Black History Inventors Easy and Fun Art Projects

Black History month is in February. This is a time to celebrate the contributions of black people to our world. In our household, my son and I learn black history year round. I am fortunate to be able to teach him black history because it is not taught within many our school districts. Today we will focus on black history inventors.

This black inventors t-shirt is available on Amazon! Click the image above to purchase the tee.

My son, Cory, loves doing science experiments and wanted to learn about black history inventors and their inventions. For example, it was fascinating for him to learn that Lewis Latimer invented the carbon filament for the light bulb. This invention made the light bulb shine longer and brighter. Mr. Lewis worked very closely with Thomas Edison.

Hands-On Learning

I try to think of hands-on projects to help my son remember black history facts. Therefore, we decided to make replicas of the inventions we read about through art. Below are some of the art projects my son completed.

Black History Inventors Art Projects

One of the first black history inventors we learned about was Benjamin Banneker. At the age of 20, he took a watch apart to study the pieces and to find out how it works. In 1753, at the age of 22, he built a wooden clock from his discoveries. Many people came all over to see his clock, as it kept perfect time for more than 50 years.

To celebrate Mr. Banneker, we decided to make our own clock. Below is how we did it…

Build Your Own Clock

Materials Needed:

  • Paper Plate
  • Scissors
  • Paint
  • Paintbrush
  • Glue
  • Black Marker
  • Construction paper (2 different colors)
  • Paper Brad

Directions:

  • Have your child build their own clock like Mr. Banneker.
  • Have your child paint the paper plate.
Cory paining the paper plate.
  • Draw a long and short clock handle on the construction paper.
    • This will represent the hour and minute hands.
  • Cut the handles out of the construction paper
These are the handles for the clock.
  • On another piece of construction paper, write numbers 1-12
  • Cut the numbers out individually and paste them on the clock
  • Poke a hole in the center of the paper plate
  • Insert the paper brad through the hour hand, minute hand, and the hole in the center of the paper plate.
  • Secure the paper brad by separating the tines of the legs and bend them over to secure the paper.

 

Here’s my son’s completed clock.

Another inventor we learned about was Phillip Downing. He created the street letter box, which was a tall metal box with a secure hinged door to drop letters. Before his invention, people who wanted to send mail had to go to the Post Office. The hinged door on the metal box prevented rain and snow from entering and damaging the mail. His invention allowed for people to drop their mail off near their home and to be picked-up by a mail carrier.

Our project below honors Mr. Downing’s contributions to our world…

Make Your Own Letter Box

Materials Needed:

  • Small or Medium sized cardboard box
  • Scissors
  • Blue sheets of construction paper.
  • Glue or Tape
  • Marker

Directions:

  • Explain to your child that Philip Downing created the street letter box to save us a trip to the Post Office and to prevent our mail from becoming damaged.
  • Tape the cardboard box shut.
  • With adult supervision, cut a rectangle hole on the box.
We taped our box and cut a rectangle in the center
  • Tape any parts of the box that may have come apart.
  • Glue or tape the construction paper on the box so that it is fully covered.
Here my son is cutting blue construction paper to fit around the box.
  • Write the world “Mailbox” on the cardboard box and tape it to the front.
My son is writing the word “Mailbox” on paper
Here is our letter box to honor Philip Downing
  • Optional: Have your children write a short letter and put it in your newly created mailbox.


Our Bonus Project

This year we decided to take it a step further and create something more memorable. We made a t-shirt to honor a few of the black inventors we learned about.

Below my brother is wearing the shirts. If you want one, adult and kid T-shirts are available on Amazon.

 

Other Resources

If you are looking for an American History Curriculum, try activity packs and books by Monica Dorsey.

Click here to learn more about her organization Goose Goose Duck

Enjoy these activities!

 

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Our books are available on Amazon, “Teach Your Toddler to Read Through Play,” “Fun Easy Ways to Teach Your Toddler to Writeand “Teach Your Child About Money Through Play.

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Teaching Mathematics in Early Childhood Through Play

The Problem – I am not good at math

I have heard adults and children proclaim that they are not good at math. Some people believe this because they received bad grades in this subject in school. Furthermore, they had a difficult time understanding various mathematical concepts. Many of us believe math just comes naturally for some people. I discovered that this is simply not true. Teaching mathematics in early childhood is one way to combat this belief.

You mean people can improve their math ability?

Yes, people can improve their math abilities. I remember reading the book, Morning by Morning: How We Home-Schooled Our African-American Sons to the Ivy League by Paula Penn Nabrit. The author details why and how she homeschooled her boys. When it was time for her sons to go to college, she talked to a college admission counselor about what they look for when admitting students to their school. Of course they mentioned grades among many other aspects of a student. The counselor said good reading scores starts early in childhood; however, with practice many students can raise their math scores later in life.

How can this be done?

Dr. Ben Carson gave a lecture on PBS called, The Missing Link: The Science of Brain Health. In this talk, he gave tips on how people can optimally utilize their brain. Dr. Carson addressed the fact that many people find math difficult. He says that anyone can be good at math. Math is a subject that builds upon the previous concept. He said that when people have trouble with math it is because they failed to understand the previous concept given to them. It is important for students to go back and make sure they understand the foundational ideas before they move ahead to the next.

It just takes practice and effort.

Why is teaching mathematics in early childhood important?

When many people hear the word “mathematics” they tend to think of numbers, equations, and theories. However, math is so much more than that. It is a part of our everyday interactions and children naturally practice mathematics as a life skill whether we notice it or not.

For example, a child knows that if he or she has one cookie and his or her sibling has two cookies, then there is a difference. If a child has played with a toy for five minutes and another child played with it for fifteen minutes, they can feel the discrepancy. In the examples above, children are using mathematics to decide how they should feel about certain situations. 

If our children naturally practice these skills, why not foster their learning by connecting it to their interests and incorporating it into their play and daily routines?

We will discuss some ways to do this later.

My son is three-years-old. He was curious about multiplication after seeing the x sign. I showed him how to complete multiplication problems through drawing pictures.
In this picture my son is three-years-old. He was curious about multiplication after seeing the x sign in his play math set. I showed him how to solve multiplication problems through drawing pictures. He is solving the problem 8 x 2 =
He is writing the correct answer 16  on his V-Tech Easel.
He is writing the correct answer 16 on his V-tech easel.

What are the important mathematical skills in early childhood education?

Colors

Colors, shapes, and spatial reasoning are a few important mathematical skills in early childhood education. Colors help children organize and bring logic to their world. Identifying colors helps a child create a link between visual clues and words. Colors aid in giving children the vocabulary needed to describe the world around them, which opens up new verbal channels for them.

For instance, children often distinguish the difference between foods such as fruits and vegetables by their color. Furthermore, when your child is painting or coloring, most often they will make the sun yellow and water blue because this is familiar to them. It helps to organize their creation.

Shapes

Shapes are not only important in math, but also life in general. A child who can identify shapes will learn how letters of the alphabet are formed. This prepares them to have better handwriting skills. For instance, the letter O is basically a circle.

Also, the knowledge of shapes is useful for building, which is an introduction to engineering. My son learned a lot about what shapes to use when building certain structures with his magnetic tiles. He learned that rectangles and squares make great bases or foundations for towers. His towers are made with hexagons, squares, and triangles. From these experiences, he was able to apply his knowledge of creating basic structures to making them more sophisticated and complex.

Spacial Reasoning

A child uses visual spatial skills daily when he or she imagines where a toy in their room is located before going to get it. Another example is when a child is packing their book or duffle bag; they visualize how different items can fit together to maximize storage capacity. Furthermore, when a child puts together a puzzle, they imagine where pieces go before putting them in the correct place.

What are the methods used to teach mathematics?

There are so many methods to teaching mathematics besides worksheets. My favorite method is playful learning which may include games, hands-on activities, and the use of toys. These activities will help you to make the information active to your child. This is important because learning comes to life for a child when they do something with the information.

Examples of fun activities you can do are to go outside, collect and count rocks, and sort them by color and texture. You can also build a math activity around your child’s interests. If your child likes cars, have them construct numbers in sand or mud with their toy vehicles. You can also create a road with tape in the form of numbers. Then have your child follow the path with the cars. If you have a child that likes dolls or stuffed animals, then help them do a role play as a teacher teaching their dolls how to recognize numbers. 

The possibilities are endless!

Want more FUN ideas for teaching early childhood mathematics?

THIS BOOK IS AVAILABLE ON AMAZON!

The book above, Teaching Mathematics in Early Childhood: Simple Activities That Make Learning Math Easy and Fun has over 200 activities, tips, and resources. It will give you fun playful activities on how to expose your child to the following concepts….

  • Colors
  • Shapes
  • Spatial Reasoning
  • Sorting and Organizing
  • Number Recognition and Counting
  • Estimation
  • Measurement
  • Addition and Subtraction
  • Skip Counting and Multiplication
  • Money Recognition
  • Time

Many of the activities can be done with household items and materials. This book also gives its readers tips and resources such as children book suggestions, videos, music, toys, and playful materials.

How do I know these activities work?

These are the activities I have used to teach my son, Cory, early childhood mathematics. Currently he is five but does math on a 4th grade level.

Cory really enjoyed learning math because the activities were hands-on, playful, and fun. He connected with the concepts because he was able to experience what he was learning through engaging games. Additionally, when you use fun learning and play to expose a child to math, the information tends to stick faster.

There is a quote by Dr. Karen Purvis that says “Scientists have recently determined that it takes approximately 400 repetitions to create a new synapse in the brain – unless it is done with play, in which case, it takes between 10 and 20 repetitions!”

This is why playful learning is important, effective, and efficient!

Keep learning and having fun!

30 Spring Books for Preschoolers

Spring is such a wonderful time of the year. The weather is warm and kids are outside playing. My family and I love to go on nature walks to see the tadpoles evidently turn into frogs. My son loves to throw rocks in the water and fly his kite.

To prepare my son for spring, we start reading books about the season near the end of winter. There are countless books that will teach your child about the lifecycle of various animals, plants, and what happens to the earth during spring time.

It is wonderful to absorb the rich information in these books. However, I encourage you to couple your reading with actually experiencing spring.

Below is a video of the Walking Water Experiment. It is a great activity to teach kids how plants get water through capillary action starting in Spring. The video comes from my son’s YouTube channel called Corban’s Fun Learning Adventures. Please like and subscribe!

Below I will give you 30 spring books for preschoolers.

Let’s get started!

Little Mole is sad. Therefore, his mother teaches him about hope by leading the way out of their dark burrow into a bright world filled with the promise of spring.

Count the 10 little rubber ducks as they swim downstream on a spring day. This book has hatching chicks, a hopping bunny, blossoming flowers, and more spring-time scenes.

On a sunny springtime day, siblings Feather, Flap, and Spike set out to explore the many flowers, leaves, and seeds outside. Their day is met with difficultly by Spike’s dino-sized sneezes.

Easter is almost here and Turkey knows just how to celebrate. He’s going to win the eggstra-special Easter egg hunt! The only problem is that animals aren’t allowed to enter. What will he do?

After the cold of Winter, comes the warmth of Spring. I Am Spring takes young children on a journey through the many important events that occur uniquely in the beautiful growing season of Spring.

Celebrate the season of spring with raindrops, robins, bluebells, and butterflies! This book has colorful illustrations and are matched with rhyming, easy-to-read text that explores rain falling, flowers blooming, and other springtime wonders.

When spring comes, leaves unfurl and flowers blossom, the grass turns green, and the mounds of snow shrink. Spring brings baby birds, sprouting seeds, rain and mud, and puddles. You can read all about it in the book!

Join in the rainy-day fun, as kids splash through the puddles, affecting another weather enthusiast, a nearby worm. An imaginative and playful story, readers will love seeing the worm delight in the weather just as much as the kids.

Mole can smell that spring is in the air, but Bear is still asleep after his long winter nap! Excitedly he taps on the window and knocks on the door. He even tries playing a trumpet to wake his friend so they can celebrate together.  However, bear keeps snoozing.  

As days stretch longer, animals creep out from their warm dens, and green begins to grow again, everyone knows―spring is on its way! Join a boy and his dog as they explore nature and take a stroll through the countryside, greeting all the signs of the coming season.

Young children will enjoy learning about colors and flowers while reading this book.

This story is about the life cycle of a flower and is told through the adventures of a tiny seed. It includes a detachable seed embedded paper housed on the inside front cover.

Flitzy the butterfly welcomes back the plants and animals of spring! This book has rhymes and colorful illustrations that will delight young readers! 

The adorable baby animals in this book are fun to view and they represent life that is spring. Every young creature finally ventures outside to play as the days of winter fade away and color surround us all. 

In spring, seeds are planted and sprouts pop up through the soil. Colorful flowers bloom. Your child will see how plants come to life in spring.

Children will explore spring in the forest with this interactive Lift-a-Flap Surprise board book! Little ones will love learning all about springtime fun in the forest while following a mama deer and her sweet little fawn.

Your children will hear the forest is calling. They will also take a quiet walk through the woods, where shadows fall in the darkness, eyes peek out, and some animals sleep while others run and leap.

Up in the garden, the world is full of green. Down in the dirt there is a busy world of earthworms digging, snakes hunting, skunks burrowing, and all the other animals that make a garden their home. Children will discover all the wonders of spring.

This story helps children understand the change of seasons, the excitement of hiking, and the importance of what it means to “leave no trace.”

Ladybugs, butterflies, daddy longlegs, and roly polies are just some of the familiar creatures featured in this book. This book also has an actual size bug chart, which provides real-world comparisons so that readers know exactly how big each bug is, and the Bug-O-Meter, which lists fun facts about each bug, such as number of legs, where it lives, whether it flies, and if it stings.

Bob and Otto are best friends. They love to eat leaves, dig, and play together. When the two meet again, Otto is still the same dirt-loving earthworm, but Bob has done the unthinkable: grown wings.

Gossie and Gertie are friends waiting for Ollie to hatch. They try poking, listening, even sitting on top of his egg but, Ollie just won’t come out.

A girl observes and describes birds—their sizes, their colors, their shapes, the way they move and appear and disappear, and how they are most like her. She imagines what it would be like if clouds looked like birds, or if she could ask the birds questions.

This book includes lots of easy, smart ideas on how we can all work together to make the Earth feel good. It discusses planting a tree, using both sides of the paper, saving energy, and reusing old things in new ways.

This picture book shows the incredible metamorphosis that occurs as a tadpole loses its fishy tail and gills and becomes a frog.

Mayumie and her grandmother take a trip into Tokyo to see cherry blossoms flowering in the heart of the city.

This book teaches kids to speak up and stand up for those who can’t. With a recycling-friendly “Go Green” message, The Lorax allows young readers to experience the beauty of the Truffula Trees and the danger of taking our earth for granted.

Come explore the amazing world of bugs with this book. The bugs in this book include hungry caterpillars, busy ants, and graceful dragonflies.

Little chick may be the smallest chick on the farm, but she doesn’t know it. What she does know is that she can chirp the loudest, eat the most, and stand the tallest.

Springtime is here, and Zinnia can’t wait to plant her seeds and watch them grow. She takes care of her garden by watering her plants, weeding, and waiting patiently for something to sprout. Soon, the first seedlings appear!

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Our books are available on Amazon, “Teach Your Toddler to Read Through Play,” “Fun Easy Ways to Teach Your Toddler to Write, and “Teach Your Child About Money Through Play.

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100 Children’s Books About Money

I remember at the age of 17 my older brother, Linsey, gave me the book, Rich Dad Poor Dad by Robert Kiyosaki. This book changed my perspective about how I thought about money.

One point that stuck with me was when you are an adult your report card is your credit score. I found this statement fascinating and I made the decision to do two things after that..

  • To strive to have an excellent credit score as an adult
  • To teach my children financial literacy

Check out our new book available on Amazon, Teach Your Child About Money Through Play! It has over 110 Games/Activities, Tips, and Resources. The book is great for kids ages 4-10 and their parents.

Although my son is a preschooler, I have introduced him to money through role plays, having him count and earn real money, and reading books. 

I would like all children to be exposed to financial literacy. My contribution is by compiling this list of Children’s Book about Money. 

Sign in to our SOY Resource Library and get access to 10 ACTIVITIES TO BOOST KIDS’ FINANCIAL LITERACY KNOWLEDGE.

Let’s Get Started!

  1. Gabby Invents the Perfect Hair Bow by Erica Swallow/Li Zeng

    • At five years old, Gabby Goodwin can’t stop losing her hair bows everywhere she goes. She and her mother invent a new kind of bow that doesn’t fall out. Read this book to see if their idea works.
  2. Lily Learn about Wants and Needs by Lisa Bullard/Christine Schneider

    • Lily wants a new bike, a new raincoat, and ice cream. But how many of these things does she need? As Lily and her dad drive around town, Lily soon discovers that wants and needs are different things. 
  3. Jason Saves the Environment with Entrepreneurship by Erica Swallow/Li Zeng

    • Problem-solver Jason Li has been on a mission to pay for his own lunch since he started school. He has an idea that helps him achieve his goal and save the planet.
  4. Growing Money: A Complete Investing Guide for Kids by Gail Karlitz/Debbie Honig

    • This book is a complete guide explaining in kid-friendly terms all about savings accounts, bonds, stocks, and even mutual funds!
  5. Lemonade in Winter: A Book About Two Kids Counting Money by Emily Jenkin/G. Brian Karas

    • A lemonade stand in winter? Yes, that’s exactly what Pauline and John-John intend to have, selling lemonade and limeade. Children will learn about simple math concepts in a fun way with this book.
  6. Curious About Money by Mary E. Reid

    •  Children will learn how people, money, and history intersect, and what’s current about currency.
  7.  It’s Not Fair!: A Book About Having Enough by Caryn Riverdeneria/Isabel Moñoz

    • Roxy Ramirez has saved up for weeks to buy a chemistry set, and now she’s headed to the toy store to buy it! There’s only one problem. She keeps running into friends who are in trouble, and need her to dip into her savings to help. Will she have enough money left over to buy something for herself?
  8.  The Squirrel Manifesto by Rich Edelman/David Zabocki

    • Just as a squirrel gathers nuts to prepare for the winter—eating some now and storing some for later—kids can learn the value of money by spending some of their allowance now and saving the rest for later using animals as examples.
  9. Kidpreneurs: Young Entrepreneurs With  Big Ideas! by Adam Toren/Matthew Toren

    • This book teaches kids about starting, managing, and growing a successful business venture.
  10. What Can You Do With Money? by Jennifer Larson

    • This basic introduction to earning and spending explains how people earn incomes in exhange for their work and skill. It then explains the economic choices people make in saving or spending their income.
  11. The Big Buck Adventure by Shelley Gill/Deborah Tobola/Grace Lin

    • One little girl and one very big dollar set out on a great adventure at the store.
      What will she do with so many choices, and only one buck? Read this book to find out.
  12. Let’s Meet Ms. Money: One Step Towards Financial Literacy by Rich Grant

    • Let’s Meet Ms. Money is a children’s picture book that teaches children about money. Kids will learn what money looks like, how to count it, how and why we use money, and how we earn it.
  13.  Liktoon’s Boat: A Children’s Storybook about money, entrepreneurship, and teamwork

    • This book addresses earnings, savings, addition, subtraction, business, profits, and expenses through the characters’ adventure.
  14. A Million Gold Coins: Teaching Kids about Happiness and Money by Sigal Adler

    • Two farmers are not happy about working so hard for money. However, they may be looking for happiness in the wrong places.
  15. Everything a Kid Needs to Know about Money – Children’s Money and Saving Reference by Baby Professor

    • Teach your kids the basics about finances with this book. There’s no such thing as too early when it comes to these things. Properly seal the deal about money and other possessions by introducing this book.
  16. I Got Bank! What my Granddad Taught Me About Money by Teri Williams

    •  At ten years old, Jazz  Ellington, has over $2,000 in the bank, and his savings keep growing. His granddad taught him to save his allowance and set up a bank account. This book increases financial awareness while sharing the lives of two African-American boys growing up in the city.
  17. Dimes: To Teach Your Child About Money by Rebecca D. Turner/Lacey Braziel

    • This book teaches discipline, delayed gratification, and how good it feels to give to those in need. Dimes can teach your child the habits that will allow them to have a more financially secure and fulfilling life.
  18. Sebastian Creates A Sock Company by Erica Swallow/Li Zeng

    • Five-year-old Sebastian Martinez, with the help of his older brother, turns his love for socks into a business that not only makes wacky socks, but also enables the duo to finally revamp the school dress code. 
  19. Those Shoes by Noah Jones

    • Jeremy wants a pair of the shoes everyone at school is wearing. Jeremy’s grandma says they don’t have room for wants just needs. Read how Jeremy and his grandma navigate through this dilemma.
  20. Money for Puppy by D.L. Madson

    • This is an excellent book about saving money for something you want.
  21. The Wrong Shoes: A Book About Money and Self-Esteem by Caryn Rinadeneira

    • The Wrong Shoes teaches kids about money, hard work, self-esteem, and the real value of the things we own.
  22. The Penny Pot: Counting Coins by Stuart J. Murphy/Lynne Woodcock Cravath

    • This is a great book that shows kids how to count money how it is used, and saving to get what you want.
  23. Lemonade for Sale by Stuart Murphy/Tricia Tusa

    • Four kids and their sidekick, Petey the Parrot, run a lemonade stand. They create a bar graph to track the rise and fall of their lemonade sales.
  24. Sluggers’ Car Wash by Stuart J. Murphy/Barney Saltzberg

    • The 21st Street Sluggers’ shirts are worn-out and dirty. They need new ones, but they have no money. Children will learning to count money and make change.
  25. Arthur’s Pet Business by Marc Brown

    • Arthur starts his own petsitting business to show Mom and Dad that he can be responsible! Between a boa constrictor, an ant farm, and a group of frogs, he’s got his hands full! Can Arthur still prove he is responsible?
  26. One Proud Penny by Sandy Riegel/Serge Bloch

    • This book teaches kids that pennies are worth a lot and how it’s life can be exciting.
  27.  Money Math: Addition and Subtraction by David Adler/Edward Miller

    • Children will get an introduction to American units of money; and how they combine to make a price. They will also learn basic money symbols and the math inherent in shopping.
  28.  The Go-Around Dollar by Barbara Johnston-Adams/Joyce Audy Zarins

    • Children will learn how the dollar is made, the meaning of the symbols that are shown on the front and back of the dollar, and how long the average dollar stays in circulation?
  29. Arthur’s Funny Money by William Hoban

    • Arthur attempts to earn enough money to buy a t-shirt and cap, assisted by his sister Violet. Children will learn simple business concepts by reading this story.
  30. The Original Story of the Piggy Bank: The Beginning of a Legend! by Lance Douglas

    • This book gives background information on the piggy bank. It also contains powerful lessons of discipline, sacrifice and responsibility.
  31. You Wouldn’t Live Without Money by Professor Alex Woolf/David Antram

    • This book uses humorous cartoons  to tell the story of money, from early bartering to the making of metal and paper currencies.
  32. DK Eyewitness Books: Money: Discover the Fascinating  Story of Money from Silver Ingot to Smart Cards by Joe Cribb

    • Children will learn about the earliest forms of money to the banking systems we have today.
  33.  Dollars and Sense: A Kid’s Guide to Using – Not Losing- Money by Elaine Scott/David Clark

    • Dollars & Sense is a basic instruction manual for money that will teach readers about the history of money, the way the American economy works, and how to make important decisions about personal finance.
  34.  Dollars and Sense by Stan Berenstain/Jan Berenstain

    • Papa thinks it’s time to teach Brother and Sister how to budget their money. Children journey with the cubs on their process to understand the value of a dollar.
  35.  A Chair for My Mother by Vera B. Williams

    • After their home is destroyed by a fire, Rosa, her mother, and grandmother save their coins to buy a really comfortable chair for all to enjoy.
  36. Rock, Brock, and the Savings Shock by Sheila Bair/Barry Gott

    • Rock and Brock are twins and their grandpa offers them a plan―for ten straight weeks on Saturday he will give them each one dollar. But there is a catch!  Each buck they save, he’ll match it quick. If they spend it, there’s no extra dough.
  37. When Times are Tough by Yanitzia Canetti/Romont Willy

    • This book follows a family that faces very real economic challenges. They show how they are able to overcome with each other.
  38. The Kids’ Money Book: Earning, Saving, Spending, Investing, Donating by Jamie McGillian

    • This book explains how to create a budget, make money, invest your earnings, and donate to charity. It also teaches kids the difference between needs and wants and getting the most from an allowance.
  39. Once Upon A Dime: A Math Adventure by Nancy Kelly Allen/Adam Doyle

    • This book is about a  farmer discovering  trees that grows different types of money.  This book teaches kids about the value of money
  40. How to Turn $100 to $1,000,000: Earn! Save! Invest! by Jenna McKenna/Jeannine Glista

    • Children will learn the basics of earning, saving, spending, and investing money.
  41.  Ella Earns Her Own Money by Lisa Bullard/Mike Moran
    • Ella wants a soccer ball, but she doesn’t have enough money to buy one. She decides to earn her own money. Will she earn enough to buy the ball? Read this book to find out!
  42.  Kyle Keeps Track of Cash by Lisa Bullard/Mike Byrne

    • Kyle’s club is going camping and all the kids will sell Cool Candy to earn money for the trip. Kyle needs to find buyers for ten boxes of candy. Can he keep track of his cash and join his friends on the camping trip? Read this book to find out!
  43. What Does It Means to be an Entrepreneur by Rana Diorio/Emma Dryden

    • When Rae witnesses an ice cream and dog mishap, she’s inspired to create a solution to help get dogs clean. Rae draws on her determination and everyone else in her community when she learns what it means to be an entrepreneur.
  44.  A Smart Girl’s Guide: Money: How to Make It, Save It, and Spend It by Nancy Holyoke/Brigette Barrager
    • Children will learn how to not only spend money, but also how to earn it. The quizzes, tips, and helpful quotes from other girls will make learning about money management easy and fun.
  45. The History of Money by Martin Jenkins/Satoshi Kitamura

    • This book teaches children the following questions about money:  When did we start using it? And why? What does money have to do with writing? And how do taxes and interest work?
  46. Curious George Saves his Pennies by H.A. Rey

    • When George decides to save up for a red train in the toy store, he doesn’t realize how long it will take or how hard he’ll have to work for his money. Read this book and find out if he gets the train.
  47.  Piggy Bank Problems by Fran Manuskkin/Tammie Lyon
    • Katie’s dad works at a bank  but she prefers to keep her money in her piggy bank. Read about what happens when she drops her piggy and it breaks?
  48.  Deena’s Lucky Penny by Barbara Derubertis/Cynthia Fisher

    • Deena has a big problem. Her mom’s birthday is coming, but she has no money to buy a present! Find out how she solves the problem by reading this book.
  49. Follow Your Money: Who Gets it, Who Spends it, Where Does it Go? by Kevin Sylvester/Michael Hlinka, Julia Beck

    • Find out what happens to your money after you hand it to the cashier. What happens to that money once it leaves your hands? Who actually pockets it or puts it into the bank? Read this book to answer these questions.
  50.  Currency by Andrew Einspruch
    • The book gives an introduction to currency through the history of money around the world, minting coins and printing paper money.
  51. Feeding Piggy by Kathy Mashburn/Freida Talley

    • Maddy has a piggy bank named Piggy. One morning while feeding Piggy coins for breakfast, Maddy discovers how coins, like people, come in different shapes and sizes.
  52.  A Dollar, A Penny How Much and How by Lerner Publications
    • This humorous book shows young readers how to count and combine pennies, nickels, fives, tens, and more!
  53.  Sophie the Zillonaire by Lara Bergen/Laura Tallardy

    • When Sophie finds fifty dollars on the sidewalk, it gives her a great idea for a new name: Sophie the Zillionaire! In order to keep the name Sophie the Zillionaire, Sophie has to make more money — and fast.
  54. Berenstain Bears Trouble with Money by Stan Berenstain

    • Mama and Papa are worried that Brother and Sister seem to think money grows on trees. The cubs decide to start their very own businesses, from a lemonade stand to a pet-walking service.
  55.  Just Saving Money by Mercer Mayer

    • Little Critter® wants a new skateboard and Dad tells him that he needs to save his own money to buy it! From feeding the dog to selling lemonade, Little Critter learns the value of a dollar.
  56. Lots and Lots of Coins by Margarette S. Reid/True Kelley

    • This book is about a boy spending the day with Dad coin collecting!  He finds out about the value of coins, what people used before coins, and why historical images and people appear on coins.
  57.  A Dollar for Penny by Julie Glass/Joy Allen

    • A young girl sets up a lemonade stand and sells enough cups of refreshment to add up to a dollar.  This story combines the teaching of addition with  childhood entrepreneurship!  
  58. The Young Investor by Katherine Bateman

    • The book explains the concept of money and  how saving works based on the concepts of simple and compound interest. Children then learn where Wall Street is located, what stocks and bonds do, and, the right way to buy or sell a stock, mutual fund, or savings bond.
  59. You can’t buy a Dinosaur with a Dime by Harriet Ziefert

    •  Pete saves his allowance and spends too much of it. He then has second thoughts and starts over. Children will learn how he strategizes over future purchases. 
  60. Not Your Parents’ Money Book: Making, Saving, and  Spending Your Own Money by Jean Chatzsky/Erwin Haya

    • This book will reach kids before bad spending habits can get out of control. With answers and ideas from real kids, this grounded approach to spending and saving will be a welcome change for kids who are inundated by a consumer driven culture.
  61.  Money Math with Sebastian Pig and Friends by Jill Anderson
    • This book introduces children to identifying, counting and comparing money through a farmer’s market trip with Sebastian Pig and Louie.
  62.  Money Madness by David Adler and Edward Miller
    • Children will be provided with a guide to economics and the purpose and value of money with this book.
  63. Coins and Other Currency by Tamra Orr

    • Follow a class of fifth-graders as they figure out the world of finance, including earning, budgeting, and saving to investing and collecting coins from around the world.
  64.  Show Me the Money by David Alder

    • Show Me the Money takes technical terms and breaks it down with easy-to-understand text, diagrams, and illustrations making a formerly dry subject interesting and relevant to kids
  65.  One Cent, Two Cents, Old Cent New Cent: All About Money by Bonnie Worth/Aristides Ruiz
    • The Cat in the Hat disqualifies the notion that money grows on trees with the study of money and its history.
  66.  Money, Money Honey Bunny by Marilyn Sadler/Roger Bollem
    • Honey Bunny Funny Bunny has a lot of money. She saves some and spends some on herself and friends. This is a rhyming book about spending and saving, told through the eyes of animals.
  67.  Mr. Chickee’s Funny Money by Christopher Paul Curtis

    • Mr. Chickee, a blind man in the neighborhood, gives 9-year-old Steven a mysterious bill with 15 zeros on it and the image of a familiar face. Could it be a quadrillion dollar bill? Could it be real? Read this book to find out.
  68. Cash, Credit Cards or Checks by Nancy Leewen

    • Children will learn how people pay for the things they buy by writing a check, paying with a debit card, paying with a credit card, and paying with cash withdrawn from an ATM.
  69. Taxes, Taxes!: Where the Money Goes by Nancy Leewen

    • Provides an introduction to taxes, including some of the products and services that citizens may receive including schools, roads, and national defense.
  70. In the Money: A Book About Banking by Nancy Leewen

    • Provides an introduction to banks and banking, including what the workers do, why customers come into banks, and explains what happens to old money.
  71.  The Kids Guide to Money Cent$ by Keltie Thomas/Stephen MacEachern

    • The Money Cent$ gang, three kids with very different money “personalities,” will help teach your child about money.
  72.  All About Money by Erin Roberson
    • This book introduces children to money,  while describing the concepts of earning, saving, and spending.
  73. Money Sense for Kids by Hollis Harman

    • This book answers the following questions about money: How and where is it printed? What do all those long numbers and special letters on currency mean? How are the newly designed bills improvements over the old ones?How can banks afford to pay interest?
  74. The Kids’ Money Book: Earning, Saving, Spending, Investing, Donating by Jamie Kyle McGillian

    •  This books explains how to create a budget, make money, invest your earnings, and donate to charity. 
  75. Money: A Rich History by Jon R. Anderson

    • Children will learn about the history of money with tons of cool facts,  illustrations, and photographs of coins and money from all over the world.
  76. Follow the Money by Loreen Leady

    • George, a newly minted quarter on his way to the bank, has quite a day. He’s about to be traded, spent, lost, found, donated, dropped into a vending machine, washed in a washing machine, and generally passed all around town.
  77. Double Fudge by Judy Blume

    • Fudge is obsessed with money. He’s making his own “Fudge Bucks” and has plans to buy the entire world. However, things get crazy once his family gets involved.
  78. The Big Buck Adventure by Shelley Gill

    • Follow the journey of a girl who tries to decide what she can get with her dollar in a candy shop, toy store, deli, and pet department.
  79.  A Dollar for Penny by Julie Grass/Joy Allen

    • On a summer day, a young girl sets up a lemonade stand and sells enough cups  to add up to a dollar.  This story combines the teaching of addition with a traditional rite of childhood entrepreneurship!  
  80. My Rows and Piles of Coins by Tolowa Mollel/E.B. Lewis

    • Saruni is saving coins for a red and blue bicycle. How happy he will be when he can help his mother carry heavy loads to market on his very own bicycle. How disappointed he is to discover that he hasn’t saved nearly enough!
  81. Isabel’s Car Wash by Sheila Bair/Judy Stead

    • The Nelly Longhair doll is on sale at Murphy’s Toys for ten dollars, but Isabel has only fifty cents. Isabel decides to start a car wash business. Will Isabel  earn enough for the Nelly doll?
  82. Prices, Prices, Prices by David Adler

    • In simple language  and colorful pictures, this book gives an introduction to economics explaining the basic laws of supply and demand.
  83.  Uncle Jed’s Barbershop by Margaree King Mitchell/James Ransome
    • This is a story of a man who spends his life struggling, saving, and sacrificing to build and own his own barbershop. Although there were many racial difficulties that stood in his way,  he opens the doors of his new shop  at the age of seventy-nine.
  84. Round and Round the Money Goes: What Money Is and How We Use It by Melvin Berger/Gilda Berger

    • This book explains the development of money from its origins in the barter system to its modern usage as cash, checks, and credit cards.
  85. How the Second Grade Got $8,205.50 to Visit the Statue of Liberty by Nathan Zimelman/Bill Slavin

    • A second grade class wants to visit the Statue of Liberty. They try to earn money for the trip by collecting paper, running a lemonade stand, sitting babies, walking dogs, and selling candy.
  86.  Benny’s Pennies by Pat Brisson

    • Benny McBride starts his day with five new pennies and is determined to spend them all. His family wants him to buy certain items. Will he be able to fulfill their requests?
  87. If You Made a Million by David Schwartz/Steven Kellogg

    • Have you ever wanted to make a million dollars? Marvelosissimo, the Mathematical Magician, is able to explain how to  earn money, invest it, accrue dividends and interest, and watch savings grow. 
  88. National Geographic Kids Everything Money: A Wealth of Facts, Photos, and Fun by Kathy Furgang

    • Kids will learn about money around the world from a National Geographic expert. This book is packed with fun facts and amazing photographs.
  89. My Pink Piggy Bank by Rozanne Williams

    • The book teaches kids the importance of saving.
  90. The Piggybank Blessing by Stan and Jan Berenstain

    • The Bear cubs like to spend money. Find out if the new piggy bank Mama bought will help teach Brother and Sister about saving money.
  91. The History of Money by Patricia Armentrout

    • This book examines the history of money, including the barter system, early trade in North America, unusual types of money such as huge stone disks and salt bars, and the first paper money.
  92. American Currency by Patricia Armentrout

    • This book introduces kids to the characteristics and values of the different coins and paper money used as currency in the United States.
  93.  A Quarter from the Tooth fairy by Caren Holzman

    • This book uses simple math concepts in an easy-to-read story plus six pages of math activities for parents and children to enjoy together.
  94. Pigs Will Be Pigs: Fun with Math and Money by Amy Axelrod/Sharon McGinley-Nally

    • The pigs are very hungry, and there’s no food in the house. Mr. Pig suggests eating out but there is no money! The family goes on a money hunt. Read to see if they find what they are looking for.
  95. The Monster Money Book by Loreen Leedy

    • This book teaches children about  borrowing, saving, and spending money. It  also makes many connections to the real world.
  96.  Jasmine Launches a Startup (Entrepreneurship Books for Kids) by Barhar Karroum/Jesus Vazquez Prada
    • This book will teach children how to start a business, to focus on a specific market, and to take risks.
  97. Kid Start-Up: How YOU Can Become an Entrepreneur by Mark Cuban/Shaan Patel

    • The book will help children how to discover a winning idea, launch their business, and start making money.
  98.  Rachel Turns Her Passion Into Business (Entrepreneur Kid) by Erica Swallow/Li Zeng
    • Teen lacrosse player Rachel Zietz takes an entrepreneurship course and realizes she can blend the worlds of business and fun by creating a lacrosse equipment company. 
  99.  Marvel’s of Money for Kids: Five Fully Illustrated Stories about Money and Financial Decisions for Life by Paul Nourigat

    • This is a book about money in which kids will like to read. There are five stories with conclusions and lessons learned. 
  100.  Why is there money? A Visual and Poetic Journey Through the History of Money by Paul Nourigat

    • This book teaches kids the history of money. It teaches the evolution of money in a simple way.

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Teach Your Toddler to Read Through Play – Over 130 Games/Activities and Tips

Your three-year-old son can read on a third grade level? How?

Just this past weekend, I saw my three-year-old son, Cory, reading a book to his Sunday School teacher and a group of kids.  As soon as the teacher saw me, she said “This child can read at three-years-old? How did you do this?” When someone asks me this, my short answer is always by making reading fun, exposure to a variety of books, and playing with words.

Then later that day, I took my son to another child’s home for a birthday party. The kids were having so much fun playing inside and outside. At one point, Cory was  playing with the Leapfrog letter set at the refrigerator and spelling words. He asked the birthday boy’s mother, who is a teacher, for the letter T in order to spell the word gift.  After spelling, the boy’s mom approached me and said “I can’t believe your son spelled gift!” I replied by saying “Yes, he loves to read and spell!” She said “How did you do this?” Again, I gave her my normal answer.

The book is available on Amazon! Click the image above to access the link.

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Is your son a genius?

Parents and teachers are usually amazed to know that my son was reading at 21 months. Right now, he can read on a third-grade level. They often say “He is a genius!” I think ALL CHILDREN ARE BORN GENUISES! Cory was born with the same capilibities as every other child. He was just exposed to words and language in a fun way at an early age. In my opinion, any child can do this!

Why did you teach your son to read so early?

It was not my intention to teach Cory to read as a toddler. I didn’t think he would learn the alphabet until the age of three or four. My objective was to expose him to words and language so he wouldn’t be a late communicator. In my experience as a social worker/play therapist, I noticed children who couldn’t speak would resort to hitting or kicking out of frustration. However, once they developed language this behavior would decrease because they could communicate their needs and wants. 

As I started exposing Cory to words through play and reading, I noticed that he liked what I was doing. After reading a book to him as a baby, he would take the book and give it back to me. He wanted me to read it again. I remember my husband read the book, Brown Bear Brown Bear What Do You See ten times in a row to Cory at one time. He enjoyed the interactive activities and games we played, which I used to exposed him to new words daily. He has always loved playing with letters, learning the phonics, and blending sounds. Finally, there came a point were he had a desire to seek meaning from words through reading!

Watch my three-year-old son read the book, Charlotte’s Web. A book for children ages 8 and up.

Why is reading a struggle for some kids?

Reading is boring.

Some kids think reading is boring. Many young children spend their days playing. Then once the child turns five or six-years-old, adults tell the child that they have to sit down, focus, and learn to read. Learning to read can be a frustrating process for some kids. It takes time and concentration because one of the best ways to become a better reader is to read. This can be difficult for the child who is a kinesthetic learner, as most kids are, and loves to be physical and experience what they are learning. 

My Child is not trying hard enough

Sometimes when a child is behind on their appropriate reading level, the teacher will tell the parents. Parents usually get nervous and upset by this information, and these emotions transfer to the child. During home reading sessions, the parents get frustrated with the child because “they are not trying hard enough.” This most often leads kids to having a negative view of reading. They will often tell their parents “I hate reading!” In turn the parents become more upset because their child is behind their classmates and they are unable to motivate the child to read.

Parents don’t know where to start

Teaching a child to read can be an overwhelming task. First, you have to learn the alphabet, phonics, blending sounds, sight words, and the various rules of the English language. Parents may have a child that knows the alphabet and phonics but is having difficulty with teaching them sight words. Flashcards are often used to teach sight words, but again the child thinks this is SO BORING!

Furthermore, if a child is reading a book with a lot of words they are unfamiliar with, they may get irritated and want to do something else. Additionally, how do you explain that the word bat can be an animal and a tool used for baseball? Oh and when you see the letters PH together, you should make the F sound. Also, C can make the short sound like in cat or the long sound like in cell.

My Child won’t sit during reading time.

I have heard many parents complain that their child doesn’t want to sit and read an entire book. As parents are reading, the child may look in space and not pay attention. Or if the child can read, they get distracted by something happening in the background. Sometimes a parent may read the first few pages of a book to a child but the story line is boring which causes their mind to wonder.

My Child is uninterested in reading about the topic.

A big reason why some kids don’t like to read is because they are uninterested in the topic. This often happens when kids have to read school textbooks or remember facts that they have no connection to. The kids are wondering why they have to know this information. Parents and teachers are trying to get their children to retain the information and it is just not happening for the child. This can be a pretty difficult situation to navigate.

Below are questions many parents have about reading…

What age should a child learn to read?

Most kids start learning to read at 6 or 7. Some kids start earlier at the age of 4 or 5. I believe children have the ability to recognize words earlier. My son started recognizing words at nine months. 

One day my son and I were playing in the basement. I asked him to get the book, Brown Bear Brown Bear out of the bin. Out of the 12 books in the bin, he picked the correct title.

My son was able to blend sounds to make words at 21 months. The only reason he did this so early was because he was exposed to it as a baby. However, all children learn at different times and levels. They also learn with various methods. It is important to concentrate on your child’s level and their readiness to learn.

Watch the video below to see my son spelling at 21 months old

How can I help my child learn to read?

There are countless ways to teach kids to read. Kids learn through reading, talking with others, story-telling, workbooks, digital media and technology, learning phonics and sight words, blending sounds, writing, and asking questions. 

I used playful in-depth learning to teach Cory to read. This included fun activities like singing, dancing, playing with blocks, magnetic tiles, Playdoh, drawing, games, role- play, writing stories with paint and sidewalk chalk, going outside to play and reading. It is important to read books that interest your child so they will gain the curiosity to seek meaning from words.

What if my child is not interested in a certain topic?

Children will be interested in reading when there is a connection to what they are learning. I remember in high school disliking my geography class because I felt no connection to other countries. My interest in geography did not come alive until I started to travel internationally while in college. 

Let’s say you want your child to learn about other countries, then observe your child and see what they like and offer a connection. For the child who loves sports, have them read about Sports played in the countries. If your daughter loves princesses, have them read about princesses around the world.

How long should a child read each day?

Children should read at least 20 minutes a day. However, if a parent is doing formal reading lessons then all you need is 15 minutes a day. Outside of the 15 minutes, please know that reading can take place anywhere. Children can read a dinner menu, playground signs, grocery list, captions on their favorite cartoon. 

How do I help my child who is struggling with reading?

First, you must define what struggling means. If you are comparing your child with other kids in the classroom or the national standards of reading and they are below their level, then yes they maybe struggling. However, if you don’t compare them to anyone, you may realize that they just need more time to get the concept. 

When a child needs more time with reading, ensure you are teaching to their learning styles. 

Auditory learners love to learn through hearing. Great activities for them would be to read books based on songs and retelling stories you have read and adding music with DIY instruments like banging the bottom of an oatmeal container. Visual learners use sight to learn. They would enjoy drawing and painting colorful stories and doing word puzzles and games with colorful pictures. Kinesthetic learners love explore the world through touch and movement. Try building model sets based on books and doing a Treasure Word Hunt Game would be fun for them. 

In my opinion, the best way for children to learn to read is through playful in-depth and natural wholesome interaction. It is the best way to create a desire in children to read. 

This is why I have written the ebook, Teach Your Toddler to Read Through Play: A Detailed Account With Over 130 Games/Activities, Tips, and Resources.

My goal is to help you expose your child to words and reading in a fun way. This book will take you through a step by step process of how I taught my son to read. It gives you games/activities to do with your child along the way to make reading a process that is fun, natural, and interesting! It will help spark your child’s curiosity in wanting to seek meaning from words which is essentially reading. 

This book provides the following…

  • A detailed account of how I taught my son to read
  • Over 130 Reading Games/Activities and Resources
  • How to expose your child to new words through play
  • The types of books to start your child’s reading journey
  • How to encourage curiosity in your child
  • Child brain development and how to develop faster connections in your baby’s brain
  • How to expose newborn and babies to words through play and bonding
  • How my son was able to recognize words as a baby
  • How to make rereading books fun for you and your child
  • Simple ways to create a literacy rich home
  • The MOST important thing you can do as a parent to encourage reading in your household
  • How songs and dancing assisted in teaching my son to read.
  • How to take full advantage of the FREE Services at your Local library
  • How Physical Activities can boost your child’s reading skills
  • How to Teach the Alphabet in a Fun Way
  • How to Teach the Phonics, Blending Sounds, and Sight Words in a Fun Way
  • The three basic learning styles in children
  • How to determine your child’s learning style
  • How to expose children to new concepts aligned with their learning style
  • How children with certain learning styles tend to communicate
  • The toys/activities children with certain learning styles tend to favor
  • How to make learning fun and playful for children
  • How to determine the best time to teach your child
  • How to execute Fun In-Depth Learning
  • How to use the body’s senses to teach your child
  • How to combine In-depth learning and learning styles during play
  • How to incorporate digital media in your child’s learning
  • How to teach a child with more than one learning style
  • How to Structure your Day
  • How to progress to teaching your child the phonics
  • How Writing and Art can build a child’s reading skills
  • How to Use Real World Experiences and Field Trips to expose children to language.
  • How to Choose Books your Child will Like to Read.
  • Strategies for When your Child Loses Interest in Reading.
  • Examples of toys we used
  • Examples of books we read through our journey
  • Once your child begins to read, how to continue to build their skills.

Here is What Others are Saying About the Book

“This was a wonderfully detailed account of not only how to teach your child to read, but also how to connect with your child, support your child in a lifetime of loving to learn, and use your time caring for your child in a meaningful, fulfilling way. I am inspired as a mother, and I wish I’d known about this sooner!

I thought it was very well written, and the flow was perfect. The book flowed seamlessly from one chapter to the next, and I felt like it was organized perfectly.”

-Stacey

“This is a wonderful guidebook for parents who want to help their children begin learning at an early age through play. It is an introduction on how to nurture a love of learning and proficiency in reading in children, which in turn will open the door for your child to be exposed to and learn about a variety of topics.  Andrea incorporates several learning styles in order to pave the way for a lifetime of learning.

I look forward to incorporating some of these techniques into playtime with my little learners.”

-Danielle J.

“This book documents the journey of an engaged parent who used creative and fun ways to introduce her son to books. This led to the child’s continuous interest in letters, words, sentences and naturally, reading. If you are willing to invest the time in incorporating the tips in this book with your child, he or she will also develop an interest in books and learn to read during the early stages of brain development. This book is an excellent example of the African Proverb “Each One Teach One.”

-Linsey Mills

This is a great e-book for parents with children ages 0-7! Invest in your child’s future. Reading is the most powerful tool to promote creativity, increase brain power, and it helps your child express themselves better! The best way to teach a child to spell and grammar rules is not through flashcards and worksheets but through reading and play!

Not Sure Yet? Then Complete the Form at the Bottom of this Post to Read the First Chapter for Free!

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4 Fun & Simple Activities/Games That will Teach Kids about Germs

germs activities

As adults, we most likely want  to prevent children from getting sick. It disturbs their playtime and they often look helpless lying in bed during an illness. One way to keep kids healthy is to teach them how to prevent germs.

I have provided 4 FUN and SIMPLE activities that will complete this mission! These activities will have your child wanting to help with chores and pinpoint the importance of good hygiene.

Learn How to Teach Kids to Cover their Mouths in a Fun Way

Let’s get started by answering basic questions about germs/microbes.

How are germs spread by hands?

 When you cough or sneeze, this is the lungs’ way of doing their job to force bad germs/microbes out. Some people cough in their hands if they don’t have a tissue.  Coughing in your hands leads to germs being left there. When you touch anything such as a doorknob, pen, sink, utensils, or someone else’s hand, you will spread germs.

How can you prevent germs from spreading?

 There are good and bad germs. You want to keep good germs and get rid of bad germs. Good germs can help make vitamins that your body needs. Foods that increase good bacteria or germs are asparagus, beans, spinach, and bananas.

One way to prevent bad germs from spreading is to cough or sneeze into a tissue or elbow. Furthermore, if you don’t cover up at all while sneezing and coughing, the germs can go really far. Some germs can travel 100 miles (160km) per hour and spread over 100,000 more.

Another way to prevent germs is to wash your hands frequently with soap. Soap helps to remove dirt and microbes. Hand washing should occur before eating, after using the bathroom, when playtime is complete, after using public transportation, or visiting public places.

DO THIS SCIENCE EXPERIMENT TO TEACH KIDS HOW SOAP HELPS REMOVE DIRT AND OIL

How can kids prevent germs?

 Germs can enter the body through the mouth, nose, breaks in the skin, eyes and genitals (privates). Below are 5 ways to prevent germs…

  1. Using tissues to wipe and blow your nose.
  2. Staying home from school when you are sick.
  3. Keep hands out of mouth.
  4. Do not use other’s forks, spoons, or drink from the same cup. 
  5. Teach kids to wash their hands.

 

How do you teach a child to wash their hands?

Have kids do the following steps to wash their hands…

  1. Wet their hands with warm or cold water.
  2. Use soap to lather their hands while singing “Happy Birthday” twice.
  3. Scrub between fingers, on the backs of hands, and under nails.
  4. Rinse well and dry with a clean towel.

 Tip: Create a colorful chart with the steps above and display in all bathrooms.

Here’s a Great Book that Teaches Kids about Germs

Have you ever asked a child to wash their hands and they asked “Why?” The story, Do not lick this book* by Idan Ben-Barak and Julian Frost, provides a fun and engaging way to answer this question.

How this Book makes Learning about Germs Fun!

This book is about an oval shaped microbe character named Min, who teaches children about germs, by going on an adventure. Min begins her journey ON the book and involves readers by asking them to take her various places.

For example, the book says “Let’s take Min on an adventure! See the circle on the next page? That’s where Min lives. Touch the circle with your finger to pick her up. Min is now on your finger!”

Taking your Child on a Germ Journey

During Min’s travels, she meets friends and takes them along the way. Somehow Min and Rae end up on the reader’s shirt! At each stop, the authors show children a microscopic view of their destination. Additionally, commentary from other microbes explain how they function. While Min and Rae on are the reader’s shirt, one microbe says “Can you give me a hand spreading this dirt around?” Another microbe says “We’re making this shirt smell.”

While Min and friends are on the reader’s belly button, one microbe asks, “Did I tell you about the time soap got all the way in here? Another microbe replies “I don’t like scary stories!” This book teaches children the importance of brushing their teeth, washing clothes, and taking a bath in a humorous manner.

At the end, the authors show readers what microbes really look like and where they can be found.

Let’s apply it with 4 FUN Activities!

 Use the activities below to….

  1. Teach your Child about germs.
  2. Encourage them to help with chores.
  3. Promote Hygiene and Self-Care.

 

I do these activities with my son and he loves it!

Create the Germ/Microbe

  1. Have your child draw a germ/microbe.
  2. Tell the child to give the microbe a name.
  3. Have your child draw the microbe a friend and name it.
  4. Tell your child the microbe is going to travel to three places…
    • Their clothes
    • On their teeth
    • On their hands
  5. Tell your child you are going to get rid of the germs by doing the next three activities.

Laundry

  1. Explain to children that microbes get on our clothes and make them dirty and stinky.
  2. While doing laundry have your child help you put the clothes in the dryer and washing machine.
  3. While your child is handling the clothes say the following…
    • “Let’s get the Microbes off the clothes by putting them in washing machine.
  4. Make it fun and urgent by saying the following…
    • “Oh no! The microbes are multiplying let’s put them in the washing machine quickly!
    • Make it into a race against the Microbes.

Brushing Teeth

  1. Explain to children that microbes get on our teeth and cause tooth decay and cavities.
  2. Explain that cavities are holes in your teeth.
  3. The microbes also cause your breathe to stink.
  4. These microbes love sugars like candy.
  5. In order to get them off, they must floss and brush their teeth.
  6. While your child is brushing their teeth say the following..
    • “Hurry Hurry, the microbes are running because they know we are about to brush your teeth!
    • Let’s brush your teeth to remove them now!”
    • I hear the microbes saying, “No, No don’t brush your teeth! We don’t like the smell of toothpaste!”
  7. When your child is rinsing their mouth and spitting, say the following…
    • “The microbes are down the drain and they are yelling “No, No!”

Washing Hands

  1. Explain to children that microbes get on our hands as we touch various things like the doorknob and sink.
  2. We often touch our noses, mouths, and eyes allowing microbes to come into our bodies and make us sick.
  3. We need to wash our hands to decrease our chances of getting sick.
  4. While your child is washing their hands, laugh and say the following…
    • “We are going to get those microbes by washing our hands with soap!”
    • “The microbes are scared of soap so let’s keep scrubbing!”
  5. When your child is rinsing their hands, say the following…
    • “The microbes are down the drain and they are yelling “No, No!”
    • “Yes! We conquered the microbes!”

When I forget to do these activities, my son usually asks me to play the Microbe Games!

Get creative with your children on how to remove microbes!

Here is a fun science experiment that teaches kids how soap removes dirt and oil when washing their hands. This video comes from my son’s YouTube Channel, Corban’s Fun Learning Adventures. Please like and subscribe for fun learning activities every Tuesday!

Bonus Tip: 

Here are Fun Chore Charts for Kids of All Ages

Happy Cleaning!

OUR KID FRIENDLY FAST & FUN STUDY TRICKS FOR BETTER GRADES: 9 FUN STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS IN LEARNING AND SCHOOL HAS $29 OFF THE ORIGINAL PRICE.

Our books are available on Amazon, “Teach Your Toddler to Read Through Play,” “Fun Easy Ways to Teach Your Toddler to Write, and “Teach Your Child About Money Through Play.

THE TEACH YOUR TODDLER TO READ THROUGH PLAY ONLINE COURSE HAS A $97 DISCOUNT.

Click here for the PAYMENT PLAN OPTION!

How Dads Can Help Children Become Better Readers

How Dads Can Help Children Become Better Readers

The Benefit of Dads Reading Aloud to Their Kids

I remember going to the local library and listening to an Education Expert lecture about the importance of reading aloud to your children. This expert said children whose dads read to them are more likely to become avid readers in adulthood.  One of the reasons is men’s lower voices tend to command more attention and sometimes can be better heard from children due to the lower frequency of the sound wave. For example, people with slight hearing loss find it easier to hear men’s voices than women and children’s voices.  Also, a Harvard University study found that dads reading bedtime stories is better for children’s language development.

How Can Dads Help a Child Become a Better Reader?

Dads should read aloud to their child frequently. Also, children can observe how their dad enunciates words and his reading rhythm. Furthermore,  do hands-on activities where the child can experience the words in the book. For example, if the child is reading about animals on Wednesday, take the book with you to the zoo on Saturday. Show the child the animals in the book while observing them at the zoo. This allows the child to see the words and experience it simultaneously. Below is a video of Read Aloud Strategies to Make Books Fun For Kids!

How do Books Help Children’s Development?

Children will learn life skills through experience. However, books can help a child’s development because they see how book characters solve problems and handle difficult situations. This is why it’s important for dads to read various types of books frequently to their children. The child receives a male’s perspective on how to handle issues through discussion encouraged from reading books. Also dads are given the opportunity to discuss a variety of topics through books which can range from friendship to feelings and emotion.

A Fun Book Dads Can Read to Children

*This post contains affiliate links, which means I receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you, if you make a purchase using the links.
These reasons, along with others, is why I like to find books where a dad is one of the main characters. I found a book, Be Glad Your Dad Is Not an Octopus! by Matthew Logelin, Sara Jensen, and Jared Chapman, that is entertaining and educational.

Why We Like This Book

Along with the benefit of dads reading aloud, this book highlights the positive aspects of fathers such as telling funny stories or singing silly songs. It also stresses the negative side of dads, from a kid’s perspective, like being bossy or grouchy. Sometimes kids wish their dad’s were someone else, but the author warns children to be careful what they wish for because it be could way worse. The book gives humorous scenarios of how it could be worse. One page reads, “Be glad your dad is not a tortoise because everything would take forever.” Another example is “Be glad your dad is not a Dung Beetle, because he would pile poop in your room, (Seriously, that would be really gross.)”

Fun Educational Components of the Book

The animals discussed in this book provide children with insight on how they function. At the end, the author gives more information about each animal in the book. When dung beetles pile poop and eat it, they help rid the earth of it. If they didn’t, the whole world would be covered in it! My husband and son had a great time reading this book! My son found this funny and entertaining!!!

Fun Ideas to Supplement Book

Take it a step further and do a fun activity to supplement this book. Below are some ideas…
  1. Role play a tortoise and do everything around the house slowly.
  2. Get a balled up brown sock, representing poop, and leave it beside your child’s bed.
    • Leave a note saying “Daddy the Dung Beetle left this poop for you!”
Get this book and let your child laugh and learn while dad reads. P.S. If dad is not present, get other family members and friends, like granddads, uncles, and mentors, to read to your child. Happy Reading! OUR KID FRIENDLY FAST & FUN STUDY TRICKS FOR BETTER GRADES: 9 FUN STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS IN LEARNING AND SCHOOL HAS $29 OFF THE ORIGINAL PRICE. Our books are available on Amazon, “Teach Your Toddler to Read Through Play,” “Fun Easy Ways to Teach Your Toddler to Write, and “Teach Your Child About Money Through Play.THE TEACH YOUR TODDLER TO READ THROUGH PLAY ONLINE COURSE HAS A $97 DISCOUNT. Click here for the PAYMENT PLAN OPTION!

Holiday Laugh-Out-Loud Jokes for Kids

HolidayLaughOut LoudJokesForKids

Wouldn’t it be great for your family to have access to Laugh-Out-Loud Jokes for Kids this holiday?

This time of the year promotes relaxation, reminiscing, and laughter with family. Below, I have provided you with jokes to share with your loved ones after you all have opened your presents!

Children and adults will have a great time guessing the answers.

These jokes came from the book The Complete Laugh-Out-Laugh Holiday Jokes for Kids by Rob Elliott. This book is filled with jokes for Halloween, Thanksgiving, and Christmas. If you want more jokes,  get his book!

Let’s get started!

Also, download our FREE Printable Holiday Card so your children can showcase their artwork to family and friends this Holiday Season!

  1. What do snowmen eat for Lunch?

    • Brrrr-itos
  2. What is a Christmas tree’s least favorite month of the year?

    • Sep-timber
  3. What did Frosty wear to the wedding?

    • His snowsuit
  4. Why was Santa dressed up?

    • He was going to the snowball
  5. Why do snowmen always change their minds?

    • Because they are flaky!
  6. What does Santa give Rudoph when he has bad breath?

    • Orna-mints
  7. Who bring Christmas presents to a shark?

    • Santa Jaws
  8. What did the gingerbread man do when he sprained his ankle?

    • He iced it.
  9. What do grumpy sheep say during the holidays?

    • “Baa, baa, humbug.”
  10. Why do elves go to school?

    • To learn the elf-abet
  11. Why did the math teacher get sick after Christmas dinner?

    • He had too much pi.
  12. What does an elf listen to on the radio?

    • wrap music
  13. How do snow spend their Christmas vacations?

    • Chilling out
  14. What does Santa give his reindeer for a stomach ache?

    • Elk-a-Seltzer
  15. Why didn’t the rope get any presents?

    • Because it was knotty
  16. What did Mrs. Claus say to Rudolph when he was grump?

    • “You need to lighten up!”
  17. What is something you can throw during the holidays but catch?

    • A Christmas Party
  18. Why was the cat afraid to climb the Christmas tree?

    • It was scared of the bark.
  19. Why did the baker give everybody free cookies for  Christmas?

    • Because he had a lot of dough!
  20. What is a skunk’s favorite Christmas song?

    • “Jungle Smells”

 

OUR KID FRIENDLY FAST & FUN STUDY TRICKS FOR BETTER GRADES: 9 FUN STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS IN LEARNING AND SCHOOL HAS $29 OFF THE ORIGINAL PRICE.

Our books are available on Amazon, “Teach Your Toddler to Read Through Play,” “Fun Easy Ways to Teach Your Toddler to Write, and “Teach Your Child About Money Through Play.

THE TEACH YOUR TODDLER TO READ THROUGH PLAY ONLINE COURSE HAS A $97 DISCOUNT.

Click here for the PAYMENT PLAN OPTION!

5 Reading Games/Activities For Kids

Infants Can Read?          baby smiling

Did you know that children show signs of reading as infants? Reading is all about discovering meaning and this is what your baby did  when they first responded to your smile. Sometimes discovering meaning can be lost with traditional ISOLATED learning methods such letter sounds and worksheets. Reading should follow the natural way that children learn which is through a variety of experiences and following their interests.

Following Your Child’s Interest

If children are offered reading material that follow their interests, then they will want to seek meaning from words. From this desire, they will learn word recognition and phonics skills. Children learn best from discoveries they make from exploring the world around them. They gather conclusions from their experimentations and creative play. For example, in water play, they learn about volume, capacity, and the properties of water as they pour it cup to cup.

What You Can Do As a Parent

Your job as the parent is to describe their play and provide them with language.  During water play, use descriptive words such as wet, splash, ripples, warm, and cool.  Then expose them to similar words by reading books dealing with water such Splish, Splash Ducky by Lucy Cousins or Spot Goes to the Swimming Pool by Eric Hill.  This is the beginnings of  you making connections with language and play. The games/activities provided below will  help you make more connections with words through creative play.

Want to know what Games/Activities, Tips, and Resources were used to get my 3-year-old son to read on a 3rd grade level? Access my e-book, Teach Your Toddler to Read through Play, here. 

Let’s Get Started!

Change the Story

Children should be provided opportunities to apply knowledge from books through imaginative play. Below is a way to stimulate your child’s ability to problem solve, sort information, and develop new ideas through creative-thinking questions. Below is how to do it…
  1. Read a story to your child.
  2. Ensure your child is familiar with the story.
    • You may have to read the story multiple times to your child.
  3. Have your child change the ending.
  4. They may communicate their version of the ending through the following…
    • Drawing a picture
    • Creating a sculpture with Playdoh or Clay
    • Creating a dance
    • Role playing with props
    • Simply telling the story
play doh

Clues from the Story

The following activity will develop your child’s listening skills. It is also great for reading comprehension and learning new vocabulary.
  1. Read a story to your child.
  2. Ensure your child is familiar with the story.
    • You may have to read the story multiple times to your child.
  3. Gather clues from the story you have read. Clues from the story can include…
    • Characters
    • Setting – where the story took place.
    • The conflict or problem in the story.
    • The story’s resolution
    • Basically anything in the story
  4. Let your child guess what you are thinking from the story with the clues you give them.
  5. Use descriptive words to describe your clue such as…
    • “I’m thinking of a humongous animal with a large trunk.”
    • Then let your child give you the answer which is elephant.
  6. Now let your child think of something and give you clues.
  7. Another variation of this game is to have your child get clues by asking you yes/no questions about a mystery item.
    • “Is it large?
    • “Does it make a loud noise”

Treasure Hunt   treasure hunt

This game is great for reading comprehension. It also helps your child learn how print and pictures carry meaning.
  1. Read a story to your child.
  2. Ensure your child is familiar with the story.
    • You may have to read the story multiple times to your child.
  3. Tell your child they are going to do a treasure hunt.
  4. Find one vocabulary word, item, or character from the story.
  5. If you have the item in your home, you may use it for the hunt.
  6. If you don’t have the item, you may draw a picture and briefly describe it on separate piece of paper.
  7. Hide the item in your home.
  8. Leave a series of notes or pictures to help your child find the item.
    • For example, write “Go to the dining room table” or draw a picture of the  dining room table.
    • On the dining room table, have another note ready stating, “Go to your bedroom” or draw the child’s bedroom.
  9. Your child will continue finding and following instructions on notes or drawings until he/she locates the item from the story.
  10. Once your child has found the item, ask them to identify the item and how it fits in the story.

Charades

You will need more than one child for this game. This game is great for reading comprehension and promotes in-depth learning. In-depth learning is when you learn about something in various ways. Charades will allow your child to learn words through physical activities, reading, and application (identifying where it fits in the story)
  1. Read a story to your child.
  2. Ensure your child is familiar with the story.
    • You may have to read it multiple times to your child.
  3. Write vocabulary words or characters from the story on index cards or paper.
  4. Players will take turns picking these cards from a plastic bag and acting them out.
  5. The other players will guess the word.
  6. Once the word is identified, then have the child identify where the word fits in the story.
  7. Another variation of this game is to have the player draw a picture of the word while the other players guess the word.

Spy a Word

  1. Read a story to your child.
  2. Ensure your child is familiar with the story.
    • You may have to read it multiple times to your child.
  3. Omit a word and let your child fill in the blanks.
  4. Let’s say you read a story where a mouse is trying to find cheese.
  5. You say “In the story, the mouse is trying to find……
  6. Let your child say “cheese.”
  7. Keep stating the plot of the story and let your child fill in the blanks.
  8. Another variation of this game is to fill in the blanks with silly words and let your child correct you.
  9. You state  “In the story, the mouse is trying to find a cat to eat him.
  10. Let your child correct you with the word “cheese.”
black father reading to son Have Fun Reading and Playing! OUR KID FRIENDLY FAST & FUN STUDY TRICKS FOR BETTER GRADES: 9 FUN STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS IN LEARNING AND SCHOOL HAS $29 OFF THE ORIGINAL PRICE. Our books are available on Amazon, “Teach Your Toddler to Read Through Play,” “Fun Easy Ways to Teach Your Toddler to Write, and “Teach Your Child About Money Through Play.THE TEACH YOUR TODDLER TO READ THROUGH PLAY ONLINE COURSE HAS A $97 DISCOUNT. Click here for the PAYMENT PLAN OPTION!