100 Children’s Books About Money

I remember at the age of 17 my older brother, Linsey, gave me the book, Rich Dad Poor Dad by Robert Kiyosaki. This book changed my perspective about how I thought about money.

One point that stuck with me was when you are an adult your report card is your credit score. I found this statement fascinating and I made the decision to do two things after that..

  • To strive to have an excellent credit score as an adult
  • To teach my children financial literacy

Although my son is a preschooler, I have introduced him to money through role plays, having him count and earn real money, and reading books. 

I would like all children to be exposed to financial literacy. My contribution is by compiling this list of Children’s Book about Money. 

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Learn how my three-year-old son has the ability to read on a 3rd grade level. Go to the bottom of this post to access the First Chapter of the ebook, Teach Your Toddler to Read Through Play: A Detailed Account with over 130 Games/Activities, Tips, and Resources for FREE!

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Let’s Get Started!

  1. Gabby Invents the Perfect Hair Bow by Erica Swallow/Li Zeng

    • At five years old, Gabby Goodwin can’t stop losing her hair bows everywhere she goes. She and her mother invent a new kind of bow that doesn’t fall out. Read this book to see if their idea works.
  2. Lily Learn about Wants and Needs by Lisa Bullard/Christine Schneider

    • Lily wants a new bike, a new raincoat, and ice cream. But how many of these things does she need? As Lily and her dad drive around town, Lily soon discovers that wants and needs are different things. 
  3. Jason Saves the Environment with Entrepreneurship by Erica Swallow/Li Zeng

    • Problem-solver Jason Li has been on a mission to pay for his own lunch since he started school. He has an idea that helps him achieve his goal and save the planet.
  4. Growing Money: A Complete Investing Guide for Kids by Gail Karlitz/Debbie Honig

    • This book is a complete guide explaining in kid-friendly terms all about savings accounts, bonds, stocks, and even mutual funds!
  5. Lemonade in Winter: A Book About Two Kids Counting Money by Emily Jenkin/G. Brian Karas

    • A lemonade stand in winter? Yes, that’s exactly what Pauline and John-John intend to have, selling lemonade and limeade. Children will learn about simple math concepts in a fun way with this book.
  6. Curious About Money by Mary E. Reid

    •  Children will learn how people, money, and history intersect, and what’s current about currency.
  7.  It’s Not Fair!: A Book About Having Enough by Caryn Riverdeneria/Isabel Moñoz

    • Roxy Ramirez has saved up for weeks to buy a chemistry set, and now she’s headed to the toy store to buy it! There’s only one problem. She keeps running into friends who are in trouble, and need her to dip into her savings to help. Will she have enough money left over to buy something for herself?
  8.  The Squirrel Manifesto by Rich Edelman/David Zabocki

    • Just as a squirrel gathers nuts to prepare for the winter—eating some now and storing some for later—kids can learn the value of money by spending some of their allowance now and saving the rest for later using animals as examples.
  9. Kidpreneurs: Young Entrepreneurs With  Big Ideas! by Adam Toren/Matthew Toren

    • This book teaches kids about starting, managing, and growing a successful business venture.
  10. What Can You Do With Money? by Jennifer Larson

    • This basic introduction to earning and spending explains how people earn incomes in exhange for their work and skill. It then explains the economic choices people make in saving or spending their income.
  11. The Big Buck Adventure by Shelley Gill/Deborah Tobola/Grace Lin

    • One little girl and one very big dollar set out on a great adventure at the store.
      What will she do with so many choices, and only one buck? Read this book to find out.
  12. Let’s Meet Ms. Money: One Step Towards Financial Literacy by Rich Grant

    • Let’s Meet Ms. Money is a children’s picture book that teaches children about money. Kids will learn what money looks like, how to count it, how and why we use money, and how we earn it.
  13.  Liktoon’s Boat: A Children’s Storybook about money, entrepreneurship, and teamwork

    • This book addresses earnings, savings, addition, subtraction, business, profits, and expenses through the characters’ adventure.
  14. A Million Gold Coins: Teaching Kids about Happiness and Money by Sigal Adler

    • Two farmers are not happy about working so hard for money. However, they may be looking for happiness in the wrong places.
  15. Everything a Kid Needs to Know about Money – Children’s Money and Saving Reference by Baby Professor

    • Teach your kids the basics about finances with this book. There’s no such thing as too early when it comes to these things. Properly seal the deal about money and other possessions by introducing this book.
  16. I Got Bank! What my Granddad Taught Me About Money by Teri Williams

    •  At ten years old, Jazz  Ellington, has over $2,000 in the bank, and his savings keep growing. His granddad taught him to save his allowance and set up a bank account. This book increases financial awareness while sharing the lives of two African-American boys growing up in the city.
  17. Dimes: To Teach Your Child About Money by Rebecca D. Turner/Lacey Braziel

    • This book teaches discipline, delayed gratification, and how good it feels to give to those in need. Dimes can teach your child the habits that will allow them to have a more financially secure and fulfilling life.
  18. Sebastian Creates A Sock Company by Erica Swallow/Li Zeng

    • Five-year-old Sebastian Martinez, with the help of his older brother, turns his love for socks into a business that not only makes wacky socks, but also enables the duo to finally revamp the school dress code. 
  19. Those Shoes by Noah Jones

    • Jeremy wants a pair of the shoes everyone at school is wearing. Jeremy’s grandma says they don’t have room for wants just needs. Read how Jeremy and his grandma navigate through this dilemma.
  20. Money for Puppy by D.L. Madson

    • This is an excellent book about saving money for something you want.
  21. The Wrong Shoes: A Book About Money and Self-Esteem by Caryn Rinadeneira

    • The Wrong Shoes teaches kids about money, hard work, self-esteem, and the real value of the things we own.
  22. The Penny Pot: Counting Coins by Stuart J. Murphy/Lynne Woodcock Cravath

    • This is a great book that shows kids how to count money how it is used, and saving to get what you want.
  23. Lemonade for Sale by Stuart Murphy/Tricia Tusa

    • Four kids and their sidekick, Petey the Parrot, run a lemonade stand. They create a bar graph to track the rise and fall of their lemonade sales.
  24. Sluggers’ Car Wash by Stuart J. Murphy/Barney Saltzberg

    • The 21st Street Sluggers’ shirts are worn-out and dirty. They need new ones, but they have no money. Children will learning to count money and make change.
  25. Arthur’s Pet Business by Marc Brown

    • Arthur starts his own petsitting business to show Mom and Dad that he can be responsible! Between a boa constrictor, an ant farm, and a group of frogs, he’s got his hands full! Can Arthur still prove he is responsible?
  26. One Proud Penny by Sandy Riegel/Serge Bloch

    • This book teaches kids that pennies are worth a lot and how it’s life can be exciting.
  27.  Money Math: Addition and Subtraction by David Adler/Edward Miller

    • Children will get an introduction to American units of money; and how they combine to make a price. They will also learn basic money symbols and the math inherent in shopping.
  28.  The Go-Around Dollar by Barbara Johnston-Adams/Joyce Audy Zarins

    • Children will learn how the dollar is made, the meaning of the symbols that are shown on the front and back of the dollar, and how long the average dollar stays in circulation?
  29. Arthur’s Funny Money by William Hoban

    • Arthur attempts to earn enough money to buy a t-shirt and cap, assisted by his sister Violet. Children will learn simple business concepts by reading this story.
  30. The Original Story of the Piggy Bank: The Beginning of a Legend! by Lance Douglas

    • This book gives background information on the piggy bank. It also contains powerful lessons of discipline, sacrifice and responsibility.
  31. You Wouldn’t Live Without Money by Professor Alex Woolf/David Antram

    • This book uses humorous cartoons  to tell the story of money, from early bartering to the making of metal and paper currencies.
  32. DK Eyewitness Books: Money: Discover the Fascinating  Story of Money from Silver Ingot to Smart Cards by Joe Cribb

    • Children will learn about the earliest forms of money to the banking systems we have today.
  33.  Dollars and Sense: A Kid’s Guide to Using – Not Losing- Money by Elaine Scott/David Clark

    • Dollars & Sense is a basic instruction manual for money that will teach readers about the history of money, the way the American economy works, and how to make important decisions about personal finance.
  34.  Dollars and Sense by Stan Berenstain/Jan Berenstain

    • Papa thinks it’s time to teach Brother and Sister how to budget their money. Children journey with the cubs on their process to understand the value of a dollar.
  35.  A Chair for My Mother by Vera B. Williams

    • After their home is destroyed by a fire, Rosa, her mother, and grandmother save their coins to buy a really comfortable chair for all to enjoy.
  36. Rock, Brock, and the Savings Shock by Sheila Bair/Barry Gott

    • Rock and Brock are twins and their grandpa offers them a plan―for ten straight weeks on Saturday he will give them each one dollar. But there is a catch!  Each buck they save, he’ll match it quick. If they spend it, there’s no extra dough.
  37. When Times are Tough by Yanitzia Canetti/Romont Willy

    • This book follows a family that faces very real economic challenges. They show how they are able to overcome with each other.
  38. The Kids’ Money Book: Earning, Saving, Spending, Investing, Donating by Jamie McGillian

    • This book explains how to create a budget, make money, invest your earnings, and donate to charity. It also teaches kids the difference between needs and wants and getting the most from an allowance.
  39. Once Upon A Dime: A Math Adventure by Nancy Kelly Allen/Adam Doyle

    • This book is about a  farmer discovering  trees that grows different types of money.  This book teaches kids about the value of money
  40. How to Turn $100 to $1,000,000: Earn! Save! Invest! by Jenna McKenna/Jeannine Glista

    • Children will learn the basics of earning, saving, spending, and investing money.
  41.  Ella Earns Her Own Money by Lisa Bullard/Mike Moran
    • Ella wants a soccer ball, but she doesn’t have enough money to buy one. She decides to earn her own money. Will she earn enough to buy the ball? Read this book to find out!
  42.  Kyle Keeps Track of Cash by Lisa Bullard/Mike Byrne

    • Kyle’s club is going camping and all the kids will sell Cool Candy to earn money for the trip. Kyle needs to find buyers for ten boxes of candy. Can he keep track of his cash and join his friends on the camping trip? Read this book to find out!
  43. What Does It Means to be an Entrepreneur by Rana Diorio/Emma Dryden

    • When Rae witnesses an ice cream and dog mishap, she’s inspired to create a solution to help get dogs clean. Rae draws on her determination and everyone else in her community when she learns what it means to be an entrepreneur.
  44.  A Smart Girl’s Guide: Money: How to Make It, Save It, and Spend It by Nancy Holyoke/Brigette Barrager
    • Children will learn how to not only spend money, but also how to earn it. The quizzes, tips, and helpful quotes from other girls will make learning about money management easy and fun.
  45. The History of Money by Martin Jenkins/Satoshi Kitamura

    • This book teaches children the following questions about money:  When did we start using it? And why? What does money have to do with writing? And how do taxes and interest work?
  46. Curious George Saves his Pennies by H.A. Rey

    • When George decides to save up for a red train in the toy store, he doesn’t realize how long it will take or how hard he’ll have to work for his money. Read this book and find out if he gets the train.
  47.  Piggy Bank Problems by Fran Manuskkin/Tammie Lyon
    • Katie’s dad works at a bank  but she prefers to keep her money in her piggy bank. Read about what happens when she drops her piggy and it breaks?
  48.  Deena’s Lucky Penny by Barbara Derubertis/Cynthia Fisher

    • Deena has a big problem. Her mom’s birthday is coming, but she has no money to buy a present! Find out how she solves the problem by reading this book.
  49. Follow Your Money: Who Gets it, Who Spends it, Where Does it Go? by Kevin Sylvester/Michael Hlinka, Julia Beck

    • Find out what happens to your money after you hand it to the cashier. What happens to that money once it leaves your hands? Who actually pockets it or puts it into the bank? Read this book to answer these questions.
  50.  Currency by Andrew Einspruch
    • The book gives an introduction to currency through the history of money around the world, minting coins and printing paper money.
  51. Feeding Piggy by Kathy Mashburn/Freida Talley

    • Maddy has a piggy bank named Piggy. One morning while feeding Piggy coins for breakfast, Maddy discovers how coins, like people, come in different shapes and sizes.
  52.  A Dollar, A Penny How Much and How by Lerner Publications
    • This humorous book shows young readers how to count and combine pennies, nickels, fives, tens, and more!
  53.  Sophie the Zillonaire by Lara Bergen/Laura Tallardy

    • When Sophie finds fifty dollars on the sidewalk, it gives her a great idea for a new name: Sophie the Zillionaire! In order to keep the name Sophie the Zillionaire, Sophie has to make more money — and fast.
  54. Berenstain Bears Trouble with Money by Stan Berenstain

    • Mama and Papa are worried that Brother and Sister seem to think money grows on trees. The cubs decide to start their very own businesses, from a lemonade stand to a pet-walking service.
  55.  Just Saving Money by Mercer Mayer

    • Little Critter® wants a new skateboard and Dad tells him that he needs to save his own money to buy it! From feeding the dog to selling lemonade, Little Critter learns the value of a dollar.
  56. Lots and Lots of Coins by Margarette S. Reid/True Kelley

    • This book is about a boy spending the day with Dad coin collecting!  He finds out about the value of coins, what people used before coins, and why historical images and people appear on coins.
  57.  A Dollar for Penny by Julie Glass/Joy Allen

    • A young girl sets up a lemonade stand and sells enough cups of refreshment to add up to a dollar.  This story combines the teaching of addition with  childhood entrepreneurship!  
  58. The Young Investor by Katherine Bateman

    • The book explains the concept of money and  how saving works based on the concepts of simple and compound interest. Children then learn where Wall Street is located, what stocks and bonds do, and, the right way to buy or sell a stock, mutual fund, or savings bond.
  59. You can’t buy a Dinosaur with a Dime by Harriet Ziefert

    •  Pete saves his allowance and spends too much of it. He then has second thoughts and starts over. Children will learn how he strategizes over future purchases. 
  60. Not Your Parents’ Money Book: Making, Saving, and  Spending Your Own Money by Jean Chatzsky/Erwin Haya

    • This book will reach kids before bad spending habits can get out of control. With answers and ideas from real kids, this grounded approach to spending and saving will be a welcome change for kids who are inundated by a consumer driven culture.
  61.  Money Math with Sebastian Pig and Friends by Jill Anderson
    • This book introduces children to identifying, counting and comparing money through a farmer’s market trip with Sebastian Pig and Louie.
  62.  Money Madness by David Adler and Edward Miller
    • Children will be provided with a guide to economics and the purpose and value of money with this book.
  63. Coins and Other Currency by Tamra Orr

    • Follow a class of fifth-graders as they figure out the world of finance, including earning, budgeting, and saving to investing and collecting coins from around the world.
  64.  Show Me the Money by David Alder

    • Show Me the Money takes technical terms and breaks it down with easy-to-understand text, diagrams, and illustrations making a formerly dry subject interesting and relevant to kids
  65.  One Cent, Two Cents, Old Cent New Cent: All About Money by Bonnie Worth/Aristides Ruiz
    • The Cat in the Hat disqualifies the notion that money grows on trees with the study of money and its history.
  66.  Money, Money Honey Bunny by Marilyn Sadler/Roger Bollem
    • Honey Bunny Funny Bunny has a lot of money. She saves some and spends some on herself and friends. This is a rhyming book about spending and saving, told through the eyes of animals.
  67.  Mr. Chickee’s Funny Money by Christopher Paul Curtis

    • Mr. Chickee, a blind man in the neighborhood, gives 9-year-old Steven a mysterious bill with 15 zeros on it and the image of a familiar face. Could it be a quadrillion dollar bill? Could it be real? Read this book to find out.
  68. Cash, Credit Cards or Checks by Nancy Leewen

    • Children will learn how people pay for the things they buy by writing a check, paying with a debit card, paying with a credit card, and paying with cash withdrawn from an ATM.
  69. Taxes, Taxes!: Where the Money Goes by Nancy Leewen

    • Provides an introduction to taxes, including some of the products and services that citizens may receive including schools, roads, and national defense.
  70. In the Money: A Book About Banking by Nancy Leewen

    • Provides an introduction to banks and banking, including what the workers do, why customers come into banks, and explains what happens to old money.
  71.  The Kids Guide to Money Cent$ by Keltie Thomas/Stephen MacEachern

    • The Money Cent$ gang, three kids with very different money “personalities,” will help teach your child about money.
  72.  All About Money by Erin Roberson
    • This book introduces children to money,  while describing the concepts of earning, saving, and spending.
  73. Money Sense for Kids by Hollis Harman

    • This book answers the following questions about money: How and where is it printed? What do all those long numbers and special letters on currency mean? How are the newly designed bills improvements over the old ones?How can banks afford to pay interest?
  74. The Kids’ Money Book: Earning, Saving, Spending, Investing, Donating by Jamie Kyle McGillian

    •  This books explains how to create a budget, make money, invest your earnings, and donate to charity. 
  75. Money: A Rich History by Jon R. Anderson

    • Children will learn about the history of money with tons of cool facts,  illustrations, and photographs of coins and money from all over the world.
  76. Follow the Money by Loreen Leady

    • George, a newly minted quarter on his way to the bank, has quite a day. He’s about to be traded, spent, lost, found, donated, dropped into a vending machine, washed in a washing machine, and generally passed all around town.
  77. Double Fudge by Judy Blume

    • Fudge is obsessed with money. He’s making his own “Fudge Bucks” and has plans to buy the entire world. However, things get crazy once his family gets involved.
  78. The Big Buck Adventure by Shelley Gill

    • Follow the journey of a girl who tries to decide what she can get with her dollar in a candy shop, toy store, deli, and pet department.
  79.  A Dollar for Penny by Julie Grass/Joy Allen

    • On a summer day, a young girl sets up a lemonade stand and sells enough cups  to add up to a dollar.  This story combines the teaching of addition with a traditional rite of childhood entrepreneurship!  
  80. My Rows and Piles of Coins by Tolowa Mollel/E.B. Lewis

    • Saruni is saving coins for a red and blue bicycle. How happy he will be when he can help his mother carry heavy loads to market on his very own bicycle. How disappointed he is to discover that he hasn’t saved nearly enough!
  81. Isabel’s Car Wash by Sheila Bair/Judy Stead

    • The Nelly Longhair doll is on sale at Murphy’s Toys for ten dollars, but Isabel has only fifty cents. Isabel decides to start a car wash business. Will Isabel  earn enough for the Nelly doll?
  82. Prices, Prices, Prices by David Adler

    • In simple language  and colorful pictures, this book gives an introduction to economics explaining the basic laws of supply and demand.
  83.  Uncle Jed’s Barbershop by Margaree King Mitchell/James Ransome
    • This is a story of a man who spends his life struggling, saving, and sacrificing to build and own his own barbershop. Although there were many racial difficulties that stood in his way,  he opens the doors of his new shop  at the age of seventy-nine.
  84. Round and Round the Money Goes: What Money Is and How We Use It by Melvin Berger/Gilda Berger

    • This book explains the development of money from its origins in the barter system to its modern usage as cash, checks, and credit cards.
  85. How the Second Grade Got $8,205.50 to Visit the Statue of Liberty by Nathan Zimelman/Bill Slavin

    • A second grade class wants to visit the Statue of Liberty. They try to earn money for the trip by collecting paper, running a lemonade stand, sitting babies, walking dogs, and selling candy.
  86.  Benny’s Pennies by Pat Brisson

    • Benny McBride starts his day with five new pennies and is determined to spend them all. His family wants him to buy certain items. Will he be able to fulfill their requests?
  87. If You Made a Million by David Schwartz/Steven Kellogg

    • Have you ever wanted to make a million dollars? Marvelosissimo, the Mathematical Magician, is able to explain how to  earn money, invest it, accrue dividends and interest, and watch savings grow. 
  88. National Geographic Kids Everything Money: A Wealth of Facts, Photos, and Fun by Kathy Furgang

    • Kids will learn about money around the world from a National Geographic expert. This book is packed with fun facts and amazing photographs.
  89. My Pink Piggy Bank by Rozanne Williams

    • The book teaches kids the importance of saving.
  90. The Piggybank Blessing by Stan and Jan Berenstain

    • The Bear cubs like to spend money. Find out if the new piggy bank Mama bought will help teach Brother and Sister about saving money.
  91. The History of Money by Patricia Armentrout

    • This book examines the history of money, including the barter system, early trade in North America, unusual types of money such as huge stone disks and salt bars, and the first paper money.
  92. American Currency by Patricia Armentrout

    • This book introduces kids to the characteristics and values of the different coins and paper money used as currency in the United States.
  93.  A Quarter from the Tooth fairy by Caren Holzman

    • This book uses simple math concepts in an easy-to-read story plus six pages of math activities for parents and children to enjoy together.
  94. Pigs Will Be Pigs: Fun with Math and Money by Amy Axelrod/Sharon McGinley-Nally

    • The pigs are very hungry, and there’s no food in the house. Mr. Pig suggests eating out but there is no money! The family goes on a money hunt. Read to see if they find what they are looking for.
  95. The Monster Money Book by Loreen Leedy

    • This book teaches children about  borrowing, saving, and spending money. It  also makes many connections to the real world.
  96.  Jasmine Launches a Startup (Entrepreneurship Books for Kids) by Barhar Karroum/Jesus Vazquez Prada
    • This book will teach children how to start a business, to focus on a specific market, and to take risks.
  97. Kid Start-Up: How YOU Can Become an Entrepreneur by Mark Cuban/Shaan Patel

    • The book will help children how to discover a winning idea, launch their business, and start making money.
  98.  Rachel Turns Her Passion Into Business (Entrepreneur Kid) by Erica Swallow/Li Zeng
    • Teen lacrosse player Rachel Zietz takes an entrepreneurship course and realizes she can blend the worlds of business and fun by creating a lacrosse equipment company. 
  99.  Marvel’s of Money for Kids: Five Fully Illustrated Stories about Money and Financial Decisions for Life by Paul Nourigat

    • This is a book about money in which kids will like to read. There are five stories with conclusions and lessons learned. 
  100.  Why is there money? A Visual and Poetic Journey Through the History of Money by Paul Nourigat

    • This book teaches kids the history of money. It teaches the evolution of money in a simple way.

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Teach Your Toddler to Read Through Play – Over 130 Games/Activities and Tips

Your three-year-old son can read on a third grade level? How?

Just this past weekend, I saw my three-year-old son, Cory, reading a book to his Sunday School teacher and a group of kids.  As soon as the teacher saw me, she said “This child can read at three-years-old? How did you do this?” When someone asks me this, my short answer is always by making reading fun, exposure to a variety of books, and playing with words.

Then later that day, I took my son to another child’s home for a birthday party. The kids were having so much fun playing inside and outside. At one point, Cory was  playing with the Leapfrog letter set at the refrigerator and spelling words. He asked the birthday boy’s mother, who is a teacher, for the letter T in order to spell the word gift.  After spelling, the boy’s mom approached me and said “I can’t believe your son spelled gift!” I replied by saying “Yes, he loves to read and spell!” She said “How did you do this?” Again, I gave her my normal answer.

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Is your son a genius?

Parents and teachers are usually amazed to know that my son was reading at 21 months. Right now, he can read on a third-grade level. They often say “He is a genius!” I think ALL CHILDREN ARE BORN GENUISES! Cory was born with the same capilibities as every other child. He was just exposed to words and language in a fun way at an early age. In my opinion, any child can do this!

Why did you teach your son to read so early?

It was not my intention to teach Cory to read as a toddler. I didn’t think he would learn the alphabet until the age of three or four. My objective was to expose him to words and language so he wouldn’t be a late communicator. In my experience as a social worker/play therapist, I noticed children who couldn’t speak would resort to hitting or kicking out of frustration. However, once they developed language this behavior would decrease because they could communicate their needs and wants. 

As I started exposing Cory to words through play and reading, I noticed that he liked what I was doing. After reading a book to him as a baby, he would take the book and give it back to me. He wanted me to read it again. I remember my husband read the book, Brown Bear Brown Bear What Do You See ten times in a row to Cory at one time. He enjoyed the interactive activities and games we played, which I used to exposed him to new words daily. He has always loved playing with letters, learning the phonics, and blending sounds. Finally, there came a point were he had a desire to seek meaning from words through reading!

Watch my three-year-old son read the book, Charlotte’s Web. A book for children ages 8 and up.

Why is reading a struggle for some kids?

Reading is boring.

Some kids think reading is boring. Many young children spend their days playing. Then once the child turns five or six-years-old, adults tell the child that they have to sit down, focus, and learn to read. Learning to read can be a frustrating process for some kids. It takes time and concentration because one of the best ways to become a better reader is to read. This can be difficult for the child who is a kinesthetic learner, as most kids are, and loves to be physical and experience what they are learning. 

My Child is not trying hard enough

Sometimes when a child is behind on their appropriate reading level, the teacher will tell the parents. Parents usually get nervous and upset by this information, and these emotions transfer to the child. During home reading sessions, the parents get frustrated with the child because “they are not trying hard enough.” This most often leads kids to having a negative view of reading. They will often tell their parents “I hate reading!” In turn the parents become more upset because their child is behind their classmates and they are unable to motivate the child to read.

Parents don’t know where to start

Teaching a child to read can be an overwhelming task. First, you have to learn the alphabet, phonics, blending sounds, sight words, and the various rules of the English language. Parents may have a child that knows the alphabet and phonics but is having difficulty with teaching them sight words. Flashcards are often used to teach sight words, but again the child thinks this is SO BORING!

Furthermore, if a child is reading a book with a lot of words they are unfamiliar with, they may get irritated and want to do something else. Additionally, how do you explain that the word bat can be an animal and a tool used for baseball? Oh and when you see the letters PH together, you should make the F sound. Also, C can make the short sound like in cat or the long sound like in cell.

My Child won’t sit during reading time.

I have heard many parents complain that their child doesn’t want to sit and read an entire book. As parents are reading, the child may look in space and not pay attention. Or if the child can read, they get distracted by something happening in the background. Sometimes a parent may read the first few pages of a book to a child but the story line is boring which causes their mind to wonder.

My Child is uninterested in reading about the topic.

A big reason why some kids don’t like to read is because they are uninterested in the topic. This often happens when kids have to read school textbooks or remember facts that they have no connection to. The kids are wondering why they have to know this information. Parents and teachers are trying to get their children to retain the information and it is just not happening for the child. This can be a pretty difficult situation to navigate.

Below are questions many parents have about reading…

What age should a child learn to read?

Most kids start learning to read at 6 or 7. Some kids start earlier at the age of 4 or 5. I believe children have the ability to recognize words earlier. My son started recognizing words at nine months. 

One day my son and I were playing in the basement. I asked him to get the book, Brown Bear Brown Bear out of the bin. Out of the 12 books in the bin, he picked the correct title.

My son was able to blend sounds to make words at 21 months. The only reason he did this so early was because he was exposed to it as a baby. However, all children learn at different times and levels. They also learn with various methods. It is important to concentrate on your child’s level and their readiness to learn.

Watch the video below to see my son spelling at 21 months old

How can I help my child learn to read?

There are countless ways to teach kids to read. Kids learn through reading, talking with others, story-telling, workbooks, digital media and technology, learning phonics and sight words, blending sounds, writing, and asking questions. 

I used playful in-depth learning to teach Cory to read. This included fun activities like singing, dancing, playing with blocks, magnetic tiles, Playdoh, drawing, games, role- play, writing stories with paint and sidewalk chalk, going outside to play and reading. It is important to read books that interest your child so they will gain the curiosity to seek meaning from words.

What if my child is not interested in a certain topic?

Children will be interested in reading when there is a connection to what they are learning. I remember in high school disliking my geography class because I felt no connection to other countries. My interest in geography did not come alive until I started to travel internationally while in college. 

Let’s say you want your child to learn about other countries, then observe your child and see what they like and offer a connection. For the child who loves sports, have them read about Sports played in the countries. If your daughter loves princesses, have them read about princesses around the world.

How long should a child read each day?

Children should read at least 20 minutes a day. However, if a parent is doing formal reading lessons then all you need is 15 minutes a day. Outside of the 15 minutes, please know that reading can take place anywhere. Children can read a dinner menu, playground signs, grocery list, captions on their favorite cartoon. 

How do I help my child who is struggling with reading?

First, you must define what struggling means. If you are comparing your child with other kids in the classroom or the national standards of reading and they are below their level, then yes they maybe struggling. However, if you don’t compare them to anyone, you may realize that they just need more time to get the concept. 

When a child needs more time with reading, ensure you are teaching to their learning styles. 

Auditory learners love to learn through hearing. Great activities for them would be to read books based on songs and retelling stories you have read and adding music with DIY instruments like banging the bottom of an oatmeal container. Visual learners use sight to learn. They would enjoy drawing and painting colorful stories and doing word puzzles and games with colorful pictures. Kinesthetic learners love explore the world through touch and movement. Try building model sets based on books and doing a Treasure Word Hunt Game would be fun for them. 

In my opinion, the best way for children to learn to read is through playful in-depth and natural wholesome interaction. It is the best way to create a desire in children to read. 

This is why I have written the ebook, Teach Your Toddler to Read Through Play: A Detailed Account With Over 130 Games/Activities, Tips, and Resources.

My goal is to help you expose your child to words and reading in a fun way. This book will take you through a step by step process of how I taught my son to read. It gives you games/activities to do with your child along the way to make reading a process that is fun, natural, and interesting! It will help spark your child’s curiosity in wanting to seek meaning from words which is essentially reading. 

This book provides the following…

  • A detailed account of how I taught my son to read
  • Over 130 Reading Games/Activities and Resources
  • How to expose your child to new words through play
  • The types of books to start your child’s reading journey
  • How to encourage curiosity in your child
  • Child brain development and how to develop faster connections in your baby’s brain
  • How to expose newborn and babies to words through play and bonding
  • How my son was able to recognize words as a baby
  • How to make rereading books fun for you and your child
  • Simple ways to create a literacy rich home
  • The MOST important thing you can do as a parent to encourage reading in your household
  • How songs and dancing assisted in teaching my son to read.
  • How to take full advantage of the FREE Services at your Local library
  • How Physical Activities can boost your child’s reading skills
  • How to Teach the Alphabet in a Fun Way
  • How to Teach the Phonics, Blending Sounds, and Sight Words in a Fun Way
  • The three basic learning styles in children
  • How to determine your child’s learning style
  • How to expose children to new concepts aligned with their learning style
  • How children with certain learning styles tend to communicate
  • The toys/activities children with certain learning styles tend to favor
  • How to make learning fun and playful for children
  • How to determine the best time to teach your child
  • How to execute Fun In-Depth Learning
  • How to use the body’s senses to teach your child
  • How to combine In-depth learning and learning styles during play
  • How to incorporate digital media in your child’s learning
  • How to teach a child with more than one learning style
  • How to Structure your Day
  • How to progress to teaching your child the phonics
  • How Writing and Art can build a child’s reading skills
  • How to Use Real World Experiences and Field Trips to expose children to language.
  • How to Choose Books your Child will Like to Read.
  • Strategies for When your Child Loses Interest in Reading.
  • Examples of toys we used
  • Examples of books we read through our journey
  • Once your child begins to read, how to continue to build their skills.

Here is What Others are Saying About the Book

“This was a wonderfully detailed account of not only how to teach your child to read, but also how to connect with your child, support your child in a lifetime of loving to learn, and use your time caring for your child in a meaningful, fulfilling way. I am inspired as a mother, and I wish I’d known about this sooner!

I thought it was very well written, and the flow was perfect. The book flowed seamlessly from one chapter to the next, and I felt like it was organized perfectly.”

-Stacey

“This is a wonderful guidebook for parents who want to help their children begin learning at an early age through play. It is an introduction on how to nurture a love of learning and proficiency in reading in children, which in turn will open the door for your child to be exposed to and learn about a variety of topics.  Andrea incorporates several learning styles in order to pave the way for a lifetime of learning.

I look forward to incorporating some of these techniques into playtime with my little learners.”

-Danielle J.

“This book documents the journey of an engaged parent who used creative and fun ways to introduce her son to books. This led to the child’s continuous interest in letters, words, sentences and naturally, reading. If you are willing to invest the time in incorporating the tips in this book with your child, he or she will also develop an interest in books and learn to read during the early stages of brain development. This book is an excellent example of the African Proverb “Each One Teach One.”

-Linsey Mills

This is a great e-book for parents with children ages 0-7! Invest in your child’s future. Reading is the most powerful tool to promote creativity, increase brain power, and it helps your child express themselves better! The best way to teach a child to spell and grammar rules is not through flashcards and worksheets but through reading and play!

Not Sure Yet? Then Complete the Form at the Bottom of this Post to Read the First Chapter for Free!

The book is available on Amazon! Click the image above to access the link.


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4 Fun & Simple Activities/Games That will Teach Kids about Germs

germs activities

As adults, we most likely want  to prevent children from getting sick. It disturbs their playtime and they often look helpless lying in bed during an illness. One way to keep kids healthy is to teach them how to prevent germs.

I have provided 4 FUN and SIMPLE activities that will complete this mission! These activities will have your child wanting to help with chores and pinpoint the importance of good hygiene.

Learn How to Teach Kids to Cover their Mouths in a Fun Way

 

Let’s get started by answering basic questions about germs/microbes.

How are germs spread by hands?

 When you cough or sneeze, this is the lungs’ way of doing their job to force bad germs/microbes out. Some people cough in their hands if they don’t have a tissue.  Coughing in your hands leads to germs being left there. When you touch anything such as a doorknob, pen, sink, utensils, or someone else’s hand, you will spread germs.

How can you prevent germs from spreading?

 There are good and bad germs. You want to keep good germs and get rid of bad germs. Good germs can help make vitamins that your body needs. Foods that increase good bacteria or germs are asparagus, beans, spinach, and bananas.

One way to prevent bad germs from spreading is to cough or sneeze into a tissue or elbow. Furthermore, if you don’t cover up at all while sneezing and coughing, the germs can go really far. Some germs can travel 100 miles (160km) per hour and spread over 100,000 more.

Another way to prevent germs is to wash your hands frequently with soap. Soap helps to remove dirt and microbes. Hand washing should occur before eating, after using the bathroom, when playtime is complete, after using public transportation, or visiting public places.

How can kids prevent germs?

 Germs can enter the body through the mouth, nose, breaks in the skin, eyes and genitals (privates). Below are 5 ways to prevent germs…

  1. Using tissues to wipe and blow your nose.
  2. Staying home from school when you are sick.
  3. Keep hands out of mouth.
  4. Do not use other’s forks, spoons, or drink from the same cup. 
  5. Teach kids to wash their hands.

 

How do you teach a child to wash their hands?

Have kids do the following steps to wash their hands…

  1. Wet their hands with warm or cold water.
  2. Use soap to lather their hands while singing “Happy Birthday” twice.
  3. Scrub between fingers, on the backs of hands, and under nails.
  4. Rinse well and dry with a clean towel.

 Tip: Create a colorful chart with the steps above and display in all bathrooms.

Here’s a Great Book that Teaches Kids about Germs

Have you ever asked a child to wash their hands and they asked “Why?” The story, Do not lick this book* by Idan Ben-Barak and Julian Frost, provides a fun and engaging way to answer this question.

How this Book makes Learning about Germs Fun!

This book is about an oval shaped microbe character named Min, who teaches children about germs, by going on an adventure. Min begins her journey ON the book and involves readers by asking them to take her various places.

For example, the book says “Let’s take Min on an adventure! See the circle on the next page? That’s where Min lives. Touch the circle with your finger to pick her up. Min is now on your finger!”

Taking your Child on a Germ Journey

During Min’s travels, she meets friends and takes them along the way. Somehow Min and Rae end up on the reader’s shirt! At each stop, the authors show children a microscopic view of their destination. Additionally, commentary from other microbes explain how they function. While Min and Rae on are the reader’s shirt, one microbe says “Can you give me a hand spreading this dirt around?” Another microbe says “We’re making this shirt smell.”

While Min and friends are on the reader’s belly button, one microbe asks, “Did I tell you about the time soap got all the way in here? Another microbe replies “I don’t like scary stories!” This book teaches children the importance of brushing their teeth, washing clothes, and taking a bath in a humorous manner.

At the end, the authors show readers what microbes really look like and where they can be found.

Let’s apply it with 4 FUN Activities!

 Use the activities below to….

  1. Teach your Child about germs.
  2. Encourage them to help with chores.
  3. Promote Hygiene and Self-Care.

 

I do these activities with my son and he loves it!

Create the Germ/Microbe

  1. Have your child draw a germ/microbe.
  2. Tell the child to give the microbe a name.
  3. Have your child draw the microbe a friend and name it.
  4. Tell your child the microbe is going to travel to three places…
    • Their clothes
    • On their teeth
    • On their hands
  5. Tell your child you are going to get rid of the germs by doing the next three activities.

Laundry

  1. Explain to children that microbes get on our clothes and make them dirty and stinky.
  2. While doing laundry have your child help you put the clothes in the dryer and washing machine.
  3. While your child is handling the clothes say the following…
    • “Let’s get the Microbes off the clothes by putting them in washing machine.
  4. Make it fun and urgent by saying the following…
    • “Oh no! The microbes are multiplying let’s put them in the washing machine quickly!
    • Make it into a race against the Microbes.

Brushing Teeth

  1. Explain to children that microbes get on our teeth and cause tooth decay and cavities.
  2. Explain that cavities are holes in your teeth.
  3. The microbes also cause your breathe to stink.
  4. These microbes love sugars like candy.
  5. In order to get them off, they must floss and brush their teeth.
  6. While your child is brushing their teeth say the following..
    • “Hurry Hurry, the microbes are running because they know we are about to brush your teeth!
    • Let’s brush your teeth to remove them now!”
    • I hear the microbes saying, “No, No don’t brush your teeth! We don’t like the smell of toothpaste!”
  7. When your child is rinsing their mouth and spitting, say the following…
    • “The microbes are down the drain and they are yelling “No, No!”

Washing Hands

  1. Explain to children that microbes get on our hands as we touch various things like the doorknob and sink.
  2. We often touch our noses, mouths, and eyes allowing microbes to come into our bodies and make us sick.
  3. We need to wash our hands to decrease our chances of getting sick.
  4. While your child is washing their hands, laugh and say the following…
    • “We are going to get those microbes by washing our hands with soap!”
    • “The microbes are scared of soap so let’s keep scrubbing!”
  5. When your child is rinsing their hands, say the following…
    • “The microbes are down the drain and they are yelling “No, No!”
    • “Yes! We conquered the microbes!”

When I forget to do these activities, my son usually asks me to play the Microbe Games!

Get creative with your children on how to remove microbes!

Bonus Tip: 

Here are Fun Chore Charts for Kids of All Ages

Happy Cleaning!

Don’t forget to check our two books, Teach your Toddler to Read Through Play and Fun and Easy Ways to Teach your Toddler to Write.

 

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How Dads Can Help Children Become Better Readers

How Dads Can Help Children Become Better Readers

The Benefit of Dads Reading Aloud to Their Kids

I remember going to the local library and listening to an Education Expert lecture about the importance of reading aloud to your children. This expert said children whose dads read to them are more likely to become avid readers in adulthood.  One of the reasons is men’s lower voices tend to command more attention and sometimes can be better heard from children due to the lower frequency of the sound wave. For example, people with slight hearing loss find it easier to hear men’s voices than women and children’s voices.  Also, a Harvard University study found that dads reading bedtime stories is better for children’s language development.

How Can Dads Help a Child Become a Better Reader?

Dads should read aloud to their child frequently. Also, children can observe how their dad enunciates words and his reading rhythm. Furthermore,  do hands-on activities where the child can experience the words in the book. For example, if the child is reading about animals on Wednesday, take the book with you to the zoo on Saturday. Show the child the animals in the book while observing them at the zoo. This allows the child to see the words and experience it simultaneously.

Below is a video of Read Aloud Strategies to Make Books Fun For Kids!

How do Books Help Children’s Development?

Children will learn life skills through experience. However, books can help a child’s development because they see how book characters solve problems and handle difficult situations. This is why it’s important for dads to read various types of books frequently to their children. The child receives a male’s perspective on how to handle issues through discussion encouraged from reading books. Also dads are given the opportunity to discuss a variety of topics through books which can range from friendship to feelings and emotion.

A Fun Book Dads Can Read to Children

*This post contains affiliate links, which means I receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you, if you make a purchase using the links.

These reasons, along with others, is why I like to find books where a dad is one of the main characters. I found a book, Be Glad Your Dad Is Not an Octopus! by Matthew Logelin, Sara Jensen, and Jared Chapman, that is entertaining and educational.

Why We Like This Book

Along with the benefit of dads reading aloud, this book highlights the positive aspects of fathers such as telling funny stories or singing silly songs. It also stresses the negative side of dads, from a kid’s perspective, like being bossy or grouchy. Sometimes kids wish their dad’s were someone else, but the author warns children to be careful what they wish for because it be could way worse.

The book gives humorous scenarios of how it could be worse. One page reads, “Be glad your dad is not a tortoise because everything would take forever.” Another example is “Be glad your dad is not a Dung Beetle, because he would pile poop in your room, (Seriously, that would be really gross.)”

Fun Educational Components of the Book

The animals discussed in this book provide children with insight on how they function. At the end, the author gives more information about each animal in the book. When dung beetles pile poop and eat it, they help rid the earth of it. If they didn’t, the whole world would be covered in it!

My husband and son had a great time reading this book! My son found this funny and entertaining!!!

Fun Ideas to Supplement Book

Take it a step further and do a fun activity to supplement this book. Below are some ideas…

  1. Role play a tortoise and do everything around the house slowly.
  2. Get a balled up brown sock, representing poop, and leave it beside your child’s bed.
    • Leave a note saying “Daddy the Dung Beetle left this poop for you!”

Get this book and let your child laugh and learn while dad reads.

P.S. If dad is not present, get other family members and friends, like granddads, uncles, and mentors, to read to your child.

Happy Reading!

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Holiday Laugh-Out-Loud Jokes for Kids

HolidayLaughOut LoudJokesForKids

Wouldn’t it be great for your family to have access to Laugh-Out-Loud Jokes for Kids this holiday?

This time of the year promotes relaxation, reminiscing, and laughter with family. Below, I have provided you with jokes to share with your loved ones after you all have opened your presents!

Children and adults will have a great time guessing the answers.

These jokes came from the book The Complete Laugh-Out-Laugh Holiday Jokes for Kids by Rob Elliott. This book is filled with jokes for Halloween, Thanksgiving, and Christmas. If you want more jokes,  get his book!

Let’s get started!

Also, download our FREE Printable Holiday Card so your children can showcase their artwork to family and friends this Holiday Season!

  1. What do snowmen eat for Lunch?

    • Brrrr-itos
  2. What is a Christmas tree’s least favorite month of the year?

    • Sep-timber
  3. What did Frosty wear to the wedding?

    • His snowsuit
  4. Why was Santa dressed up?

    • He was going to the snowball
  5. Why do snowmen always change their minds?

    • Because they are flaky!
  6. What does Santa give Rudoph when he has bad breath?

    • Orna-mints
  7. Who bring Christmas presents to a shark?

    • Santa Jaws
  8. What did the gingerbread man do when he sprained his ankle?

    • He iced it.
  9. What do grumpy sheep say during the holidays?

    • “Baa, baa, humbug.”
  10. Why do elves go to school?

    • To learn the elf-abet
  11. Why did the math teacher get sick after Christmas dinner?

    • He had too much pi.
  12. What does an elf listen to on the radio?

    • wrap music
  13. How do snow spend their Christmas vacations?

    • Chilling out
  14. What does Santa give his reindeer for a stomach ache?

    • Elk-a-Seltzer
  15. Why didn’t the rope get any presents?

    • Because it was knotty
  16. What did Mrs. Claus say to Rudolph when he was grump?

    • “You need to lighten up!”
  17. What is something you can throw during the holidays but catch?

    • A Christmas Party
  18. Why was the cat afraid to climb the Christmas tree?

    • It was scared of the bark.
  19. Why did the baker give everybody free cookies for  Christmas?

    • Because he had a lot of dough!
  20. What is a skunk’s favorite Christmas song?

    • “Jungle Smells”

 

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5 Reading Games/Activities For Kids

Infants Can Read?          baby smiling

Did you know that children show signs of reading as infants? Reading is all about discovering meaning and this is what your baby did  when they first responded to your smile.

Sometimes discovering meaning can be lost with traditional ISOLATED learning methods such letter sounds and worksheets. Reading should follow the natural way that children learn which is through a variety of experiences and following their interests.

Following Your Child’s Interest

If children are offered reading material that follow their interests, then they will want to seek meaning from words. From this desire, they will learn word recognition and phonics skills.

Children learn best from discoveries they make from exploring the world around them. They gather conclusions from their experimentations and creative play. For example, in water play, they learn about volume, capacity, and the properties of water as they pour it cup to cup.

What You Can Do As a Parent

Your job as the parent is to describe their play and provide them with language.  During water play, use descriptive words such as wet, splash, ripples, warm, and cool.  Then expose them to similar words by reading books dealing with water such Splish, Splash Ducky by Lucy Cousins or Spot Goes to the Swimming Pool by Eric Hill.  This is the beginnings of  you making connections with language and play.

The games/activities provided below will  help you make more connections with words through creative play.

Want to know what Games/Activities, Tips, and Resources were used to get my 3-year-old son to read on a 3rd grade level? Access my e-book, Teach Your Toddler to Read through Play, here. 

Let’s Get Started!

Change the Story

Children should be provided opportunities to apply knowledge from books through imaginative play. Below is a way to stimulate your child’s ability to problem solve, sort information, and develop new ideas through creative-thinking questions. Below is how to do it…

  1. Read a story to your child.
  2. Ensure your child is familiar with the story.
    • You may have to read the story multiple times to your child.
  3. Have your child change the ending.
  4. They may communicate their version of the ending through the following…
    • Drawing a picture
    • Creating a sculpture with Playdoh or Clay
    • Creating a dance
    • Role playing with props
    • Simply telling the story

play doh

Clues from the Story

The following activity will develop your child’s listening skills. It is also great for reading comprehension and learning new vocabulary.

  1. Read a story to your child.
  2. Ensure your child is familiar with the story.
    • You may have to read the story multiple times to your child.
  3. Gather clues from the story you have read. Clues from the story can include…
    • Characters
    • Setting – where the story took place.
    • The conflict or problem in the story.
    • The story’s resolution
    • Basically anything in the story
  4. Let your child guess what you are thinking from the story with the clues you give them.
  5. Use descriptive words to describe your clue such as…
    • “I’m thinking of a humongous animal with a large trunk.”
    • Then let your child give you the answer which is elephant.
  6. Now let your child think of something and give you clues.
  7. Another variation of this game is to have your child get clues by asking you yes/no questions about a mystery item.
    • “Is it large?
    • “Does it make a loud noise”

Treasure Hunt   treasure hunt

This game is great for reading comprehension. It also helps your child learn how print and pictures carry meaning.

  1. Read a story to your child.
  2. Ensure your child is familiar with the story.
    • You may have to read the story multiple times to your child.
  3. Tell your child they are going to do a treasure hunt.
  4. Find one vocabulary word, item, or character from the story.
  5. If you have the item in your home, you may use it for the hunt.
  6. If you don’t have the item, you may draw a picture and briefly describe it on separate piece of paper.
  7. Hide the item in your home.
  8. Leave a series of notes or pictures to help your child find the item.
    • For example, write “Go to the dining room table” or draw a picture of the  dining room table.
    • On the dining room table, have another note ready stating, “Go to your bedroom” or draw the child’s bedroom.
  9. Your child will continue finding and following instructions on notes or drawings until he/she locates the item from the story.
  10. Once your child has found the item, ask them to identify the item and how it fits in the story.

Charades

You will need more than one child for this game. This game is great for reading comprehension and promotes in-depth learning. In-depth learning is when you learn about something in various ways. Charades will allow your child to learn words through physical activities, reading, and application (identifying where it fits in the story)

  1. Read a story to your child.
  2. Ensure your child is familiar with the story.
    • You may have to read it multiple times to your child.
  3. Write vocabulary words or characters from the story on index cards or paper.
  4. Players will take turns picking these cards from a plastic bag and acting them out.
  5. The other players will guess the word.
  6. Once the word is identified, then have the child identify where the word fits in the story.
  7. Another variation of this game is to have the player draw a picture of the word while the other players guess the word.

Spy a Word

  1. Read a story to your child.
  2. Ensure your child is familiar with the story.
    • You may have to read it multiple times to your child.
  3. Omit a word and let your child fill in the blanks.
  4. Let’s say you read a story where a mouse is trying to find cheese.
  5. You say “In the story, the mouse is trying to find……
  6. Let your child say “cheese.”
  7. Keep stating the plot of the story and let your child fill in the blanks.
  8. Another variation of this game is to fill in the blanks with silly words and let your child correct you.
  9. You state  “In the story, the mouse is trying to find a cat to eat him.
  10. Let your child correct you with the word “cheese.”

black father reading to son

Have Fun Reading and Playing!

Don’t forget to check our two books, Teach your Toddler to Read Through Play and Fun and Easy Ways to Teach your Toddler to Write.

Don’t forget to sign up for our FREE course on How to Teach the Alphabet in a Fun Way!

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170 Children’s Books with Black Characters

170 children's books with black characters

I love reading good children’s books with my three-year-son and recommending them to my friends who are mothers. When I recently sent them a book recommendation, one mom requested books with black characters.

This mom and I have black children and it is important for us to have books with characters that resemble them. It helps our children make a connection with the characters, plot, and setting.

Suddenly I started creating a list of books we have read with black characters. At first, I thought the list would consist of 25 books. However, as I began writing, it went from 25, 50, 75, 100, 125, 150, and then finally to 170 books!

Some of these books I have read to my son, and then some he read independently.

Below is a video of Reading Games/Activities for Kids

Read these books below and make them come alive to your children.

Let’s get started! 

*This post contains affiliate links, which means I receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you, if you make a purchase using the links.

1. Max Goes to the Barber by Adria F. Klein/Mernie Gallagher-Cole

  • This book explores a boy’s visit to the barber as he gets his hair cut and combed.

2. Max Goes to the Dentist by Adria F. Klein/Mernie Gallagher-Cole

  •  This book describes what a trip to the dentist entails. As a result, Max learns how to take proper care of this teeth.

3. Max Goes to School by Adria F. Klein/Mernie Gallagher-Cole

  • Learn about Max’s day at school, as he listens to a story, draws a picture, plays on the playground, and eats lunch.

4. Max Goes to the Library by Adria F. Klein/ Mernie Gallagher-Cole

  • Max, who loves to read, discovers all the services available to him during a visit to the library.

5. Max Goes to the Zoo by Adria Klein/Mernie Gallagher-Cole

  • Max and his friend, Lily, spend a day exploring the zoo. Read this book and find out what animals they see.

6. Lola at the Library by Anna McQuinn/Rosaline Beardshaw

  • Lola and her mom go to the library weekly. Find out what fun she has and the friends she meets.

7. The Snowy Day by Erza Jack Keats

  • This work reveals the adventures of a little boy in the city on a very snowy day.

8. Peter’s Chair by Erza Jack Keats

  • Learn how Peter’s world is turned upside down with the arrival of a new baby sister.

9. Goggles by Erza Jack Keats

  • Peter and his friend find motorcycle goggles. Find out what happens when the older boys from the neighborhood want the goggles.

10. Pet Show by Erza Jack Keats

  • Archie faces a dilemma  when he wants to enter a pet show but his cat runs away. Read how he uses fast thinking to solve his problem.

11. Whistle for Willie by Erza Jack Keats

  • Learn about Peter, on a hot summer day, who wants to whistle for his dog, Willie.

12. Ten, Nine, Eight by Molly Bang

  • This book is about bedtime fun and a countdown to pleasant dreams.

13. Whose Toes are Those by Jabari Asim/LeUyen Pham

  • Kids will enjoy this interactive book that celebrates the game, This Little Piggy.

14. I Am So Brave by Stephen Krensky/Sara Gillingham

  • Discover how this boy grows out of toddlerhood with courage and success!

15. I Know A lot by Stephen Krensky/Sara Gillingham

  • Discover how this girl grows out of toddlerhood with new knowledge to share!

16. Shades of Black: A Celebration of our Children by Sandra L. Pinkney/Miles Pinkney

  • This book explores the various skin tones, hair texture, and eye color of black children.

17. Shanna’s Teacher Show by Jean Marzollo/Shane W. Evans

  • Today Shanna is playing a teacher who knows how to make learning fun! She also teaches kids creativity and how to problem solve.

18. God Bless the Child by Billie Holiday/Arthur Herzog, Jr.

  • This book is based off the song by Billie Holiday, “God Bless the Child.”

19. Harper Counts Her Blessings by Kristi Guillory Reid/Jerry Craft

  • This book shows children the importance of taking the time each day as a family to reflect upon their blessings and to thank God.

20. Peek a Boo Morning by Rachel Isadora

  • A toddler plays a game of peekaboo with her family.

My son reading a book.

21. Peek a Boo Bedtime by Rachel Isadora

  • A fun-loving toddler delights in entertaining his family, friends, and puppy with his special game throughout the day.

22. Green Pants by Kenneth Kraegel

  • Jameson only wears green pants. When he wears green pants, he can do anything. If he wants to be in his cousin’s wedding, he is required to wear a tuxedo, with black pants. What will he do?

23. Brown Boy Brown Boy What Can you Be by Ameshia Arthur

  • Read about Matthew as he considers all the things he can accomplish and the careers he can do.

24. Dad Who Will I Be? by G. Todd Taylor/Jorge Hernandez

  • This book inspires, encourages, and educates young readers to be great by introducing them to heroes of color from a number of different professions.

25. Full Full Full of Love by Trish Cooke/Paul Howard

  • For the youngest member of an extended family, Sunday dinner
    at Grannie’s can be full of hugs and kisses, tasty dishes, happy faces, and love. This book has a special focus on the bond between little Jay Jay and his grannie.

26. I Look Up to Michelle Obama by Anna Membrino/Fatti Burke

  • This board book reveals Michelle Obama’s excellent qualities with text designed to share and read aloud.

27. Mary had a Little Glam by Tammi Sauer/Vanessa Brantley-Newton

  • This little Mary has swag! In this fun take on Mother Goose, fashionable Mary helps childhood’s characters go glam.

28. Dream Big, Little One by Vashi Harrison

  • This book showcases black women who changed the world.

29. Marvelous Me: Inside and Out by Lisa Bullard/Brandon Reibeling

  • There is no one else quite like Alex as he is one of a kind. This book will encourage children to embrace the things that make them unique.

30. Baby Dance by Ann Taylor/Majorie van Heerden

  • For the babies who respond to music and movement, this work provides a playful poem that has a father and child dancing.

31. Milo’s Museum by Zetta Elliott/Purple Wong

  • Milo is excited about her class trip to the museum.  However, Milo realizes that the people from her community are missing from the museum. Milo takes matters into her own hands and opens her own museum!

32. Please, Baby, Please by Spike Lee/Tonya Lewis Lee

  • This book explores the thrills of bringing up a baby! Families everywhere will want to share in these precious moments again and again.

33. Leo Loves Baby Time by Anna McQuinn/Ruth Hearson

  • On Wednesdays, Leo and his mom go to Baby Time, where he plays peek-a-boo, sings, and meets new friends.

34. Leo Can Swim by Anna McQuinn/Ruth Hearson

  • Leo and Daddy go to swim class where they kick, bounce, and dive like little fish.

35. Pretty Brown Face by Andrea Davis Pinkney/Brian Pinkney

  •  Join the fun as a baby boy discovers the unique features on his face. This board book also celebrates the loving closeness of an African American family.

36. I Love My Hair by Natasha Anatasia Tarpley/E.B. Lewis

  • Keyana discovers the beauty and magic of her special hair, encouraging black children to be proud of their heritage and to enhance their self-confidence.

37. Afro-Bets 1,2,3 by Cheryl Willis Hudson

  • Children will enjoy learning numbers 1 through 10 as the Afro-Bets take turns stretching and bending into numbers.

38. Afro-Bets ABC Book by Cheryl Willis Hudson

  • The Afro-Bets ABC book uniquely presents letters A through Z for young children to discover with the fun-filled, captivating Afro-Bets Kids.

39. Afro-Bets Book of Colors by Margery Brown/Culverson Blair

  • Learn the colors in a fun way with the Afro-Bets Kids.

40. Afro-Bets Book of Shapes by Margery Brown/Culverson Blair

  • Learn the shapes in a fun way with the Afro-Bets Kids.

41. Riley Can be Anything by Mrs. Davina Hamilton/Elena Reinoso

  • This inspiring rhyming story follows Riley as he discovers some of the wonderful things he can do when he grows up.

42. Chocolate Me by Taye Diggs/Shane W. Evans

  • The boy in this book is teased for looking different than the other kids. He tells his mother he wishes he could be more like everyone else. She helps him to see how beautiful he is.

43. Mixed Me by Taye Diggs/Shane W. Evans

  • This story is about a boy named Mike who has to answer many questions about being mixed. Learn about the day in the life of a mixed-race child with this book.

44. I Am Mixed by Garcelle Beauvais/Sebastian A. Jones

  • This book follows twins, Jay and Nia, who explore what it is like to be of mixed ancestry, proving that a child is more than the sum of their parents.

45. I Love you More Than by Taye Diggs/Shane W. Evans

  • This story is perfect for families who are separated, whatever the circumstances. Its message of love highlights the bond between parent and child in ways that little ones will understand.

46. Lullaby (For a Black Mother) by Langston Hughes/Sean Qualls

  • The poet, Langston Hughes, celebrates the love between an African American mother and her baby.

47. Ada Twist Scientist by Andrea Beaty/David Roberts

  • Ada learns the value of thinking her way through problems and continuing to stay curious.

48. When God Made You by Matthew Paul Turner/David Catrow

  • This book inspires young readers to learn about their own special gifts and how they fit into God’s divine plan.

49. Monster Trouble by Lane Fredrickson/Michael Robertson

  • Nothing frightens Winifred Schnitzel, but she needs her sleep. The neighborhood monsters WON’T let her be! What’s a girl to do? (Hint: Monsters HATE kisses!)

50. Even Superheroes Have Bad Days by Shelly Becker/Eda Kaban

  • This energetic picture book has plenty of fun ideas to help kids cope when they’re feeling overwhelmed.

51. Hank’s Big Day by Evan Kuhlman/Chuck Groenink

  • Hank is a pill bug with a busy life.  His daily routine involves nibbling a dead leaf, climbing up a long stick, avoiding a skateboarder, and playing pretend with his best friend, a human girl named Amelia.

52. Not Norman: A Goldfish Story by Kelly Bennett/Noah Z. Jones

  • Norman the goldfish isn’t what this little boy had in mind. He wanted a different kind of pet. When he tries to trade Norman for a “good pet,” things don’t go as he planned.

53. Max and the Tag-Along Moon by Floyd Cooper

  • Grandpa promises Max that the moon at his house is the same moon that will follow him all the way home. When the sky darkens and the moon disappears behind the clouds, he worries that it didn’t follow him home after all.

54. These Hands by Margaret Mason/Floyd Cooper

  • Joseph learns that people joined their hands to fight discrimination so that one day, their hands could do anything in this world.

55. Can I Touch Your Hair?: Poems of Race, Mistakes, and Friendship by Irene Latham/Charles Waters

  • Two poets, one white and one black, explore race and childhood in this  collection tailored to provoke thought and conversation.

56. I Am Loved by Nikki Giovanni/Ashley Bryan

  • Nikki Giovanni’s collection of poems celebrates the importance of a child feeling loved.

57. The Word Collector by Peter Reynolds

  • Jerome discovers the magic and power of words all around him.

58. Max Speed by Stephen Shaskan

  • Max, a tiny speed racer, is off on the adventure of a lifetime in this  picture book. It proves that all you need for a big adventure is a little imagination.

59. Goodnight Lab: a Scientific Parody by Chris Ferrie

  • This book pokes fun at the clutter and chaos of a science lab life. Kids can laugh and learn at the same time.

60 . Mae Among the Stars by Roda Ahmed/Stasia Burrington

  • This book is about Little Mae’s curiosity, intelligence, and determination, matched with her parents’ encouraging words. This paved the way for her incredible success at NASA as the first African American woman to travel in space.

61. Hidden Figures: The True Story of Four Black Women and the Space Race by Margot Lee Shetterly/Laura Freeman

  • This book is based on the New York Times bestselling book and the Academy Award–nominated movie. Author Margot Lee Shetterly and illustrator Laura Freeman bring to you the inspiring true story of four black women who helped NASA launch men into space.

62. Have You Thanked an Inventor Today? by Patricia McLaurin & Dian Wang

  • This is a book of African-American inventor contributions to the American landscape. This book was written to appeal to African-American youth, inspiring creative thought and innovation.

63. I Want to Be a Police Officer by Laura Driscoll/Cantalina Echeverri

  • This story teaches readers about police officers who protect people, investigate crimes, and even work with trained dogs.

64. I Want to be a Doctor by Laura Driscoll/Echeverri

  • This story teaches readers about Doctors, who help sick people feel better. When little brother Jack hurts his foot, the family gets to meet all kinds of doctors.

65. The Penny Pot by Stuart Murphy/Lynn Cravath

  • This book shows kids how to count and use money. It also addresses the concept of saving to get what you want.

66. Elevator Magic by Stuart Murphy/G. Brian Karas

  • This book teaches kids subtraction. Ben sees crazy things every time the door opens to the elevator. Ride along as he subtracts his way down to the lobby, and decide for yourself if it’s elevator magic.

67. Early Sunday Morning by Denene Millner/Vanessa Brantley-Newton

  •  June is a girl who collects helpful pieces of advice on how to be less nervous about her big solo.

68. A Wild Cowboy by Dana Kessimakis Smith/Laura Freeman

  • When a little boy gets to spend the day at Grandma’s house, he’s really preparing to go on the cowboy ride of his dreams. With his imagination working, he and his partner ride their horses  to meet their ranch hand.

69. Beautiful Blackbird by Ashley Bryan

  • Blackbird was voted the most beautiful bird in the forest. The other birds, who were colored red, yellow, blue, and green, begged Blackbird to paint their feathers with a touch of black so they could be beautiful too. Black-bird warns them that true beauty comes from within, however the other birds persist.

70. Take a Picture of Me, James Van Der Zee by Andrea Loney/Keith Mallett

  • This is a story of James  who opened his own portrait studio in Harlem. He took photographs of legendary figures of the Harlem Renaissance–politicians such as Marcus Garvey, performers including Florence Mills, Bill -Bojangles- Robinson, and Mamie Smith–and ordinary folks in the neighborhood too.

71. Who is Barack Obama? by Roberta Edwards/Who HQ

  • This is a biography about Barack Obama who made history as our first African-American President. Children will learn his life story and become big dreamers.

72. The Seven Days of Kwanzaa by Ella Grier/John William Ward

  • This is a story that celebrates and honors the richness of African-American culture and traditions. It includes lyrics to songs and four simple recipes to make a holiday feast.

73. Hey Black Child by Useni Eugene Perkins/Bryan Collier

  • This work consists of empowering poems that celebrate black children and  inspires young people to dream big and achieve their goals.

74. Pretend You’re a Cat by Jean Marzollo/Jerry Pinkney

  • This interactive book consists of rhyming verses asking the reader to purr like a cat, scratch like a dog, leap like a squirrel, and bark like a seal.

75. Angels Watching Over Me by Julia Durango/Elisa Kleven

  • This book reassures young children that someone is watching over their well-being.

76. Crown: An Ode to the Fresh Cut by Derrick Barnes/Gordon C. James

  • The reader will understand the feelings of a young African American boy as he gets a “fresh cut. ”  This trip to the barbershop changes the way he feels about the world and in turn how the world perceives him. This book is for older or mature children.

77. Little Red and the Very Hungry Lion by Alex T. Smith

  • Little Red is on her way to visit Auntie Rosie with a basket of goodies and  medicine. Along the way she meets the Very Hungry Lion, who wants to gobble her up. The Lion’s plan doesn’t work out the way he wanted.

78. Penny and the Magic Puff Balls by Alonda Williams/Tyrus Goshay

  • Penny wanted to wear her hair “down” like all of the other girls in her class. She wondered why her friends had long straight hair and she did not.  Penny’s mom assured her that her hair is perfect. Penny learns through a series of fun adventures, that wonderful and magical things happen when she wears her puffballs.

79. I’m A Pretty Little Black Girl by Betty Bynum

  • Mia finds that pretty is within herself and her friends, and being pretty is way beyond what the mirror shows.

80. I Am Enough by Grace Byers/Kenturah A. Bobo

  • This book encourages girls to love who they are, respect others, and be kind to one another.

81. This Little Light of Mine by Public Domain/E.B. Lewis

  • “This Little Light of Mine” is an African-American spiritual song dating back to the days of slavery. The song is included in this book so that you can learn to play and sing.

82. World of Reading: Black Panther: This is Black Panther (Level 1) by Alexandra C. West/Marvel Press Artist

  • Kids will learn how T’Challa, an African Prince, protects his nation and becomes the Super Hero Black Panther.

83. Marvel’s Black Panther: Meet Black Panther (Level 2) by R.R. Busse

  • T’Challa, the Black Panther and warrior King of Wakanda, teams up with elite members of the Dora Milaje–Wakanda’s special forces–and C.I.A. agent Everett K. Ross to defend his kingdom.

84. Black Panther Little Golden Book by Frank Berrios/Patrick Spaziante

  • Children, ages 2-5, will love this action-packed Little Golden Book as they learn about the Black Panther–from his Wakandan origins to his powers as well as his friends and enemies.

85. Caribbean Dream by Rachel Isadora

  •  Children will learn about a place where they can run, splash, and sing, on an island in the West Indies. Rachel Isadora’s book celebrates the things that make the Caribbean a very special home.

86. Marvelous Cornelius: Hurricane Katrina and the Spirit of New Orleans by Phil Bildner/John Parra

  • This is an inspiring story of a humble man and the heroic difference he made in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

87. Jabari Jumps by Gaia Cornwall

  • Jabari is definitely ready to jump off the diving board. He has finished his swimming lessons and passed his swim test. He’s a great jumper, so he’s not scared at all. Find out why he still needs his father for encouragement.

88. Happy in Our Skin by Fran Manushkin/Lauren Tobia

  • This is a story about the human family and how wonderful it is to be just who you are.

89. Lottie Paris and the Best Place by Angela Johnson/Scott Fischer

  • Lottie Paris has a favorite place. The library! She loves to go there and read about space. She knows there are rules at the library, but sometimes they are difficult to follow.

90. Lottie Paris Lives Here by Angela Johnson/Scott Fischer

  • Lottie Paris loves to dress up, play on the slide, and prefers to eat cookies instead of vegetables. She has a great imagination and sees the possibilities in the simplest pleasures.

91. Seeing Into Tomorrow Haiku by Nina Crews/Dr. Richard Wright

  • A selection of haiku poems by the acclaimed 20th-century African-American writer, Dr. Richard Wright. This work reflects the timeless realities of African-American youth.

92. I Can be Anything!  Don’t Tell Me I Can’t by Diane Dillon

  • Zoe embraces all the wonders of our world and its possibilities. “I can be anything I want to be!” she tells us, presenting herself in a range of careers. “But what if you fail?” asks a voice of doubt that attempts to undermine her confidence.

93. Billy Boo is Stuck in Goo by Jennifer Hamburg/Ross Burach

  • Billy Boo is stuck in goo. When others try to rescue him, they get stuck as well. How will they get out of this situation?

94. My Name is Judah by Pamela Denise Mack

  • This is a story about a little boy named Judah, who meets three new friends. He shares the meaning of his name which is Praise. Judah and his new friends, Suzie, Jorge, and Tom share a fun-filled day together.

95. It’s Great Being a Dad by Dan Bar-el/Gina Perry

  • Mythical characters are roaming around a magical land having a great time. However, Bigfoot gets his foot stuck in a tree trunk and Unicorn gets her horn impaled on a table and Robot’s saw-arm gets rusted into position.  Dad is there to fix things–even when a Sneaky Flying Alligator Pirate steals the Fairy Queen Ballerina Doctor’s wand.

96. The Doctor with an Eye for Eyes: The Story of Dr. Patricia Bath by Julia Finley Mosca/Daniel Rieley

  • Patricia Bath made it her mission to become a doctor. When obstacles like racism, poverty, and sexism threatened this goal, she persevered and created a game-changing treatment for blindness!

97. Do Not Bring Your Dragon to the Library by Julie Gassman/Andy Elkerton

  • Have you ever thought about bringing your dragon to the library? Don’t do it! You might have the best intentions, but that dragon will cause nothing but trouble.  This book has diverse characters and discusses library etiquette in a humorous way.

98. Phoebe Sounds it Out by Julie Zwillich/Denise Holmes

  • Meet Phoebe whose name doesn’t look quite like it sounds. At school, her classmates practice writing their names, but she struggles. Her teacher tells her to “just sound it out.” Phoebe doubts herself and procrastinates before resolving to try. Find out what she does to overcome her problem.

99. Not ‘Til Tomorrow, Phoebe by Julie Zwillich/Denise Holmes

  • Phoebe’s day is full of tomorrows: Mama says they can make pancakes, her teacher announces musicians will visit the class, and Phoebe will get ice cream after her haircut—but none of it ’til tomorrow. Phoebe feels frustrated and impatient. Why can’t these good things happen right now?

100. The Colors of Us by Karen Katz

  • Seven-year-old Lena is going to paint a picture of herself. She wants to use brown paint for her skin. When she and her mother take a walk through the neighborhood, Lena learns that brown comes in many different shades.

101. Manners with a Library Book by Amanda Doering Tourville/Chris Lensch

  • Should you let your baby sister play with a library book? This book shows how good manners can help everyone enjoy library books.

102. The Thing Lou Couldn’t Do by Ashley Spires

  • Lou and her friends are BRAVE adventurers. They run faster than airplanes, build mighty fortresses and rescue wild animals. But Lou has never climbed a tree before, and she’s sure she can’t do it. So she tries to convince her friends to play a “not-up-a-tree” game.

103. I like Myself by Karen Beaumont/David Catrow

  • This book encourages kids to appreciate everything about themselves—inside and out. Here’s a little girl who knows what really matters.

104. For You are a Kenyan Child by Kelly Cunnane/Ana Juan

  • Imagine you live in a small Kenyan village, where the sun rises over tall trees filled with doves. You wake to the sound of a rooster’s crow and rather than kicking a soccer ball across a field, you kick a homemade ball of rags. Despite this, things aren’t that different for a Kenyan child than they would be for an American kid.

105. If You Were a Kid Docking at the International Space Station by John Gregory/Jason Raish

  • Tim and Lucy, whose cousin Marie, is getting ready to blast off into space finds out how people travel to and from the space station. They also learn what life is like for astronauts in space, why space exploration is important, and much more.

106. Beautiful Moon: A Child’s Prayer by Tonya Bolden/Eric Velasquez

  • A young boy wakes and has forgotten to say his prayers. Outside his window, a beautiful moon lights the city around him. As the moon slowly makes its way across the heavens, the boy offers a simple prayer for the homeless, the hungry, and others.

107. The Girl With a Mind for Math: The Story of Taye Monatgue by Julia Finley Mosca/Daniel Rieley

  • After touring a German submarine in the early 1940s, young Raye wanted to become an engineer. However, sexism and racial inequality would challenge that dream.  She kept her greatest career accomplishment a secret for decades. Through it all, the gifted mathematician persisted.

108. Little Man Little Man: A Story of Childhood by James Baldwin/Nicholas Boggs

  • James Baldwin’s only children’s book, Little Man, Little Man, celebrates and explores the challenges and joys of black childhood.

109. We Love You Rosie by Cynthia Rylant/Linda Davick

  • Rosie is a very busy little dog. Sometimes she’s good, and sometimes she’s bad. Sometimes she wants to go out, and other times she wants to stay in. But no matter what, Rosie’s family loves her!

110. 3 x 4: Toon Level 1 (Toon Easy-to-read Comics, Level 1) by Ivan Brunetti

  • This book features a black male teacher who gave his class an assignment to draw sets of twelve. He encourages them to use their imagination to come up with creative solutions. Young readers will delight in the counting game while learning the basics of multiplication.

111. Kick it Mo (Mo Jackson) by David Adler/Sam Ricks

  • The soccer season is starting, and Mo has been working hard on his kicking skills. When he gets on the field on game day, it seems like all he gets to do is run back and forth. Will Mo ever get the chance to show his team what he can do?

112. Don’t Throw It To Mo! (Mo Jackson) by David Adler/Sam Ricks

  • Mo is the youngest kid on the Robins, his football team. His classmates don’t mind, but the kids on their rival team tease him for being a “butterfinger” who’s too tiny to catch the ball. How will Mo handle this situation?

113. Pass the Ball, Mo! (Mo Jackson) by David Adler/Sam Ricks

  • Mo loves basketball. He’s determined to learn how to pass, but as the shortest member of the team, he can’t seem to launch the ball high enough. Can Mo learn to pass in time to help his team win the big game?

114. Get a Hit, Mo! by David Adler/Sam Ricks

  • Baseball season has arrived and Mo is all set to play with his team, the Lions. Mo always bats last, and he always plays right field—and no balls ever come to right field. Will Mo ever get his chance to help the Lions win?

115. Young, Gifted and Black: Meet 52 Black Heroes from Past and Present by Jamie Wilson/Andrea Pippins

  • Children will meet 52 icons of color from the past and present in this celebration of inspirational achievement. This is a collection of stories about change makers to encourage, inspire and empower the next generation of youth.

116. Snow Day! by Candice Ransom/Erika Meza

  • Two siblings have woken up to snowy weather! Read along as they engage in their favorite winter activities with their neighborhood friends on their day off from school.

117. I am Human A Book of Empathy by Susan Verde/ Peter H. Reynolds

  • I Am Human shows that it’s okay to make mistakes while also emphasizing the power of good choices. This picture book is a celebration of empathy and encourages children to see themselves as part of one big imperfect family.

118. Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Black Boy by Tony Medina/Javaka Steptoe

  • Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Black Boy offers a fresh perspective of young men of color by depicting thirteen views of everyday life: young boys dressed in their Sunday best, running to catch a bus, and growing up to be teachers, and much more.

119. Kele’s Secret by Tolowa M. Mollel/Catherine Stock

  • A young Tanzanian boy named Yoanes overcomes his fear of the scariest place on his grandparents’ farm, the spooky shed, when he follows Kele, his grandmother’s hen, to see where she lays her eggs.

120. You Can Do It by Tony Dungy/Amy June Bates

  • Tony Dungy’s little brother, Linden, is a third grader who is having a bad day at school. Linden is the youngest of the Dungy family and the least motivated because he hasn’t found “it.” In a family where everyone seems to have found their special talent, all Linden knows is that he wants to make people happy.

121. We are Brothers by Yves Nadon/Jean Claverie

  • Every summer, two brothers swim to the rock, and one jumps off. But this summer, it’s time for both of them to take the leap. In this story, a younger brother discovers newfound strength and courage.

122. Thank You, Omu by Oge Mora

  • Everyone in the neighborhood loves Omu’s delicious stew! They follow their noses toward the scrumptious scent. And one by one, Omu offers a portion of her meal. Soon the pot is empty. Has she been so generous that she has nothing left for herself?

123. Two Problems for Sophia by Jim Averbeck/Yasmeen Ismail

  • Sophia quickly learns her new pet comes with two giraffe-sized problems. Learn what she does to solve these problems.

124. One Word from Sopha by Jim Averbeck/Yasmeen Ismail

  • Sophia tries various techniques to get the giraffe she always wanted. Find out if she is able to convince her Mom, Dad, Uncle, and Grand-mama.

125. Excellent Ed by Stacy McAnulty/Julia Sarcone-Roach

  • Everyone in the Ellis family is excellent–except Ed, the dog. Ed wonders if this is why he isn’t allowed to eat at the table or sit on the couch with the other children. He’s determined to find his own excellence.

126. Brave by Stacy McAnulty/Joanne Lew-Vriethoff

  • This book encourage kids to be brave in all the ways they can. This book will inspire kids to follow their hearts and to have courage, no matter the situation.

127. Goal by Mina Javaherbin/A.G. Goal

  • In a township in South Africa, Ajani and his friends have earned a brand-new, federation-size soccer ball. When a crew of bullies tries to steal their ball, find out if Ajani and his friends are able to beat them at their own game?

128. Me and Uncle Romie by Claire Hartfield/Jerome Lagarrigue

  • James can’t wait to get on board the train and go visit his uncle up north in New York City. He also  wishes he could take a little bit of home along with him. Will Uncle Romie, who’s a great artist, be able to help James?

129. Celebrate with ZaZa by Mylo Freeman

  • It’s Rosie’s birthday and Zaza is having a party for her. It’s time to celebrate!

130. Sleep Well, Siba and Saba by Nansubuga Nagadya Isdahl/Sandra Van Doorn

  •  Sisters, Siba and Saba, are always losing something. Sandals, slippers, sweaters— – you name it, they lose it. When the two sisters fall asleep each night, they dream about the things they have lost that day. Until, one night, their dreams begin to reveal something entirely unexpected….

131. Danitra Brown, Class Clown by Nikki Grimes/E.B. Lewis

  • Best friends, Zuri Jackson and Danitra Brown, respond very differently to the start of school. For Zuri, there are so many things to ponder — a new teacher who replaced the old one she liked so much, passing math, and worrying about her mother’s health. But for Danitra, the only real deal is being true to herself, having fun, and supporting Zuri in any way she can.

132. Meet Danitra Brown by Nikki Grimes/Floyd Cooper

  • This book introduces young readers to Danitra Brown and her best friend, Zuri Jackson.”

133. World of Reading: Doc McStuffins All Stuffed Up: Pre-level 1 by Disney Book Group/Catherina Happy

  • Donny’s teddy bear keeps making him sneeze! Teddy is sad and doesn’t know why Donny won’t play with him anymore, but Doc is on the case!

134. Doc McStuffins Out of the Box (Flap ‘n Tab) by Disney Book Group/Marcy Kelman

  • Little Jack, Doc’s jack-in-the-box, is having trouble popping out of his box. His father, Big Jack, asks Doc to take a look, but Little Jack is too scared to let Doc examine him! Through this format, children can play along with Doc, Little Jack, and the rest of the toys using die-cut tabs and lift-the-flaps for a unique, experience.

135. Doc McStuffins Little First Look and Find – PI Kids by Editors of Phoenix International Publications/

  • Kids can search 7 amazing scenes for Doc McStuffins characters and objects. Then, go to the back of the book for extra Look and Find challenges!

136. Doc McStuffins Pet Vet by Disney Book Group/Disney Storybook Art Team

  • Donny’s new toy dog, Fetchin’ Findo, stops doing what he does best: fetching! Can Doc, the vet, find out what’s wrong with the little pup? This story is based on a special Pet Vet episode and includes lots of fun stickers!

137. The Ring Bearer by Floyd Cooper

  • Jackson’s mother is getting married, and he gets to be the ring bearer. But Jackson is worried . . . What if he trips? Or walks too slowly? She’s supposed to be the flower girl, but Jackson’s not sure she’s taking her job as seriously as she should.

138. Tea Cakes for Tosh by Kelly Starling Lyons/E.B. Lewis

  • Tosh loves listening to Grandma Honey tell family stories.  This story celebrates the important bond between grandchild and grandparent and the stories that make a family strong.

139. Grace for President by Kelly DiPucchio/LeUyen Pham

  • When Grace’s teacher reveals that the United States has never had a female president, she decides to be the first. She immediately starts off her political career as a candidate in the school’s mock election!

140. I’m a Big Brother Now by Katura J. Hudson/Sylvia L. Walker

  •  This picture book explores the  excitement and pride of a young boy who takes on an important new role as a big brother.

141. The Quickest Kid in Clarksville by Pat Zietlow Miller/Frank Morrison

  • It’s the day before the big parade and Alta can only think about one thing: Wilma Rudolph, three-time Olympic gold medalist.  Alta is the quickest kid in Clarksville, Tennessee, just like Wilma once was. But what happens when a new girl with shiny new shoes comes along and challenges Alta to a race?

142. A Beach Tail by Karen P. Williams/Floyd Cooper

  • This is story about a father-son bond. A boy named Gregory is lost on the beach  after his dad warns “Don’t go in the water, and don’t leave Sandy.” This work reassures the young reader that there is hope even in Greg’s moment of worry at finding himself lost and alone.

143. Little Melba and Her Big Trombone by Katheryn Russell-Brown/Frank Morrison

  • At age seven, Melba fell in love with a big, shiny trombone, and soon taught herself to play the instrument. By the time she was a teenager, Melba’s extraordinary gift for music led her to the world of jazz. She joined a band led by trumpet player Gerald Wilson and toured the country. Overcoming obstacles of race and gender, Melba went on to become a famed trombone player and arranger.

144. Last Stop on Market Street by Matt de la Peña/Christian Robinson

  • Every Sunday after church, CJ and his grandma ride the bus across town. But today, CJ wonders why they don’t own a car like his friend Colby. Why doesn’t he have an iPod like the boys on the bus?  Each question is met with an encouraging answer from grandma, who helps him see the beauty in their routine and the world around them.

145. My Kicks: A Sneaker’s Story by Susan Verde/Katie Kath 

  • When a child finds that his toes have outgrown his favorite shoes, and they’ve gotten too dirty and smelly, his mom says it’s time for a new pair. Resistant to let go, the boy reminisces about all the good times he’s had with his favorite kicks on the city streets.

146. Don’t Touch My Hair by Sharee Miller

  • Wherever Aria goes, someone wants to touch her hair. However, Aria has had enough!

147. Radiant Child: The Story of Young Artist Jean Michel Basquiat by Javaka Steptoe

  • This is the story of Jean-Michel Basquiat and his unique, collage-style paintings that became famous in the 1980s.

148. What’s Special About Me, Mama? by Kristina Evans/Javaka Steptoe

  • This a great story about family, self-love and celebrating what makes one unique.

149. Knock, Knock: My Dad’s Dream for Me by Daniel Beaty/Bryan Collier

  • Every morning a boy awaits the sounds of his dad knocking on the door. But what happens when, one day, that “knock knock” doesn’t come? This powerful and inspiring book shows the love that an absent parent can leave behind, and the strength that children find in themselves as they grow up and follow their dreams.

150. When the Beat was Born: DJ Kool Here and the Creation of Hip Hop by Laban Carrick Hill/Theodore Taylor III

  • From his childhood in Jamaica to his youth in the Bronx, Laban Carrick Hill’s book tells how Kool Herc came to be a DJ. He invented music that would define a culture and transform the world.

151. Trombone Shorty by Troy Andrews/Bryan Collier

  • From the Tremé neighborhood in New Orleans, Troy “Trombone Shorty” was a prodigy,  leading his own band by age six. Today this Grammy-nominated artist headlines the legendary New Orleans Jazz Fest.

152. Grandma in Blue with a Red Hat by Scott Menchin/Harry Bliss

  • When a young boy learns about what makes art special, he realizes that these same characteristics are what makes his grandmother special, too. As a result, he finds the inspiration to create his own masterpiece that’s one of a kind.

153. Ron’s Big Mission by Rose Blue/Corinne Nadon

  • Nine-year-old Ron loves going to the library. Today, Ron is ready to take out books by himself, but in the segregated world of South Carolina in the 1950s, there is resistance. Children will learn how Ron desegregated his library through peaceful resistance.

154. Bippity Bop Barbershop by Natasha Anastasia Tarpley/E.B. Lewis

  •  Miles makes his first trip to the barbershop with his father. Like most little boys, he is afraid of the sharp scissors, the buzzing razor, and the prospect of picking a new hairstyle. But with the support of his dad, the barber, and the other men in the barbershop, Miles bravely sits through his first haircut.

155. Squeak, Rumble, Whomp! Whomp! Whomp!: A Sonic Adventure by Wynton Marsalis/Paul Rogers

  • World-renowned jazz musician and composer Wynton Marsalis and acclaimed illustrator Paul Rogers takes readers (and listeners) on a rollicking, clanging, clapping tour through the many sounds that fill a neighborhood.

156. The 5’o Clock Band by Troy Andrews/Bryan Collier

  • After letting his band down by missing rehearsal, Shorty has some serious questions about what it means to be a leader. He hits the streets of New Orleans to find some answers and soak up inspiration.

157. All Are Welcome by Alexandra Penfold/Suzanne Kaufman

  • Follow a group of children through a day in their school, where everyone is welcomed with open arms.  A school where students grow and learn from each other’s traditions

158. Ben Doesn’t Like to be Hugged by Zetta Elliott/Purple Wong

  • A little girl uses rhyming verse to describe the unique traits of her autistic friend. Benny likes trains and cupcakes without sprinkles, but he can also be fussy sometimes. The narrator doesn’t mind, however, because “true friends accept each other just the way they are.”

159. The Day you Begin by Jacqueline Woodson/Rafael Lopez

  • Jacqueline Woodson’s lyrical book reminds us that we all feel like outsiders sometimes-and how brave it is that we go forth anyway. Sometimes, when we reach out and begin to share our stories, others will be happy to meet us halfway.

160. Around Our Way on Neighbor’s Day by Tameka Fryer Brown/Charlotte Riley-Webb

  • Neighbors gather on a hot summer day for a block party: Kids play Double Dutch; men debate at the barber shop and play chess; mothers and aunts cook and friends dance.

161. The Joys of Being a Little Black Boy by Valerie Reynolds/Chris Turner

  • Roy is a boy who will take  your children on a journey of joy with some of the world’s most notable Black men who were all at one time young Black boys.

162. Love your Hair by Dr. Phoenyx Austin

  • This book takes girls on a  journey, lead by a super-cute, confident  girl named Phoenyx, who loves her hair and wants every beautiful brown skin girl to love their hair too!

163. I’m a Pretty Princess by Crystal Swain-Bates

  • Makayla is a pretty black princess who lives in a castle  far away. Although she has cute dresses, a sparkling tiara, and a shiny wand, she knows that being a princess isn’t just about her fancy things. She wants to be the best princess ever!

164. Look What Brown Can Do by T. Marie Harris/Neda Ivanova

  • Every Brown child who’s still dreaming about what to be when they grow up should read this book. It encourages them to dream big and provides inspiration.

165. Naturally Me by Crystal Swain-Bates

  • This book is designed to boost self-esteem and build confidence in children of all ages. It follows a freckle-faced girl and a gap-toothed boy throughout their day as they show the reader how they celebrate their appearance and feel comfortable in their own skin.

166. I am a  Brilliant Little Black Boy by Betty K. Bynum/Joshua B. Drummond

  • The book  is a self esteem builder for young boys of color! It is a book of poems and a must for your library.

167. Amazing Grace by Mary Hoffman

  • Grace loves stories. When she gets a chance to play a role in Peter Pan, she knows exactly who she wants to be. However she meets resistance from those in her class when she does not look the part.

168. Big Hair Don’t Care by Crystal Swain-Bates/Caroline Binch

  • Lola has bigger hair than the other kids at school. She is confident and  sings the praises of her big hair throughout this rhyming picture book.

169. Charlotte and the Quiet Place by Deborah Sosin/Sara Woolley

  • Charlotte likes quiet-time. However, wherever Charlotte goes, she is surrounded by noise. Where can Charlotte find a quiet place? Find out when you read this book.

170. This is the Rope by Jaqueline Woodson/James Ransome

  • This is the story of one family’s journey north during the Great Migration with a little girl in South Carolina who finds a rope under a tree one summer.  For three generations, that rope is passed down, used for everything from jump rope games to tying suitcases onto a car.

Don’t forget to sign up for our FREE course on How to Teach the Alphabet in a Fun Way!

Don’t forget to check our two books, Teach your Toddler to Read Through Play and Fun and Easy Ways to Teach your Toddler to Write.

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17 Children’s Books that Creatively Teach Kids Practical Skills

*This post contains affiliate links, which means I receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you, if you make a purchase using the links.

17 book that teach life skills

I love reading!! I am the person that can spend all day in the library and bookstore soaking up knowledge from various books. When I became a mother, I hoped my son would share the same love of reading as I do.

It turns out that he does. However, I found ways to make books fun and interesting for him.

We often use books and hand-on activities to learn new skills within our household. I wanted to share with you 17 books that promoted fun interaction and  used creativity to teach my son a new concept.

*Click on the links and you will find a book review and  hands-on activities that we have done to supplement the books!

  1. Once Upon an Alphabet: Short Stories For All the Letters by Oliver Jeffers.

 

In this book, each letter has a word and short story related to it. The stories have various themes such as humor, gratefulness, and the art of thinking.  This book also helps children learn how to solve problems through its story telling.

  1. The Question Song by Kaethe Zemach

 

This book teaches kids to solve everyday problems. It addresses issues such as injuries and selfishness. My son found it interesting because it contains repetition, rhythm, and rhyming words.

  1. Emily’s First 100 Days of School by Rosemary Wells

 

This book is about a bunny named Emily who is starting school. Emily tells the reader about her first 100 days of school through short stories. This book  encouraged my son to create other stories with numbers. It helped him learn the numbers 1-100 through imaginative play.

  1. Big Words for Little Geniuses by Susan and James Patterson

 

This book is colorful and introduces kids to big words in alphabetical order. The first word was ARACHIBUTYROPHOBIA!!!! This word means a fear of peanut butter sticking to the top of your mouth. At first, I thought this book would be too advanced for my toddler. However, I decided to give it a try.

It became a great learning and bonding experience for my son and I. He learned how to pronounce all the words in the book. We also try to use the words as we are talking daily.

  1. The Great Dictionary Caper by Judy Sierra.

This is a fun, interactive, and flashy book about parts of speech, literacy, and language arts. This book addresses topics such as actions verbs, homophones, palindromes, onomatopoeias, contractions, etc. The Action verb page has various words like somersault, jump, glide and ricochet. Each word is written and drawn to portray their action.

  1. What’s On Your Plate? Exploring the World of Food by Whitney Stewart

This book highlights countries such as Mexico, Ethiopia, China, and Greece, and gives the reader information on their locations, foods frequently eaten, and recipes. The enticing food pictures in this book will make you hungry. My son gained an interest in learning about geography and connected with this book instantly. He learned that he eats similar foods to people all over the world.

  1. Meet Black Panther by R.R. Busse and This is Black Panther by Alexandra West

 

These two books introduced the characters and their roles for the Black Panther Comic Books. It also addressed themes such as good vs bad, courage, hard work, intelligence, instinct, loyalty, etc. One of the books identified vocabulary words and asked the reader to find them within the story. My son became excited when he saw the words in the story! I took it a step further and introduced my son to settings, geography, action verbs, and science.

  1. Your Fantastic Elastic Brain, Stretch It, Shape It by JoAnn Deak, PhD.

 

This book uses a diverse group of young characters to educate its reader on the powerful brain. A few concepts addressed in this book are parts of the brain and their functions. I was thrilled when we read the fact, “Making mistakes is one of the best ways your brain learns and grows.” Many children get frustrated when they are learning something new because mistakes are made, which is a part of the process. This book has taught me one way to handle my son’s frustration as he experiences the trial and error process.

  1.  I Want to Be a Doctor by Laura Driscoll

 

This story is about a boy who broke his leg by jumping off the top bunkbed. His family takes him to the emergency room, where his inquisitive older sister takes the reader on a journey to learn about the various doctors helping her brother.  Children will learn about specialized professions such as Radiologists, Orthopedists, Neonatologists and Dentists.

  1. Find Your Way in Space By Paul Boston

 

This book will take your young reader on a space mission using math and mapping skills. This book encourages children to solve a mystery. Mathematical concepts addressed in this book are counting, addition, shapes, identifying relationships between objects, colors, length, height, map coordinates, and telling time. The concepts are introduced through questions the reader must answer.

  1. The Berenstain Bears Learn About Strangers by Stan and Jan Berenstain

 

In this book, Brother Bear was cautious and wary of strangers. Sister Bear, similar to my son, was “friendly to a fault” and said hello to everyone. Brother intervened and told his sister to stop talking to strangers, but he couldn’t articulate why. This book explains to the young reader what to do around strangers.

  1. My Weird School Fast Facts – Space, Humans, and Farts by Dan Gutman

 

This book contains a lot of fun, humorous, and engaging information for kids. Your child will discover a love of science from reading this book! If you have a younger child, read these facts to them and see how amazed they become.

  1. When Miles Got Mad by Sam Kurtzman-Counter and Abbie Schiller

 

This is a great book that teaches kids to use their words to express their feelings. It also uses an image, a red monster, to represent anger and rage. The red monster makes a connection to what a child feels when angry feelings overwhelm them. This book addresses other themes such as empathy, self-control, keeping hands to self, and problem solving.

 

  1. How Does My Home Work? By Chris Butterworth

The author brings awareness to actions kids take every day in the home such as flipping on the light switch, accessing water from the faucet, and taking a drink from the refrigerator. He then uses the book to show children how these things happen. This book made my son more curious about how our home functions. He became more conscious of turning off the lights and water before he leaves a room! It also encourages a greater appreciation for your living space.

  1. Treasure Map by Stuart Murphy

 

This book is about a group of friends, the Elm Street Kids’ Club, following a treasure map to find a time capsule. The author shows the reader how to follow a map by giving clues that identify landmarks and directions. Other concepts presented in the book are decision-making skills, interpreting symbols, and scales. The author provides teachers and parents activities to supplement learning. Furthermore, he includes other books that address map reading skills.

16. Milo’s Museum by Zetta Elliott

This book’s plot was unexpected but refreshing. It is about a girl named Milo who takes a class field trip to the museum with her grandfather as a chaperone. As they were exploring the museum, Milo admired the art but something was missing. Children will witness a child taking the initiative to create an idea, plan and execute it. They will learn vocabulary words and will have access to a guide on how to create their own exhibit in the back of the book.

17. 3 x 4 a Toon Book by Ivan Brunetti

This comic book is about a teacher who gives his students a homework assignment of drawing 12 things but in sets.  He is addressing multiplication in the book. The story goes on to show the reader the process that each student executes to complete their homework assignment based on their interests. At the end, you will find tips for parents and teachers on How to Read Comics with Kids.

All of the books listed were fun and interesting to read. They opened my son’s mind  to learning something new and applying what he learned.

Let us know which book was your favorite and what activities you did to supplement the book.

Don’t forget to sign up for our FREE course on How to Teach the Alphabet in a Fun Way!

Also, download our FREE Printable Holiday Card so your children can showcase their artwork to family and friends this Holiday Season!

Don’t forget to check our two books, Teach your Toddler to Read Through Play and Fun and Easy Ways to Teach your Toddler to Write.

Happy Reading!

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4 Simple and Fun Pumpkin Activities for Kids

*This post contains affiliate links, which means I receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you, if you make a purchase using the links.

Pumpkin activities

Every fall, I ask myself what are simple, fun, and educational pumpkin activities to do with my son.  We attend fall festivals in our county and get at least 4 pumpkins annually. This year, I was looking for activities that DID NOT require me to purchase more craft supplies from the store. I wanted to use items that we had on hand.

Below is what we did and had a blast!

Paint The Pumpkin

Materials Needed

 

  1. Put Newspapers or cloth on table for easy clean-up
  2. Put water in cup to clean paint brushes.
  3. Put napkins in paper plate #1 to clean and dry paint brushes.
  4. Put small sections of various color paints on paper plate # 2.
  5. Place pumpkin on table with newspaper/magazine paper or cloth.
  6. Let your child be creative and paint the pumpkin.

 

paint set up
This is our set up before starting to paint.

 

Pick, Count, and Cook Pumpkin Seeds

Materials Needed

 

  1. Place pumpkin on cutting board or pan in front of child.
  2. Give the child a spoon and have them scoop out the seeds.
  3. If they are having difficulty using the spoon, have them use their hands.
  4. Instruct child to put seeds in bowl.
  5. Have the child count the seeds while scooping.
  6. Another option is for the child to count the seeds at the end of the activity.
  7. Roast the pumpkin seeds for a great snack!

 

Scooping pumpkin seeds with spoon!

 

Make Pumpkin Soup with Rice

Materials Needed

  1. Follow our Pumpkin Soup with Rice Recipe.
  2. Have fun eating it with your family!

 

Access Our Pumpkin Soup with Rice Recipe

at the bottom of this post!

 

Have a Science Lesson and Learn about Decomposition

Materials Needed (please note this activity came from Sid the Science Kid Season 1 Episode 6 called Mushy Banana)

  1. Once the painted pumpkin has started to decay put it in a large plastic bag or container.
  2. Let the pumpkin decompose until it changes colors.
  3. Put plastic gloves on the child before touching pumpkin.
  4. Stay close to the child to ensure they don’t put the pumpkin in their mouth.
  5. Have the child feel the pumpkin and compare it to a fresh pumpkin.
  6. Have the child take a closer look by using their magnifying glass.
  7. Ask the child the following questions…
  • How is the pumpkin different from the fresh pumpkin?
  • How does it smell?
  • What colors do you see?
  • How does it feel?
  1. Put Pumpkin in the compost when complete.

 

He is analyzing a decayed pumpkin!

 

We cut the pumpkin in quarters and now he examines the decayed flesh.

Don’t forget to sign up for our FREE course on How to Teach the Alphabet in a Fun Way!

Get the password for the library with Creamy Pumpkin Soup with Rice Recipe by completing this form. Once you press the GET ACCESS NOW button, we will send you an email with the password. Then go to SOY Resource Library and enter the password.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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How to Introduce Multiplication to Kids in a Fun Way

*This post contains affiliate links, which means I receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you, if you make a purchase using the links.

HOW TO INTRODUCE

How to Introduce Multiplication to Kids in a Fun Way

The short story of Why I would Expose my Three-Year Old Son to Multiplication

In order to introduce multiplication to kids, you have to make it fun! My son was playing with numbers in our math set and saw the times tables sign(x). He held up the x and wanted to know what it meant. I challenged myself to explain it in a manner he could understand and I succeeded!!

A Great Children’s Book to Introduce Multiplication to Kids

About three weeks later, I went to the library and saw in the children’s section the title, 3 x 4 a Toon Book by Ivan Brunetti. I thought this comic book would be an excellent tool to further explain how multiplication works to my son.

*Bonus Tip

Go to the bottom of this post to Access 2 Hands-On Art Activities that will Explain Multiplication

The author provides colorful pictures, diverse characters, and a great storyline to introduce multiplication.

A Brief Summary

It is about a teacher who gives his students a homework assignment of drawing 12 things but in sets. A few students raise their hands and ask the teacher about various options to completing their homework. For example, one student asks, “Can I draw 3 sets of 4?”, the teacher replies, “It’s up to you!”

The story goes on to show the reader the process that each student executes to complete their homework assignment. One student likes baseball, so he draws three of each item: baseball, gloves, bats, and hats.

There is one student that needs more time to process her homework assignment. Her mom, dad, and even little brother are there to help her undertake this project. She comes up with a great idea at the end; however, you will have to read the book in order to find out what it is!

Tips for Parents and Teachers

At the end of the book, you will find tips for parents and teachers on How to Read Comics with Kids. The author explains how kids are naturally drawn to the detailed pictures in comics, which makes them want to read the words!

Read this book and provide your child with an entertaining explanation to the importance of multiplication!

What are other ways to teach multiplication tables to children?

One common way is to have children study their times tables a certain amount of time each day. This is how I learned. However, there are creative ways through play that children can learn as well.

  1. Build a number city of multiples with Legos.
    • My son saw a YOUTUBE video about counting by 3s. We built the following numbers with legos: 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, and 24,
    • We created a role play where his toy elephant’s mission was to destroy the city.
    • Every time elephant knocked down and destroyed a number, my son had to build the number up.
    • This role play provided familiarity with multiples of three.
    • Plus, my son was the city’s hero because he kept building the numbers up.
    • He did not realize he was learning while doing this activity.

multiples of 3 lego city
Multiples of  3 Lego City! Pictured here is 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15.

  1. Songs– Many people know the words to a lot of songs not because someone taught them but through hearing it repeatedly. Use this same concept with learning multiplication.

How do you learn your time tables quickly?

A great way to learn time tables quickly is through tricks. Here are some examples of tricks below…

  1. Multiples of 10 – just add a 0 to the number
    • 3 x 10 = 30 (Add 0 to 3 to make 30)
    • 4 x 10 = 40 (Add 0 to 4 to make 40)
  2.  Multiples of 11 – (double the number for number 1-9)
    • 3 x 11 = 33 (write the number 3 twice)
    • 5 x 11 = 55 (write the number 5 twice)
  3. Multiplies of 9 – (use your fingers)

Multiplication is a concept we use often in life; additionally, it is great to learn it in a fun way! Tell me how you introduce multiplication in a fun way to your child or students.

Happy Learning!

Don’t forget to Sign Up for our FREE Course of How to Teach the Alphabet in a Fun Way!

Get the password for the library with 2 Hands-On Art Activities That Will Explain Multiplication by completing this form. Once you press the GET ACCESS NOW button, we will send you an email with the password. Then go to SOY Resource Library and enter the password.

 

 

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