabinet or a desk with compartments for stationary and writing supplies. She became the first African American woman to receive a United States patent.
  9. Benjamin Banneker made the first clock, authored a series of almanacs, and helped design Washington DC.
  10. Lewis Latimer worked for Thomas Edison when he invented the light bulb. Latimer invented the carbon filament that made the light bulb brighter and last longer.
  11. Jan Matzeliger invented a shoe machine that would automatically sew the upper shoes and sole together. This created a large industry of shoe companies.
  12. Percy Julian was a chemist that made physostigmine readily available for the treatment of glaucoma (an eye disorder that can lead to blindness). He received over 130 chemical patients, and was the first African American inducted into the National Academy of Sciences.
  13. Bessie Coleman was the first woman to hold a pilot license. She was denied entry in flying schools in the United States. She taught herself French and moved to France to earn her pilot license.
  14. Alexander Miles was awarded a patent for an automatically opening and closing elevator door. He invented a mechanism that triggered the shaft doors to open and close along with the elevator door, making the ride safer.
  15. Madam C.J. Walker was the first American woman to become a self-made millionaire.
  16. W.E.B. Du Bois was the first African-American to earn a doctorate. He was one of the founding members of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) in 1909.
  17. Meredith Gourdine invented the Incineraid system which prevented smoke from burning buildings and kept fog away from airport runways. He also invented the Focus Flow Heat Sink which is a device that kept computer chips cool.
  18. Alfred L. Cralle developed the idea of the ice cream scooper in 1897. He was a successful Pittsburgh business promoter as well.
  19. John Henry Thompson invented the computer language Lingo, which is used in many video games, animations, web design applications, and graphics programs.
  20. George Alcorn invented an imaging spectrometer which is a device that helps scientists identify what materials are made of. He also created 20 other inventions while working for NASA and IBM.
  21. Robert Smalls was a slave who escaped to freedom in a Confederate supply ship and eventually became a sea captain for the Union Navy. After the war, he became a successful businessman and politician serving in both houses of the South Carolina legislature.
  22. Granville Woods invented a transmitter that improved hearing over greater distances for the telephone.
  23. Daniel Hale Williams was one of the first physicians to perform open-heart surgery in the United States and founded a hospital with an interracial staff.
  24. Elijah McCoy was an inventor and engineer who is known for his 57 U.S. patents. He invented a way to lubricate steam engines without shutting them down, which saved a great amount of time and effort in transportation and in industrial production.
  25. Shirley Chisholm is the first black woman elected to the United States Congress.
  26. Garrett A. Morgan invented and patented the first chemical hair straightener, received a patent for the first gas mask, and invented the three-way traffic signal.
  27. George Washington Carver invented many uses for the peanut, sweet potato, pecans and soybeans. He made rubber, adhesives, dyes, pigments, and other products.
  28. Frederick McKinley Jones invented portable cooling units for trucks, trains, ships, and aircraft so products would stay cool when stored.
  29. James E. West invented a microphone that was smaller, lighter, and less expensive while working at Bell Laboratories in 1962.
  30. Nobert Rillieux invented a machine that used steam to evaporate water and keep sugar from burning and being discolored when it is produced. This machine is used today to make soap, glue, milk and other products.
  31. Dr. Patricia Bath is an ophthalmologist that invented a safer and more comfortable procedure for cataract surgery. Her Laserphco Phobe uses an optical laser to vaporize the cataract in a person’s eye.
  32. Dr. Mark Dean is a math genius who invented the 1-Gigahertz chip which made computers faster than ever.
  33. Otis Boykin created a wire resistor that allowed a certain amount of electricity flow to a component. This resistor was used in household appliances, computers, and pacemakers.
  34. Maria Van Brittan Brown and her partner, Albert Brown, invented a closed-circuit television security system that spearheaded modern security systems.
  35. Dr. Daniel Hale Williams was the first person to perform an open heart surgery.
  36. Benjamin Bradley invented a powerful steam engine at the age of 16 that helped warships travel faster at sea. He sold the idea in exchange for his freedom.
  37. Lloyd Hall invented several ways to preserve and sterilize food so it would not spoil when it is processed, packed and transported. He used heat, chemicals, and gas to eliminate the germs and bacteria in meat and other foods.
  38. Charles Brooks invented the first self-propelled street sweeper truck, which cleans the street.
  39. Dr. Mae Jemison is the first African American female to become an astronaut. She is an engineer and doctor.
  40. Dr. Ben Carson performed the first successful separation of Siamese twins who were joined at the back of the head.
  41. Henrietta Bradberry invented a new way for torpedoes to be discharged from submarines and subterranean forts.
  42. Andrew Beard invented the automatic car coupler which revolutionized railroad safety.
  43. Phillis Wheatley was a poet and master of the English Language. She write a poem in honor of George Washington and he praised her work.
  44. Richard Allen founded one of the first African -American Christian Churches. The first church was called the Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church (AME).
  45. John Russwurm and Samuel Cornish founded the first black newspaper in America.
  46. Dr. Shirley Jackson is an American physicist whose experiments in theoretical physics became the forerunner for the touch-tone telephone, the portable fax, caller ID, call waiting and fiber-optic cable.
  47. Marian Croak holds over 135 patents and is responsible for voice over Internet protocol which is the set of rules that makes it possible to use the Internet for telephone and videophone communication.
  48. Mary and Mildred Jackson invented the sanitary belt. Mary also invented the walker and toilet-tissue holder.
  49. Matthew Henson was at the first man to see the North Pole.
  50. James Weldon Johnson was a writer and musician that wrote the National Black Anthem, “Lift Every Voice and Sing”
  51. Carter G. Woodson is the “Father of Black History” and known for the development of “black historiography.” The is a body of history proven by the employment of scientific methods and procedures.
  52. Jack Johnson is the first back heavyweight champion of the world.
  53. Dr. George Grant invented the first golf tee. Before his invention, golfers carried buckets of sand from hole to hole and built sand mounds from which to hit the balls.
  54. Richard Spikes was an engineer who invented the beer tap and automobile gear shift and directional shift.
  55. Willis Johnson holds a patent for an improved egg beater which is considered an early version of the mixing machine.
  56. Benjamin Thorton invented the first answering machine. He created a device that could be attached to a telephone and set to record a message from a caller.


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4 Simple & Fun Kitchen Science Experiments for Young Kids

Science is such a great subject because it allows you to mix substances and create  simple and fun experiments.

My son and I did four experiments using ingredients from the kitchen. We enjoyed the process of gathering tools, reading instructions, mixing substances, and observing the outcome.

Join us in doing the experiments below!

Want More Tips? Get 3 Tools Every Household Needs to Boost Children’s Academic Skills

Let’s Get Started!

Milk Rainbow

Ingredients:

  • Sturdy Paper Plate
  • Milk
  • Food coloring
  • Dish soap
  • Cotton Swab

Method:

  1. Pour enough milk onto the plate to cover the surface.
  2. Drop food coloring into the center of the milk.
  3. Dip a cotton swab into dish soap and then touch the tip into the center of the food coloring.
  4. Watch what happens.
  5. You should see the colors move when the cotton swap touch the milk.

Why it Works?

  • The dish soap does not mix with the milk.
  • Instead, the dish soap floats on top and spreads.
  • As the dish soap spreads, it grabs the food coloring.
  • Soap attacks grease so its molecules go for the fat in the milk.
  • This causes movement and the colors to swirl around.
The yellow food coloring spreads in the milk and soap mixture.
The green food coloring is spreading in the milk and soap mixture.


The green circle is getting bigger.

 

Bubble Worms:

Ingredients:

  • Empty plastic water bottle
  • Scissors
  • An old sock
  • An aluminum / plastic container
  • Spoon
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1/2 cup dish soap

Method:

  1. Use scissors to cut the bottom off the water bottle.
  2. Place the elastic part of the sock over the bottom of the water bottle.
  3. Mix the water and dish soap in a container with a spoon.
  4. Dip the sock end of the bottle into the soapy mixture.
  5. Blow on the mouth of the bottle to create a long bubble worm.
    • Adults and older child should blow on the mouth.
    • I let my son blow ONCE just to experience it.
    • Sometimes small children will inhale on the mouth of the bottle instead of blowing out.
    • Let young children grab the bubbles at the bottom as you are blowing the mouth of the bottle.

Why it Works?

  • Water and soap are the basic ingredients for bubbles.
  • Bubbles are formed because of the air in them.
  • The surface of the sock on the water bottle has tiny holes.
  • Each of the holes are acting as individual bubble blowers.
  • Each hole is taking a bit of air in a layer of soap.
  • This combines to create the Bubble Worm.
Bubbles Galore!
My son had so much fun with this experiment!

 

Corn Starch Slime:

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup of Corn Starch
  • 1/2 cup Water
  • Bowl
  • Washable paint or food coloring (I prefer paint because it washes off easily).

Method:

  1. Dump corn starch in a bowl.
  2. Add water to the bowl
  3. Keep adding corn starch or water until it reaches the consistency you like.
  4. Add washable paint to mixture to make it colorful.

Why it Works?

  •  The grains of the cornstarch are NOT dissolved in the water.
  • The cornstarch grains are suspended and spread out in the water.
  • The cornstarch grains can hold its position in water when pressure is applied.
Creating the Cornstarch slime mixture!
Fun with Slime!

 

Sparkle Explosion:

Ingredients:

  • Vase or Cup
  • Baking soda
  • Vinegar
  • Food Coloring
  • Glitter
  • Pan

Method:

  1. Place 2-3 Tablespoons of baking soda in the bottom of the vase or cup.
  2. Put the vase or cup in the pan.
  3. Add 6-7 drops of food coloring and 1-2 teaspoons of glitter
  4. Pour in the 1/2 cup of vinegar.
  5. Watch for the sparkles.

Why it Works?

  • Baking Soda is a base and Vinegar is an acid.
  • When Baking Soda and Vinegar mix, the hydrogen ions in the vinegar react with the sodium and bicarbonate ions in the baking soda.
  • This mix is the result of two new substances called carbonic acid and sodium acetate.
  • There is a second reaction called decomposition reaction.
  • Decomposition reaction is when carbonic acid is formed.
  • The carbonic acid is decompose into water and carbon dioxide gas which causes the bubbling action.
Mixing the Vinegar and Baking!
Colorful Explosion!

Happy Experimenting!

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Effective and Fun Study Tips for Kids/Tweens/Teens

One day a group of moms and I were sharing information about our hobbies, jobs, and businesses. I told the group that I just started a YouTube Channel with Fun Accelerated Learning Tips for Kids. One mom asked me to make a video of Study Tips for Tweens/Teens. Excitement was my feeling because I love doing research, telling others what I have learned, and solving problems. My response was “I will work on it!”

Below is what I have experienced and found to be effective study habits and strategies for kids. 

Let’s Get Going!

Want More Tips? Get 3 Tools Every Household Needs to Boost Children’s Academic Success.

How Can I Help my Kid study?

Create conversations

You can assist your child with their school work by being involved in their studies. Ask your child about the topics they are learning about in school. Create conversations during dinner, car trips, or walking the dog about that topic and share what you know. If you don’t know much about the topic, have your kid teach you about the subject. You may also do your own research on the topic and share what you learned. 

Being Involved

Another way to assist your child is to attend parent conferences, open houses, or back-to-school nights. Students usually do better when they are supported in their academic life. As a parent, request meetings with teachers and other staff just to check your child’s progress. These meetings should happen whether your child is doing well or need some extra attention with school work. Open Houses or Back-to-School nights are when parents learn about school programs and polices and other opportunities your child may take advantage of.

Some Basic Necessities

 It is important for parents to provide the basic necessities children need to study such as nutritional meals and sleep. Nutritional meals can help your child focus and increase their attention span. Children need the proper amount of sleep in order to be alert during the day. Parents can help by turning off electronic devices at certain hours and creating time limitations.

Conducive Study Environment

Children should have a conducive studying environment. This includes having  the tempature between 74º and 77º.  It is helpful to place desks or tables away from distractions. Some parents find putting their child’s desk in the corner of their room away from the door and facing the wall helpful. Natural light is the best light to study with; however, if this is not available, ensure there is proper lighting  in your child’s study area.

Another tip is to have a distraction sheet near your child in case they have ideas pop in their head that are not related to school work. The child can write down their thoughts to prevent them from constantly thinking about it during study time. 

What are the habits of Successful Students?

Learning Outside the Classroom

 Two habits of successful students are learning outside the classroom and doing practice exams. Many successful students don’t just read the text book provided by their school, they take the initative to learn about a topic through reading other books, watching educational videos, and through experience. For example, if a child is learning about the American Civil Rights Movement, they may read about civil rights leader Congressman John Lewis, watch a documentary on the movement such as Eyes on the Prize, or visit a history museum. 

Practice Exams

Successful students often do practice exams. A practice exam can be informal when a parent is having an analytical dialogue or asking the child questions about the topic. It can also be formal where the parents create a practice test for their child. Practice tests can also be found in the back of other textbooks on the subject. Sometimes, you can find older editions of textbooks at your local library. 

How Can I Improve my Child’s Interest in Studies?

Children will be interested in their studies when there is a connection to what they are learning. I remember in high school disliking my geography class because I felt no connection to other countries. My interest in geography did not come alive until I started to travel internationally while in college. 

Let’s say your child is taking geography, then observe your child and see what they like and offer a connection. For the child who loves sports, have them research Sports played in the countries they are studying. If your daughter loves fashion, have them research the dress and fashion trends in the countries they are studying. Take it a step further and compare their findings to what happens in their home country. 

Another way to spark interest in studies is to encourage the child to find how it applies to their lives. Another subject I did not like in High School was Physics. However, if I would have done some hands on physics experiments then I would have been more engaged in my studies. For example, a great physics lesson is visiting a playground and studying how the two opposing forces of a seesaw lever and fulcrum (placed in the middle) counterbalance each other, creating a smooth ride through the air. My only exposure in high school to physics was in a book and I did not connect with it.

4 Ways to Improve Study Habits

Chunking information

Chunking is the process of breaking information into smaller pieces so the brain can digest it more easily. As a second grader writing a short story in class, I could not remember how to spell the word together. I got up and asked my teacher and she said three words “to” “get” “her.” From that time on, together has never been a word I have forgotten to spell. 

Chunking can be done in many ways. Kids can group together information by categories. For example, if your child is learning the symbols of the periodic table, they can remember them by groups. First they may learn the Group 1 which are the alkali metals, then move on the Group 2, the alkaline earth metals, and so on. 

Mind mapping

Mind mapping is one of my favorite ways to learn new things. It is an easy way to get information in and out of your brain. With mind maps you can study, take notes, create new ideas and plan projects. It consists of words, colors, lines, and pictures, which coincides with how our brain thinks.

There are 5 steps to Mind Mapping.

  1. Get a blank paper with colored pens, pencils, markers, or crayons.
  2. Draw a picture in the middle of the page that sums up your topic or subject.
  3. Draw thick curved, connected lines coming away from the picture, one of each for the main ideas you have about the topic.
  4. Name each of these ideas and it is helpful to draw pictures of each.
  5. For each of the ideas, draw other connected lines spreading like tree branches.
    • These represent the details.

We remember information better with pictures because it uses both sides of the brain. For example, it is natural for photographs, books and magazines to bring back our memories. If you want to remember all your favorite things, just draw a color coded picture like below.


If you wanted to Mind Map an article, use the basic elements below in your picture.

  1. What?
  2. Where?
  3. When?
  4. Who?
  5. Why?
  6. Conclusion

Creativity

Get creative with how new information is studied especially if it is a subject you are not fond of. If you love making home videos, create a show on the information you are studying and perform it for family and friends. Another idea is to make up questions about the subject and play a trivia game with friends in your class. Have all your friends bring a certain amount of questions for the game. If you like music, write a song about the information and put it to a catchy beat. 

Please note: As you are preparing for your creative way of studying, ensure you understand the material first to pinpoint any area of confusion you have. 

Get creative with how to study information

  1. Create a You Tube video teaching others about the topic.
  2. Create a commercial or role play on the information.

Schedule but with a Catch

It is helpful to set up a daily schedule of when you will study. However, it is important to include fun things like hobbies, time with friends or playing video games, and digital media time. You are more likely to complete tasks when you have playtime and work time on your schedule. This allows you to create in your mind something to look forward to. 

Association

One of the easiest ways to remember information is to associate it with something in which you are familiar. For example, make up a sentence using the letters in the formula to remember the area of a rectangle which is A = lw. The sentence could be Laura and Will had a big baby named Adam. Try to use items that you will remember like name of friends and family.

I hope you have found these tips helpful!!!

Use these studying strategies above to make studying revelent, interesting, and fun!

Happy Learning!

Other Resources

Thomas Frank’s video on How to Study Effectively: 8 Advanced Tips-College Info Geek 


Mind Maps for Kids by Tony Buzan

Don’t forget to check our two books, Teach your Toddler to Read Through Play and Fun and Easy Ways to Teach your Toddler to Write.

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4 Fun & Simple Activities/Games That will Teach Kids about Germs

germs activities

As adults, we most likely want  to prevent children from getting sick. It disturbs their playtime and they often look helpless lying in bed during an illness. One way to keep kids healthy is to teach them how to prevent germs.

I have provided 4 FUN and SIMPLE activities that will complete this mission! These activities will have your child wanting to help with chores and pinpoint the importance of good hygiene.

Learn How to Teach Kids to Cover their Mouths in a Fun Way

 

Let’s get started by answering basic questions about germs/microbes.

How are germs spread by hands?

 When you cough or sneeze, this is the lungs’ way of doing their job to force bad germs/microbes out. Some people cough in their hands if they don’t have a tissue.  Coughing in your hands leads to germs being left there. When you touch anything such as a doorknob, pen, sink, utensils, or someone else’s hand, you will spread germs.

How can you prevent germs from spreading?

 There are good and bad germs. You want to keep good germs and get rid of bad germs. Good germs can help make vitamins that your body needs. Foods that increase good bacteria or germs are asparagus, beans, spinach, and bananas.

One way to prevent bad germs from spreading is to cough or sneeze into a tissue or elbow. Furthermore, if you don’t cover up at all while sneezing and coughing, the germs can go really far. Some germs can travel 100 miles (160km) per hour and spread over 100,000 more.

Another way to prevent germs is to wash your hands frequently with soap. Soap helps to remove dirt and microbes. Hand washing should occur before eating, after using the bathroom, when playtime is complete, after using public transportation, or visiting public places.

How can kids prevent germs?

 Germs can enter the body through the mouth, nose, breaks in the skin, eyes and genitals (privates). Below are 5 ways to prevent germs…

  1. Using tissues to wipe and blow your nose.
  2. Staying home from school when you are sick.
  3. Keep hands out of mouth.
  4. Do not use other’s forks, spoons, or drink from the same cup. 
  5. Teach kids to wash their hands.

 

How do you teach a child to wash their hands?

Have kids do the following steps to wash their hands…

  1. Wet their hands with warm or cold water.
  2. Use soap to lather their hands while singing “Happy Birthday” twice.
  3. Scrub between fingers, on the backs of hands, and under nails.
  4. Rinse well and dry with a clean towel.

 Tip: Create a colorful chart with the steps above and display in all bathrooms.

Here’s a Great Book that Teaches Kids about Germs

Have you ever asked a child to wash their hands and they asked “Why?” The story, Do not lick this book* by Idan Ben-Barak and Julian Frost, provides a fun and engaging way to answer this question.

How this Book makes Learning about Germs Fun!

This book is about an oval shaped microbe character named Min, who teaches children about germs, by going on an adventure. Min begins her journey ON the book and involves readers by asking them to take her various places.

For example, the book says “Let’s take Min on an adventure! See the circle on the next page? That’s where Min lives. Touch the circle with your finger to pick her up. Min is now on your finger!”

Taking your Child on a Germ Journey

During Min’s travels, she meets friends and takes them along the way. Somehow Min and Rae end up on the reader’s shirt! At each stop, the authors show children a microscopic view of their destination. Additionally, commentary from other microbes explain how they function. While Min and Rae on are the reader’s shirt, one microbe says “Can you give me a hand spreading this dirt around?” Another microbe says “We’re making this shirt smell.”

While Min and friends are on the reader’s belly button, one microbe asks, “Did I tell you about the time soap got all the way in here? Another microbe replies “I don’t like scary stories!” This book teaches children the importance of brushing their teeth, washing clothes, and taking a bath in a humorous manner.

At the end, the authors show readers what microbes really look like and where they can be found.

Let’s apply it with 4 FUN Activities!

 Use the activities below to….

  1. Teach your Child about germs.
  2. Encourage them to help with chores.
  3. Promote Hygiene and Self-Care.

 

I do these activities with my son and he loves it!

Create the Germ/Microbe

  1. Have your child draw a germ/microbe.
  2. Tell the child to give the microbe a name.
  3. Have your child draw the microbe a friend and name it.
  4. Tell your child the microbe is going to travel to three places…
    • Their clothes
    • On their teeth
    • On their hands
  5. Tell your child you are going to get rid of the germs by doing the next three activities.

Laundry

  1. Explain to children that microbes get on our clothes and make them dirty and stinky.
  2. While doing laundry have your child help you put the clothes in the dryer and washing machine.
  3. While your child is handling the clothes say the following…
    • “Let’s get the Microbes off the clothes by putting them in washing machine.
  4. Make it fun and urgent by saying the following…
    • “Oh no! The microbes are multiplying let’s put them in the washing machine quickly!
    • Make it into a race against the Microbes.

Brushing Teeth

  1. Explain to children that microbes get on our teeth and cause tooth decay and cavities.
  2. Explain that cavities are holes in your teeth.
  3. The microbes also cause your breathe to stink.
  4. These microbes love sugars like candy.
  5. In order to get them off, they must floss and brush their teeth.
  6. While your child is brushing their teeth say the following..
    • “Hurry Hurry, the microbes are running because they know we are about to brush your teeth!
    • Let’s brush your teeth to remove them now!”
    • I hear the microbes saying, “No, No don’t brush your teeth! We don’t like the smell of toothpaste!”
  7. When your child is rinsing their mouth and spitting, say the following…
    • “The microbes are down the drain and they are yelling “No, No!”

Washing Hands

  1. Explain to children that microbes get on our hands as we touch various things like the doorknob and sink.
  2. We often touch our noses, mouths, and eyes allowing microbes to come into our bodies and make us sick.
  3. We need to wash our hands to decrease our chances of getting sick.
  4. While your child is washing their hands, laugh and say the following…
    • “We are going to get those microbes by washing our hands with soap!”
    • “The microbes are scared of soap so let’s keep scrubbing!”
  5. When your child is rinsing their hands, say the following…
    • “The microbes are down the drain and they are yelling “No, No!”
    • “Yes! We conquered the microbes!”

When I forget to do these activities, my son usually asks me to play the Microbe Games!

Get creative with your children on how to remove microbes!

Bonus Tip: 

Here are Fun Chore Charts for Kids of All Ages

Happy Cleaning!

Don’t forget to check our two books, Teach your Toddler to Read Through Play and Fun and Easy Ways to Teach your Toddler to Write.

 

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