Magic Kitchen Balloon Science Experiment

Did you know that science experiments can make children better readers? The book, The Three R’s by Ruth Beechick, which is about early childhood learning supports this fact.

In this book she talks about an experiment where some kindergartners in a school district received extensive instructions in reading while the others spent the same amount of time learning science.

The kids that learned science melted ice, observed thermometers in hot and cold places, played with magnets, grew plants and learned about animal life. Books and pictures were available for these children but no formal lessons in reading were held.

The school district learned that by the third grade the “science” children were far ahead of the “reading” children in their reading score. The reason is their vocabulary and thinking skills were much more advanced. They could read on more topics and understand higher levels of material. The playful, hands-on activities the “science” children did taught them analytical and problem solving skills and how to make connections in what they were learning.

This is why I think EXPOSING KIDS TO NEW WORDS AND READING THROUGH PLAY IS A GREAT CONCEPT.

So let’s talk about our exciting science experiment!

Today we will…

Blow Up A Balloon Without Blowing At All!

To incorporate literacy in this experiment, help your children read the Materials, Method, and Why it Works headings in this post. As kids are reading these sections, have them do the action. Children can use the pictures to help them read the words. If your children can read independently allow them to do so.

How to incorporate literacy in this experiment…

  1. Read the Materials and Method sections.
  2. Re-read the Materials section as you get the supplies.
  3. Re-read the Method section as you do the steps.

Let’s get started!

Materials:

  • Vinegar
  • Teaspoon of Baking Soda
  • 1 Balloon
  • Empty Water Bottle
  • 1 Funnel
  • Spoon
  • Safety goggles (we didn’t have safety goggles so we used sunglasses)

Method:

  • Put on your safety goggles (or sunglasses).
  • Pour some vinegar into the water bottle
    • Vinegar should fill 25% of the water bottle.
  • Pour baking soda into the balloon.
    • Stretch the balloon over the funnel’s neck.
    • Take the teaspoon of baking soda and put it in the funnel.
    • Ensure the baking soda reaches the inside of the balloon.
Balloon stretched over the funnel’s neck.
My son is looking for the teaspoon to measure the baking soda.

The baking soda is in the funnel. It goes down the funnel into the balloon.

  • Stretch the balloon over the water bottle’s neck.
It is hard to see but there is vinegar in the water bottle. The balloon has baking soda in it.
  • Pick up the balloon and empty out the baking soda into the water bottle.
    • AFTER THE BAKING SODA GOES INTO BOTTLE, PLEASE BACK UP IN CASE THE BALLOON POPS.
    • The balloon popped when we did the experiment for the first time.
    • Safety goggles will protect your eyes in case the balloon pops.
  • Stand back and watch the balloon BLOW UP!

Below is a video of my son and I doing the experiment!

Why it works?

  • As the baking soda mixes with the vinegar, it creates bubbles of carbon dioxide gas that escapes into the balloon.
  • This makes the balloon blow up by itself.
  • If the mixture creates a lot of gas, then the balloon will get so big until it pops!

Have fun experimenting!

Resources:

Easy Art Fun Do-It-Yourself Crafts for Beginning Readers by Jill Frankel Hauser

Crafty Science by Jane Bull


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