170 Children’s Books with Black Characters

170 children's books with black characters

I love reading good children’s books with my three-year-son and recommending them to my friends who are mothers. When I recently sent them a book recommendation, one mom requested books with black characters.

This mom and I have black children and it is important for us to have books with characters that resemble them. It helps our children make a connection with the characters, plot, and setting.

Suddenly I started creating a list of books we have read with black characters. At first, I thought the list would consist of 25 books. However, as I began writing, it went from 25, 50, 75, 100, 125, 150, and then finally to 170 books!

Some of these books I have read to my son, and then some he read independently.

 

Read these books below and make them come alive to your children.

Let’s get started! 

*This post contains affiliate links, which means I receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you, if you make a purchase using the links.

1. Max Goes to the Barber by Adria F. Klein/Mernie Gallagher-Cole

  • This book explores a boy’s visit to the barber as he gets his hair cut and combed.

2. Max Goes to the Dentist by Adria F. Klein/Mernie Gallagher-Cole

  •  This book describes what a trip to the dentist entails. As a result, Max learns how to take proper care of this teeth.

3. Max Goes to School by Adria F. Klein/Mernie Gallagher-Cole

  • Learn about Max’s day at school, as he listens to a story, draws a picture, plays on the playground, and eats lunch.

4. Max Goes to the Library by Adria F. Klein/ Mernie Gallagher-Cole

  • Max, who loves to read, discovers all the services available to him during a visit to the library.

5. Max Goes to the Zoo by Adria Klein/Mernie Gallagher-Cole

  • Max and his friend, Lily, spend a day exploring the zoo. Read this book and find out what animals they see.

6. Lola at the Library by Anna McQuinn/Rosaline Beardshaw

  • Lola and her mom go to the library weekly. Find out what fun she has and the friends she meets.

7. The Snowy Day by Erza Jack Keats

  • This work reveals the adventures of a little boy in the city on a very snowy day.

8. Peter’s Chair by Erza Jack Keats

  • Learn how Peter’s world is turned upside down with the arrival of a new baby sister.

9. Goggles by Erza Jack Keats

  • Peter and his friend find motorcycle goggles. Find out what happens when the older boys from the neighborhood want the goggles.

10. Pet Show by Erza Jack Keats

  • Archie faces a dilemma  when he wants to enter a pet show but his cat runs away. Read how he uses fast thinking to solve his problem.

11. Whistle for Willie by Erza Jack Keats

  • Learn about Peter, on a hot summer day, who wants to whistle for his dog, Willie.

12. Ten, Nine, Eight by Molly Bang

  • This book is about bedtime fun and a countdown to pleasant dreams.

13. Whose Toes are Those by Jabari Asim/LeUyen Pham

  • Kids will enjoy this interactive book that celebrates the game, This Little Piggy.

14. I Am So Brave by Stephen Krensky/Sara Gillingham

  • Discover how this boy grows out of toddlerhood with courage and success!

15. I Know A lot by Stephen Krensky/Sara Gillingham

  • Discover how this girl grows out of toddlerhood with new knowledge to share!

16. Shades of Black: A Celebration of our Children by Sandra L. Pinkney/Miles Pinkney

  • This book explores the various skin tones, hair texture, and eye color of black children.

17. Shanna’s Teacher Show by Jean Marzollo/Shane W. Evans

  • Today Shanna is playing a teacher who knows how to make learning fun! She also teaches kids creativity and how to problem solve.

18. God Bless the Child by Billie Holiday/Arthur Herzog, Jr.

  • This book is based off the song by Billie Holiday, “God Bless the Child.”

19. Harper Counts Her Blessings by Kristi Guillory Reid/Jerry Craft

  • This book shows children the importance of taking the time each day as a family to reflect upon their blessings and to thank God.

20. Peek a Boo Morning by Rachel Isadora

  • A toddler plays a game of peekaboo with her family.
My son reading a book.

21. Peek a Boo Bedtime by Rachel Isadora

  • A fun-loving toddler delights in entertaining his family, friends, and puppy with his special game throughout the day.

22. Green Pants by Kenneth Kraegel

  • Jameson only wears green pants. When he wears green pants, he can do anything. If he wants to be in his cousin’s wedding, he is required to wear a tuxedo, with black pants. What will he do?

23. Brown Boy Brown Boy What Can you Be by Ameshia Arthur

  • Read about Matthew as he considers all the things he can accomplish and the careers he can do.

24. Dad Who Will I Be? by G. Todd Taylor/Jorge Hernandez

  • This book inspires, encourages, and educates young readers to be great by introducing them to heroes of color from a number of different professions.

25. Full Full Full of Love by Trish Cooke/Paul Howard

  • For the youngest member of an extended family, Sunday dinner
    at Grannie’s can be full of hugs and kisses, tasty dishes, happy faces, and love. This book has a special focus on the bond between little Jay Jay and his grannie.

26. I Look Up to Michelle Obama by Anna Membrino/Fatti Burke

  • This board book reveals Michelle Obama’s excellent qualities with text designed to share and read aloud.

27. Mary had a Little Glam by Tammi Sauer/Vanessa Brantley-Newton

  • This little Mary has swag! In this fun take on Mother Goose, fashionable Mary helps childhood’s characters go glam.

28. Dream Big, Little One by Vashi Harrison

  • This book showcases black women who changed the world.

29. Marvelous Me: Inside and Out by Lisa Bullard/Brandon Reibeling

  • There is no one else quite like Alex as he is one of a kind. This book will encourage children to embrace the things that make them unique.

30. Baby Dance by Ann Taylor/Majorie van Heerden

  • For the babies who respond to music and movement, this work provides a playful poem that has a father and child dancing.

31. Milo’s Museum by Zetta Elliott/Purple Wong

  • Milo is excited about her class trip to the museum.  However, Milo realizes that the people from her community are missing from the museum. Milo takes matters into her own hands and opens her own museum!

32. Please, Baby, Please by Spike Lee/Tonya Lewis Lee

  • This book explores the thrills of bringing up a baby! Families everywhere will want to share in these precious moments again and again.

33. Leo Loves Baby Time by Anna McQuinn/Ruth Hearson

  • On Wednesdays, Leo and his mom go to Baby Time, where he plays peek-a-boo, sings, and meets new friends.

34. Leo Can Swim by Anna McQuinn/Ruth Hearson

  • Leo and Daddy go to swim class where they kick, bounce, and dive like little fish.

35. Pretty Brown Face by Andrea Davis Pinkney/Brian Pinkney

  •  Join the fun as a baby boy discovers the unique features on his face. This board book also celebrates the loving closeness of an African American family.

36. I Love My Hair by Natasha Anatasia Tarpley/E.B. Lewis

  • Keyana discovers the beauty and magic of her special hair, encouraging black children to be proud of their heritage and to enhance their self-confidence.

37. Afro-Bets 1,2,3 by Cheryl Willis Hudson

  • Children will enjoy learning numbers 1 through 10 as the Afro-Bets take turns stretching and bending into numbers.

38. Afro-Bets ABC Book by Cheryl Willis Hudson

  • The Afro-Bets ABC book uniquely presents letters A through Z for young children to discover with the fun-filled, captivating Afro-Bets Kids.

39. Afro-Bets Book of Colors by Margery Brown/Culverson Blair

  • Learn the colors in a fun way with the Afro-Bets Kids.

40. Afro-Bets Book of Shapes by Margery Brown/Culverson Blair

  • Learn the shapes in a fun way with the Afro-Bets Kids.

41. Riley Can be Anything by Mrs. Davina Hamilton/Elena Reinoso

  • This inspiring rhyming story follows Riley as he discovers some of the wonderful things he can do when he grows up.

42. Chocolate Me by Taye Diggs/Shane W. Evans

  • The boy in this book is teased for looking different than the other kids. He tells his mother he wishes he could be more like everyone else. She helps him to see how beautiful he is.

43. Mixed Me by Taye Diggs/Shane W. Evans

  • This story is about a boy named Mike who has to answer many questions about being mixed. Learn about the day in the life of a mixed-race child with this book.

44. I Am Mixed by Garcelle Beauvais/Sebastian A. Jones

  • This book follows twins, Jay and Nia, who explore what it is like to be of mixed ancestry, proving that a child is more than the sum of their parents.

45. I Love you More Than by Taye Diggs/Shane W. Evans

  • This story is perfect for families who are separated, whatever the circumstances. Its message of love highlights the bond between parent and child in ways that little ones will understand.

46. Lullaby (For a Black Mother) by Langston Hughes/Sean Qualls

  • The poet, Langston Hughes, celebrates the love between an African American mother and her baby.

47. Ada Twist Scientist by Andrea Beaty/David Roberts

  • Ada learns the value of thinking her way through problems and continuing to stay curious.

48. When God Made You by Matthew Paul Turner/David Catrow

  • This book inspires young readers to learn about their own special gifts and how they fit into God’s divine plan.

49. Monster Trouble by Lane Fredrickson/Michael Robertson

  • Nothing frightens Winifred Schnitzel, but she needs her sleep. The neighborhood monsters WON’T let her be! What’s a girl to do? (Hint: Monsters HATE kisses!)

50. Even Superheroes Have Bad Days by Shelly Becker/Eda Kaban

  • This energetic picture book has plenty of fun ideas to help kids cope when they’re feeling overwhelmed.

51. Hank’s Big Day by Evan Kuhlman/Chuck Groenink

  • Hank is a pill bug with a busy life.  His daily routine involves nibbling a dead leaf, climbing up a long stick, avoiding a skateboarder, and playing pretend with his best friend, a human girl named Amelia.

52. Not Norman: A Goldfish Story by Kelly Bennett/Noah Z. Jones

  • Norman the goldfish isn’t what this little boy had in mind. He wanted a different kind of pet. When he tries to trade Norman for a “good pet,” things don’t go as he planned.

53. Max and the Tag-Along Moon by Floyd Cooper

  • Grandpa promises Max that the moon at his house is the same moon that will follow him all the way home. When the sky darkens and the moon disappears behind the clouds, he worries that it didn’t follow him home after all.

54. These Hands by Margaret Mason/Floyd Cooper

  • Joseph learns that people joined their hands to fight discrimination so that one day, their hands could do anything in this world.

55. Can I Touch Your Hair?: Poems of Race, Mistakes, and Friendship by Irene Latham/Charles Waters

  • Two poets, one white and one black, explore race and childhood in this  collection tailored to provoke thought and conversation.

56. I Am Loved by Nikki Giovanni/Ashley Bryan

  • Nikki Giovanni’s collection of poems celebrates the importance of a child feeling loved.

57. The Word Collector by Peter Reynolds

  • Jerome discovers the magic and power of words all around him.

58. Max Speed by Stephen Shaskan

  • Max, a tiny speed racer, is off on the adventure of a lifetime in this  picture book. It proves that all you need for a big adventure is a little imagination.

59. Goodnight Lab: a Scientific Parody by Chris Ferrie

  • This book pokes fun at the clutter and chaos of a science lab life. Kids can laugh and learn at the same time.

60 . Mae Among the Stars by Roda Ahmed/Stasia Burrington

  • This book is about Little Mae’s curiosity, intelligence, and determination, matched with her parents’ encouraging words. This paved the way for her incredible success at NASA as the first African American woman to travel in space.

61. Hidden Figures: The True Story of Four Black Women and the Space Race by Margot Lee Shetterly/Laura Freeman

  • This book is based on the New York Times bestselling book and the Academy Award–nominated movie. Author Margot Lee Shetterly and illustrator Laura Freeman bring to you the inspiring true story of four black women who helped NASA launch men into space.

62. Have You Thanked an Inventor Today? by Patricia McLaurin & Dian Wang

  • This is a book of African-American inventor contributions to the American landscape. This book was written to appeal to African-American youth, inspiring creative thought and innovation.

63. I Want to Be a Police Officer by Laura Driscoll/Cantalina Echeverri

  • This story teaches readers about police officers who protect people, investigate crimes, and even work with trained dogs.

64. I Want to be a Doctor by Laura Driscoll/Echeverri

  • This story teaches readers about Doctors, who help sick people feel better. When little brother Jack hurts his foot, the family gets to meet all kinds of doctors.

65. The Penny Pot by Stuart Murphy/Lynn Cravath

  • This book shows kids how to count and use money. It also addresses the concept of saving to get what you want.

66. Elevator Magic by Stuart Murphy/G. Brian Karas

  • This book teaches kids subtraction. Ben sees crazy things every time the door opens to the elevator. Ride along as he subtracts his way down to the lobby, and decide for yourself if it’s elevator magic.

67. Early Sunday Morning by Denene Millner/Vanessa Brantley-Newton

  •  June is a girl who collects helpful pieces of advice on how to be less nervous about her big solo.

68. A Wild Cowboy by Dana Kessimakis Smith/Laura Freeman

  • When a little boy gets to spend the day at Grandma’s house, he’s really preparing to go on the cowboy ride of his dreams. With his imagination working, he and his partner ride their horses  to meet their ranch hand.

69. Beautiful Blackbird by Ashley Bryan

  • Blackbird was voted the most beautiful bird in the forest. The other birds, who were colored red, yellow, blue, and green, begged Blackbird to paint their feathers with a touch of black so they could be beautiful too. Black-bird warns them that true beauty comes from within, however the other birds persist.

70. Take a Picture of Me, James Van Der Zee by Andrea Loney/Keith Mallett

  • This is a story of James  who opened his own portrait studio in Harlem. He took photographs of legendary figures of the Harlem Renaissance–politicians such as Marcus Garvey, performers including Florence Mills, Bill -Bojangles- Robinson, and Mamie Smith–and ordinary folks in the neighborhood too.

71. Who is Barack Obama? by Roberta Edwards/Who HQ

  • This is a biography about Barack Obama who made history as our first African-American President. Children will learn his life story and become big dreamers.

72. The Seven Days of Kwanzaa by Ella Grier/John William Ward

  • This is a story that celebrates and honors the richness of African-American culture and traditions. It includes lyrics to songs and four simple recipes to make a holiday feast.

73. Hey Black Child by Useni Eugene Perkins/Bryan Collier

  • This work consists of empowering poems that celebrate black children and  inspires young people to dream big and achieve their goals.

74. Pretend You’re a Cat by Jean Marzollo/Jerry Pinkney

  • This interactive book consists of rhyming verses asking the reader to purr like a cat, scratch like a dog, leap like a squirrel, and bark like a seal.

75. Angels Watching Over Me by Julia Durango/Elisa Kleven

  • This book reassures young children that someone is watching over their well-being.

76. Crown: An Ode to the Fresh Cut by Derrick Barnes/Gordon C. James

  • The reader will understand the feelings of a young African American boy as he gets a “fresh cut. ”  This trip to the barbershop changes the way he feels about the world and in turn how the world perceives him. This book is for older or mature children.

77. Little Red and the Very Hungry Lion by Alex T. Smith

  • Little Red is on her way to visit Auntie Rosie with a basket of goodies and  medicine. Along the way she meets the Very Hungry Lion, who wants to gobble her up. The Lion’s plan doesn’t work out the way he wanted.

78. Penny and the Magic Puff Balls by Alonda Williams/Tyrus Goshay

  • Penny wanted to wear her hair “down” like all of the other girls in her class. She wondered why her friends had long straight hair and she did not.  Penny’s mom assured her that her hair is perfect. Penny learns through a series of fun adventures, that wonderful and magical things happen when she wears her puffballs.

79. I’m A Pretty Little Black Girl by Betty Bynum

  • Mia finds that pretty is within herself and her friends, and being pretty is way beyond what the mirror shows.

80. I Am Enough by Grace Byers/Kenturah A. Bobo

  • This book encourages girls to love who they are, respect others, and be kind to one another.

81. This Little Light of Mine by Public Domain/E.B. Lewis

  • “This Little Light of Mine” is an African-American spiritual song dating back to the days of slavery. The song is included in this book so that you can learn to play and sing.

82. World of Reading: Black Panther: This is Black Panther (Level 1) by Alexandra C. West/Marvel Press Artist

  • Kids will learn how T’Challa, an African Prince, protects his nation and becomes the Super Hero Black Panther.

83. Marvel’s Black Panther: Meet Black Panther (Level 2) by R.R. Busse

  • T’Challa, the Black Panther and warrior King of Wakanda, teams up with elite members of the Dora Milaje–Wakanda’s special forces–and C.I.A. agent Everett K. Ross to defend his kingdom.

84. Black Panther Little Golden Book by Frank Berrios/Patrick Spaziante

  • Children, ages 2-5, will love this action-packed Little Golden Book as they learn about the Black Panther–from his Wakandan origins to his powers as well as his friends and enemies.

85. Caribbean Dream by Rachel Isadora

  •  Children will learn about a place where they can run, splash, and sing, on an island in the West Indies. Rachel Isadora’s book celebrates the things that make the Caribbean a very special home.

86. Marvelous Cornelius: Hurricane Katrina and the Spirit of New Orleans by Phil Bildner/John Parra

  • This is an inspiring story of a humble man and the heroic difference he made in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

87. Jabari Jumps by Gaia Cornwall

  • Jabari is definitely ready to jump off the diving board. He has finished his swimming lessons and passed his swim test. He’s a great jumper, so he’s not scared at all. Find out why he still needs his father for encouragement.

88. Happy in Our Skin by Fran Manushkin/Lauren Tobia

  • This is a story about the human family and how wonderful it is to be just who you are.

89. Lottie Paris and the Best Place by Angela Johnson/Scott Fischer

  • Lottie Paris has a favorite place. The library! She loves to go there and read about space. She knows there are rules at the library, but sometimes they are difficult to follow.

90. Lottie Paris Lives Here by Angela Johnson/Scott Fischer

  • Lottie Paris loves to dress up, play on the slide, and prefers to eat cookies instead of vegetables. She has a great imagination and sees the possibilities in the simplest pleasures.

91. Seeing Into Tomorrow Haiku by Nina Crews/Dr. Richard Wright

  • A selection of haiku poems by the acclaimed 20th-century African-American writer, Dr. Richard Wright. This work reflects the timeless realities of African-American youth.

92. I Can be Anything!  Don’t Tell Me I Can’t by Diane Dillon

  • Zoe embraces all the wonders of our world and its possibilities. “I can be anything I want to be!” she tells us, presenting herself in a range of careers. “But what if you fail?” asks a voice of doubt that attempts to undermine her confidence.

93. Billy Boo is Stuck in Goo by Jennifer Hamburg/Ross Burach

  • Billy Boo is stuck in goo. When others try to rescue him, they get stuck as well. How will they get out of this situation?

94. My Name is Judah by Pamela Denise Mack

  • This is a story about a little boy named Judah, who meets three new friends. He shares the meaning of his name which is Praise. Judah and his new friends, Suzie, Jorge, and Tom share a fun-filled day together.

95. It’s Great Being a Dad by Dan Bar-el/Gina Perry

  • Mythical characters are roaming around a magical land having a great time. However, Bigfoot gets his foot stuck in a tree trunk and Unicorn gets her horn impaled on a table and Robot’s saw-arm gets rusted into position.  Dad is there to fix things–even when a Sneaky Flying Alligator Pirate steals the Fairy Queen Ballerina Doctor’s wand.

96. The Doctor with an Eye for Eyes: The Story of Dr. Patricia Bath by Julia Finley Mosca/Daniel Rieley

  • Patricia Bath made it her mission to become a doctor. When obstacles like racism, poverty, and sexism threatened this goal, she persevered and created a game-changing treatment for blindness!

97. Do Not Bring Your Dragon to the Library by Julie Gassman/Andy Elkerton

  • Have you ever thought about bringing your dragon to the library? Don’t do it! You might have the best intentions, but that dragon will cause nothing but trouble.  This book has diverse characters and discusses library etiquette in a humorous way.

98. Phoebe Sounds it Out by Julie Zwillich/Denise Holmes

  • Meet Phoebe whose name doesn’t look quite like it sounds. At school, her classmates practice writing their names, but she struggles. Her teacher tells her to “just sound it out.” Phoebe doubts herself and procrastinates before resolving to try. Find out what she does to overcome her problem.

99. Not ‘Til Tomorrow, Phoebe by Julie Zwillich/Denise Holmes

  • Phoebe’s day is full of tomorrows: Mama says they can make pancakes, her teacher announces musicians will visit the class, and Phoebe will get ice cream after her haircut—but none of it ’til tomorrow. Phoebe feels frustrated and impatient. Why can’t these good things happen right now?

100. The Colors of Us by Karen Katz

  • Seven-year-old Lena is going to paint a picture of herself. She wants to use brown paint for her skin. When she and her mother take a walk through the neighborhood, Lena learns that brown comes in many different shades.

101. Manners with a Library Book by Amanda Doering Tourville/Chris Lensch

  • Should you let your baby sister play with a library book? This book shows how good manners can help everyone enjoy library books.

102. The Thing Lou Couldn’t Do by Ashley Spires

  • Lou and her friends are BRAVE adventurers. They run faster than airplanes, build mighty fortresses and rescue wild animals. But Lou has never climbed a tree before, and she’s sure she can’t do it. So she tries to convince her friends to play a “not-up-a-tree” game.

103. I like Myself by Karen Beaumont/David Catrow

  • This book encourages kids to appreciate everything about themselves—inside and out. Here’s a little girl who knows what really matters.

104. For You are a Kenyan Child by Kelly Cunnane/Ana Juan

  • Imagine you live in a small Kenyan village, where the sun rises over tall trees filled with doves. You wake to the sound of a rooster’s crow and rather than kicking a soccer ball across a field, you kick a homemade ball of rags. Despite this, things aren’t that different for a Kenyan child than they would be for an American kid.

105. If You Were a Kid Docking at the International Space Station by John Gregory/Jason Raish

  • Tim and Lucy, whose cousin Marie, is getting ready to blast off into space finds out how people travel to and from the space station. They also learn what life is like for astronauts in space, why space exploration is important, and much more.

106. Beautiful Moon: A Child’s Prayer by Tonya Bolden/Eric Velasquez

  • A young boy wakes and has forgotten to say his prayers. Outside his window, a beautiful moon lights the city around him. As the moon slowly makes its way across the heavens, the boy offers a simple prayer for the homeless, the hungry, and others.

107. The Girl With a Mind for Math: The Story of Taye Monatgue by Julia Finley Mosca/Daniel Rieley

  • After touring a German submarine in the early 1940s, young Raye wanted to become an engineer. However, sexism and racial inequality would challenge that dream.  She kept her greatest career accomplishment a secret for decades. Through it all, the gifted mathematician persisted.

108. Little Man Little Man: A Story of Childhood by James Baldwin/Nicholas Boggs

  • James Baldwin’s only children’s book, Little Man, Little Man, celebrates and explores the challenges and joys of black childhood.

109. We Love You Rosie by Cynthia Rylant/Linda Davick

  • Rosie is a very busy little dog. Sometimes she’s good, and sometimes she’s bad. Sometimes she wants to go out, and other times she wants to stay in. But no matter what, Rosie’s family loves her!

110. 3 x 4: Toon Level 1 (Toon Easy-to-read Comics, Level 1) by Ivan Brunetti

  • This book features a black male teacher who gave his class an assignment to draw sets of twelve. He encourages them to use their imagination to come up with creative solutions. Young readers will delight in the counting game while learning the basics of multiplication.

111. Kick it Mo (Mo Jackson) by David Adler/Sam Ricks

  • The soccer season is starting, and Mo has been working hard on his kicking skills. When he gets on the field on game day, it seems like all he gets to do is run back and forth. Will Mo ever get the chance to show his team what he can do?

112. Don’t Throw It To Mo! (Mo Jackson) by David Adler/Sam Ricks

  • Mo is the youngest kid on the Robins, his football team. His classmates don’t mind, but the kids on their rival team tease him for being a “butterfinger” who’s too tiny to catch the ball. How will Mo handle this situation?

113. Pass the Ball, Mo! (Mo Jackson) by David Adler/Sam Ricks

  • Mo loves basketball. He’s determined to learn how to pass, but as the shortest member of the team, he can’t seem to launch the ball high enough. Can Mo learn to pass in time to help his team win the big game?

114. Get a Hit, Mo! by David Adler/Sam Ricks

  • Baseball season has arrived and Mo is all set to play with his team, the Lions. Mo always bats last, and he always plays right field—and no balls ever come to right field. Will Mo ever get his chance to help the Lions win?

115. Young, Gifted and Black: Meet 52 Black Heroes from Past and Present by Jamie Wilson/Andrea Pippins

  • Children will meet 52 icons of color from the past and present in this celebration of inspirational achievement. This is a collection of stories about change makers to encourage, inspire and empower the next generation of youth.

116. Snow Day! by Candice Ransom/Erika Meza

  • Two siblings have woken up to snowy weather! Read along as they engage in their favorite winter activities with their neighborhood friends on their day off from school.

117. I am Human A Book of Empathy by Susan Verde/ Peter H. Reynolds

  • I Am Human shows that it’s okay to make mistakes while also emphasizing the power of good choices. This picture book is a celebration of empathy and encourages children to see themselves as part of one big imperfect family.

118. Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Black Boy by Tony Medina/Javaka Steptoe

  • Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Black Boy offers a fresh perspective of young men of color by depicting thirteen views of everyday life: young boys dressed in their Sunday best, running to catch a bus, and growing up to be teachers, and much more.

119. Kele’s Secret by Tolowa M. Mollel/Catherine Stock

  • A young Tanzanian boy named Yoanes overcomes his fear of the scariest place on his grandparents’ farm, the spooky shed, when he follows Kele, his grandmother’s hen, to see where she lays her eggs.

120. You Can Do It by Tony Dungy/Amy June Bates

  • Tony Dungy’s little brother, Linden, is a third grader who is having a bad day at school. Linden is the youngest of the Dungy family and the least motivated because he hasn’t found “it.” In a family where everyone seems to have found their special talent, all Linden knows is that he wants to make people happy.

121. We are Brothers by Yves Nadon/Jean Claverie

  • Every summer, two brothers swim to the rock, and one jumps off. But this summer, it’s time for both of them to take the leap. In this story, a younger brother discovers newfound strength and courage.

122. Thank You, Omu by Oge Mora

  • Everyone in the neighborhood loves Omu’s delicious stew! They follow their noses toward the scrumptious scent. And one by one, Omu offers a portion of her meal. Soon the pot is empty. Has she been so generous that she has nothing left for herself?

123. Two Problems for Sophia by Jim Averbeck/Yasmeen Ismail

  • Sophia quickly learns her new pet comes with two giraffe-sized problems. Learn what she does to solve these problems.

124. One Word from Sopha by Jim Averbeck/Yasmeen Ismail

  • Sophia tries various techniques to get the giraffe she always wanted. Find out if she is able to convince her Mom, Dad, Uncle, and Grand-mama.

125. Excellent Ed by Stacy McAnulty/Julia Sarcone-Roach

  • Everyone in the Ellis family is excellent–except Ed, the dog. Ed wonders if this is why he isn’t allowed to eat at the table or sit on the couch with the other children. He’s determined to find his own excellence.

126. Brave by Stacy McAnulty/Joanne Lew-Vriethoff

  • This book encourage kids to be brave in all the ways they can. This book will inspire kids to follow their hearts and to have courage, no matter the situation.

127. Goal by Mina Javaherbin/A.G. Goal

  • In a township in South Africa, Ajani and his friends have earned a brand-new, federation-size soccer ball. When a crew of bullies tries to steal their ball, find out if Ajani and his friends are able to beat them at their own game?

128. Me and Uncle Romie by Claire Hartfield/Jerome Lagarrigue

  • James can’t wait to get on board the train and go visit his uncle up north in New York City. He also  wishes he could take a little bit of home along with him. Will Uncle Romie, who’s a great artist, be able to help James?

129. Celebrate with ZaZa by Mylo Freeman

  • It’s Rosie’s birthday and Zaza is having a party for her. It’s time to celebrate!

130. Sleep Well, Siba and Saba by Nansubuga Nagadya Isdahl/Sandra Van Doorn

  •  Sisters, Siba and Saba, are always losing something. Sandals, slippers, sweaters— – you name it, they lose it. When the two sisters fall asleep each night, they dream about the things they have lost that day. Until, one night, their dreams begin to reveal something entirely unexpected….

131. Danitra Brown, Class Clown by Nikki Grimes/E.B. Lewis

  • Best friends, Zuri Jackson and Danitra Brown, respond very differently to the start of school. For Zuri, there are so many things to ponder — a new teacher who replaced the old one she liked so much, passing math, and worrying about her mother’s health. But for Danitra, the only real deal is being true to herself, having fun, and supporting Zuri in any way she can.

132. Meet Danitra Brown by Nikki Grimes/Floyd Cooper

  • This book introduces young readers to Danitra Brown and her best friend, Zuri Jackson.”

133. World of Reading: Doc McStuffins All Stuffed Up: Pre-level 1 by Disney Book Group/Catherina Happy

  • Donny’s teddy bear keeps making him sneeze! Teddy is sad and doesn’t know why Donny won’t play with him anymore, but Doc is on the case!

134. Doc McStuffins Out of the Box (Flap ‘n Tab) by Disney Book Group/Marcy Kelman

  • Little Jack, Doc’s jack-in-the-box, is having trouble popping out of his box. His father, Big Jack, asks Doc to take a look, but Little Jack is too scared to let Doc examine him! Through this format, children can play along with Doc, Little Jack, and the rest of the toys using die-cut tabs and lift-the-flaps for a unique, experience.

135. Doc McStuffins Little First Look and Find – PI Kids by Editors of Phoenix International Publications/

  • Kids can search 7 amazing scenes for Doc McStuffins characters and objects. Then, go to the back of the book for extra Look and Find challenges!

136. Doc McStuffins Pet Vet by Disney Book Group/Disney Storybook Art Team

  • Donny’s new toy dog, Fetchin’ Findo, stops doing what he does best: fetching! Can Doc, the vet, find out what’s wrong with the little pup? This story is based on a special Pet Vet episode and includes lots of fun stickers!

137. The Ring Bearer by Floyd Cooper

  • Jackson’s mother is getting married, and he gets to be the ring bearer. But Jackson is worried . . . What if he trips? Or walks too slowly? She’s supposed to be the flower girl, but Jackson’s not sure she’s taking her job as seriously as she should.

138. Tea Cakes for Tosh by Kelly Starling Lyons/E.B. Lewis

  • Tosh loves listening to Grandma Honey tell family stories.  This story celebrates the important bond between grandchild and grandparent and the stories that make a family strong.

139. Grace for President by Kelly DiPucchio/LeUyen Pham

  • When Grace’s teacher reveals that the United States has never had a female president, she decides to be the first. She immediately starts off her political career as a candidate in the school’s mock election!

140. I’m a Big Brother Now by Katura J. Hudson/Sylvia L. Walker

  •  This picture book explores the  excitement and pride of a young boy who takes on an important new role as a big brother.

141. The Quickest Kid in Clarksville by Pat Zietlow Miller/Frank Morrison

  • It’s the day before the big parade and Alta can only think about one thing: Wilma Rudolph, three-time Olympic gold medalist.  Alta is the quickest kid in Clarksville, Tennessee, just like Wilma once was. But what happens when a new girl with shiny new shoes comes along and challenges Alta to a race?

142. A Beach Tail by Karen P. Williams/Floyd Cooper

  • This is story about a father-son bond. A boy named Gregory is lost on the beach  after his dad warns “Don’t go in the water, and don’t leave Sandy.” This work reassures the young reader that there is hope even in Greg’s moment of worry at finding himself lost and alone.

143. Little Melba and Her Big Trombone by Katheryn Russell-Brown/Frank Morrison

  • At age seven, Melba fell in love with a big, shiny trombone, and soon taught herself to play the instrument. By the time she was a teenager, Melba’s extraordinary gift for music led her to the world of jazz. She joined a band led by trumpet player Gerald Wilson and toured the country. Overcoming obstacles of race and gender, Melba went on to become a famed trombone player and arranger.

144. Last Stop on Market Street by Matt de la Peña/Christian Robinson

  • Every Sunday after church, CJ and his grandma ride the bus across town. But today, CJ wonders why they don’t own a car like his friend Colby. Why doesn’t he have an iPod like the boys on the bus?  Each question is met with an encouraging answer from grandma, who helps him see the beauty in their routine and the world around them.

145. My Kicks: A Sneaker’s Story by Susan Verde/Katie Kath 

  • When a child finds that his toes have outgrown his favorite shoes, and they’ve gotten too dirty and smelly, his mom says it’s time for a new pair. Resistant to let go, the boy reminisces about all the good times he’s had with his favorite kicks on the city streets.

146. Don’t Touch My Hair by Sharee Miller

  • Wherever Aria goes, someone wants to touch her hair. However, Aria has had enough!

147. Radiant Child: The Story of Young Artist Jean Michel Basquiat by Javaka Steptoe

  • This is the story of Jean-Michel Basquiat and his unique, collage-style paintings that became famous in the 1980s.

148. What’s Special About Me, Mama? by Kristina Evans/Javaka Steptoe

  • This a great story about family, self-love and celebrating what makes one unique.

149. Knock, Knock: My Dad’s Dream for Me by Daniel Beaty/Bryan Collier

  • Every morning a boy awaits the sounds of his dad knocking on the door. But what happens when, one day, that “knock knock” doesn’t come? This powerful and inspiring book shows the love that an absent parent can leave behind, and the strength that children find in themselves as they grow up and follow their dreams.

150. When the Beat was Born: DJ Kool Here and the Creation of Hip Hop by Laban Carrick Hill/Theodore Taylor III

  • From his childhood in Jamaica to his youth in the Bronx, Laban Carrick Hill’s book tells how Kool Herc came to be a DJ. He invented music that would define a culture and transform the world.

151. Trombone Shorty by Troy Andrews/Bryan Collier

  • From the Tremé neighborhood in New Orleans, Troy “Trombone Shorty” was a prodigy,  leading his own band by age six. Today this Grammy-nominated artist headlines the legendary New Orleans Jazz Fest.

152. Grandma in Blue with a Red Hat by Scott Menchin/Harry Bliss

  • When a young boy learns about what makes art special, he realizes that these same characteristics are what makes his grandmother special, too. As a result, he finds the inspiration to create his own masterpiece that’s one of a kind.

153. Ron’s Big Mission by Rose Blue/Corinne Nadon

  • Nine-year-old Ron loves going to the library. Today, Ron is ready to take out books by himself, but in the segregated world of South Carolina in the 1950s, there is resistance. Children will learn how Ron desegregated his library through peaceful resistance.

154. Bippity Bop Barbershop by Natasha Anastasia Tarpley/E.B. Lewis

  •  Miles makes his first trip to the barbershop with his father. Like most little boys, he is afraid of the sharp scissors, the buzzing razor, and the prospect of picking a new hairstyle. But with the support of his dad, the barber, and the other men in the barbershop, Miles bravely sits through his first haircut.

155. Squeak, Rumble, Whomp! Whomp! Whomp!: A Sonic Adventure by Wynton Marsalis/Paul Rogers

  • World-renowned jazz musician and composer Wynton Marsalis and acclaimed illustrator Paul Rogers takes readers (and listeners) on a rollicking, clanging, clapping tour through the many sounds that fill a neighborhood.

156. The 5’o Clock Band by Troy Andrews/Bryan Collier

  • After letting his band down by missing rehearsal, Shorty has some serious questions about what it means to be a leader. He hits the streets of New Orleans to find some answers and soak up inspiration.

157. All Are Welcome by Alexandra Penfold/Suzanne Kaufman

  • Follow a group of children through a day in their school, where everyone is welcomed with open arms.  A school where students grow and learn from each other’s traditions

158. Ben Doesn’t Like to be Hugged by Zetta Elliott/Purple Wong

  • A little girl uses rhyming verse to describe the unique traits of her autistic friend. Benny likes trains and cupcakes without sprinkles, but he can also be fussy sometimes. The narrator doesn’t mind, however, because “true friends accept each other just the way they are.”

159. The Day you Begin by Jacqueline Woodson/Rafael Lopez

  • Jacqueline Woodson’s lyrical book reminds us that we all feel like outsiders sometimes-and how brave it is that we go forth anyway. Sometimes, when we reach out and begin to share our stories, others will be happy to meet us halfway.

160. Around Our Way on Neighbor’s Day by Tameka Fryer Brown/Charlotte Riley-Webb

  • Neighbors gather on a hot summer day for a block party: Kids play Double Dutch; men debate at the barber shop and play chess; mothers and aunts cook and friends dance.

161. The Joys of Being a Little Black Boy by Valerie Reynolds/Chris Turner

  • Roy is a boy who will take  your children on a journey of joy with some of the world’s most notable Black men who were all at one time young Black boys.

162. Love your Hair by Dr. Phoenyx Austin

  • This book takes girls on a  journey, lead by a super-cute, confident  girl named Phoenyx, who loves her hair and wants every beautiful brown skin girl to love their hair too!

163. I’m a Pretty Princess by Crystal Swain-Bates

  • Makayla is a pretty black princess who lives in a castle  far away. Although she has cute dresses, a sparkling tiara, and a shiny wand, she knows that being a princess isn’t just about her fancy things. She wants to be the best princess ever!

164. Look What Brown Can Do by T. Marie Harris/Neda Ivanova

  • Every Brown child who’s still dreaming about what to be when they grow up should read this book. It encourages them to dream big and provides inspiration.

165. Naturally Me by Crystal Swain-Bates

  • This book is designed to boost self-esteem and build confidence in children of all ages. It follows a freckle-faced girl and a gap-toothed boy throughout their day as they show the reader how they celebrate their appearance and feel comfortable in their own skin.

166. I am a  Brilliant Little Black Boy by Betty K. Bynum/Joshua B. Drummond

  • The book  is a self esteem builder for young boys of color! It is a book of poems and a must for your library.

167. Amazing Grace by Mary Hoffman

  • Grace loves stories. When she gets a chance to play a role in Peter Pan, she knows exactly who she wants to be. However she meets resistance from those in her class when she does not look the part.

168. Big Hair Don’t Care by Crystal Swain-Bates/Caroline Binch

  • Lola has bigger hair than the other kids at school. She is confident and  sings the praises of her big hair throughout this rhyming picture book.

169. Charlotte and the Quiet Place by Deborah Sosin/Sara Woolle

  • Charlotte likes quiet-time. However, wherever Charlotte goes, she is surrounded by noise. Where can Charlotte find a quiet place? Find out when you read this book.

170. This is the Rope by Jaqueline Woodson/James Ransome

  • This is the story of one family’s journey north during the Great Migration with a little girl in South Carolina who finds a rope under a tree one summer.  For three generations, that rope is passed down, used for everything from jump rope games to tying suitcases onto a car.

Don’t forget to sign up for our FREE course on How to Teach the Alphabet in a Fun Way!

Also, download our FREE Printable Holiday Card so your children can showcase their artwork to family and friends this Holiday Season!

10 Creative Ways Kids Can Serve Others

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10 KIDS SERVE OTHERS

What Kids can Learn from Serving Others?

Encouraging kids to serve others is a great way to teach citizenship. Citizens understand there is a world greater than themselves. They make it a better place to live through helping others.

How Kids Benefit from Serving Others?

Kids who are involved in community service tend to be more confident because they have periods where they can forget about themselves and focus on others.

When kids are constantly thinking about themselves, they tend to focus on their flaws. This is where low self-esteem is usually developed because they constantly compare themselves to others.

Other Benefits of Community Service?

Serving others opens your eyes to those who are less fortunate than yourself. Also it boosts a child’s self esteem when they can apply their talents and skills to the benefit of others.

Children, as young as three years old, can learn about serving others. I have provided creative ways kids can help others below.

These service ideas are a collection of my personal experiences and recommendations from the book 77 Creative Ways Kids Can Serve by Sondra Clark. The author gives wonderful ideas for kids to assist people, animals, and the environment.

Let’s get started!

1. Collect Tennis Balls for Animals Shelters

Volunteers use the balls to interact with the animals

  • Contact local tennis clubs and ask if they have old balls they don’t need.
  • Ask tennis high school team coaches (if you have one) to announce that you are collecting balls  for animals in shelters.
  • Contact local parks and the recreation department for tennis balls.
  • Set up a drop-off time with animal shelters in your area.

tennis balls

2.  Prepare Birthday Bags for Children Living in Shelters 

It’s difficult for parents living in shelters to provide birthday parties for their children, but you can help.

3. Give Giggle Bags 

Bring joy to kids in the hospital with giggle bags.

birthday bags

4. Help Habitat for Humanity – Even if you are too young to build

 

Go to the Bottom of this Post and Get Access to Service and Gift Ideas from Real Moms. These Moms Share the Service Projects they have done with their Children.

5. Build a Rock Garden for a Senior 

6. Recycle at Home

  • Have a family meeting about ways to recycle.
  • Make a list of ideas like buying in bulk, use reusable containers for lunch, recycle old batteries at the local drugstore, and donating old clothes and furniture to charity.

recycling kid

7. Collect Coins for Those in Need

  • Provide for people who suffer from war, disease, poverty, or natural disasters a gift.
  • Go to the World Hope Website and find the gift catalog to choose a category such as education.
  • Have children collect coins for the need they would like to fill.
  • Call World Hope at 888-466-4673 and decide on the best way to deliver the money.

8. Create Senior Emergency Kits

9. Give Stuffed Animals to Offer Comfort

  • Firefighters and police officers frequently deal with kids going through tough situations and stuffed animals can help comfort these children.
  • Ask the police and fire stations if they would like stuffed animals.
  • Get stuffed animals by looking through your old toys and asking friends and relatives.
  • Ask local stores and office buildings for boxes to store animals.
  • Get ribbons to put around the stuffed animals’ necks.

stuffed animals

10. Pack Up Backpacks for Foster Kids

  • Help foster children by collecting backpacks and small suitcases to help them as they move to a new home.
  • Call your local Social Services or Child Protective Services Office to see if they could use backpacks.
  • Write letters to big stores like Wal-Mart or Target and ask them to donate back packs.
  • Ask local schools for backpacks in their lost and found boxes (that are not claimed).
  • Add a stuff animal in the bag if possible and deliver them to the Social Service agencies you contacted.

There are many ways kids can serve others. Please share your ideas in the comments below!

Happy Serving!

Don’t forget to sign up for our FREE course on How to Teach the Alphabet in a Fun Way!

Also, download our FREE Printable Holiday Card so your children can showcase their artwork to family and friends this Holiday Season!

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Best Toys for Young Boys Who Love to Build and Create

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The Best Toys for Boys Who Love to Build and Create

I love toys where children can use their imagination to build and create various objects. These types of toys exercise children’s brains by teaching early math skills and spatial awareness.

Below are imaginative toys that my son loves!

These toys occupy his time, provide fun educational opportunities, and bring out his inner engineering skills.

Let’s get started!

 

1. Magnetic Tiles

This is such a versatile STEM toy. My son has built letters, numbers, rocket ships, ferris wheels, towers, and cars with this toy. It has an instruction book to teach you how to build various objects. It is a great way for kids to use their creativity and engineering skills!

 

We built a rocket ship!

 

This is the letter B!

 

 

2. Learning Resources Gears

Gears are a great STEM toy that encourages kids to sort, group, count, construct, design and solve problems. My son has built homes and traps for his action figures with this toy. He also likes to build letters and numbers with the gears and widgets.

 

This is the letter T!

 

This is the letter P!

 

 

3. Legos DUPLO Town Truck & Tracked    Excavator

 

 

This is a great toy for children who love cars, trucks, and construction vehicles. Whenever we pass by a construction site, my son can name all the vehicles because of the books we have read and hands-on learning provided with these Legos. We have also created stories around the characters and vehicles to incorporate literacy. The package says it’s for children ages 2-5 but my 7-year-old cousin played with these and had a great time!

 

Multiples of 3 Lego City!

 

4. Sum Blox

 

This amazing toy taught my son how to add numbers 1-10. The “height of each number corresponds to its value.” For example, the “1-block” is the shortest number and the “10-block” is the tallest number. If you stack the 5-block on top of another 5-block, then they will equal the same height as the 10-block. Your child will learn that 5+5=10 by building creative structures such as walls, towers, bridges, etc. These blocks are a bit pricy but worth it, in my opinion.

5+5=10

 

He created a tower for his cars to go through!

 

5. Wikki Stix

 

My son and I love this simple yet fun toy. It keeps his attention through church services and in waiting rooms. Wikki Stix allows your child to create any object they want. They come in fun colors and require no mess. Boredom is NOT an issue when it comes to this toy.

wikki stix 2
Making a football

 

wikki stix
All done!

6. Flexi Rods

 

This is not exactly a toy but a hair product. I had unused flexi rods in my closet and gave them to my son to play. He played with these for 45 minutes! These rods twist and turn in to various shapes and objects. My son likes to create letters and numbers with them. My pediatrician said it strengthens his hands and is a great fidgeting toy.

 

He built these letters and put them on my computer.

 

7. Automoblox

 

I discovered these during a playdate. Your child can take these cars apart and rebuild them. It teaches kids to problem solve, color recognition, and coordination. When my son and I are racing the cars, sometimes I will take one apart and pretend he is a mechanic. His job is to rebuild the car so we can race again. He loves this game!

corban cars
Building the car!

 

corban car 2
Put the car together with success!

8. Steam Dinosaur Toys

This is a great toy for kids who like dinosaurs. Children can take the dinosaurs apart and rebuild them using kid-sized screwdrivers. It develops hand-eye coordination, puzzle solving skills, and patience. The dinosaurs have wheels on the bottom so you can slide them on the floor and race them.

Triceratops is being taken apart.

 

A race is about to happen between two dinosaurs!

 

9. Snap Circuits Jr.

This toy is recommended for children ages 8 and up; however, my three-year-son and I love building with it. This kit allows you and your child to build working models of a photo sensor, flashing light, and adjustable-volume sirens. Your child should have a basic knowledge of letters, numbers, and putting together puzzles in order to maneuver this toy.  Parental supervision is needed if your child is under 8. I advise you to learn how the circuits work then present it to your child.

 

Starting to build an electric light and switch.

 

Success!

 

He just built the flying saucer!

 

10. Bristol Blocks

My son received this toy for his birthday. He has built cars, airplanes, robots, letters and more with these blocks. They have built his hand strength and eye coordination. He has learned how various geometrical shapes can be connected to make a masterpiece. Our favorite activity is to build something and make up a story around what was created.

He likes building letters! Here is letter E!

Please tell us which toy your children like! All of these are a hit in our household!

Don’t forget to sign up for our FREE course on How to Teach the Alphabet in a Fun Way!

Also, download our FREE Printable Holiday Card so your children can showcase their artwork to family and friends this Holiday Season!

17 Children’s Books that Creatively Teach Kids Practical Skills

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17 book that teach life skills

I love reading!! I am the person that can spend all day in the library and bookstore soaking up knowledge from various books. When I became a mother, I hoped my son would share the same love of reading as I do.

It turns out that he does. However, I found ways to make books fun and interesting for him.

We often use books and hand-on activities to learn new skills within our household. I wanted to share with you 17 books that promoted fun interaction and  used creativity to teach my son a new concept.

*Click on the links and you will find a book review and  hands-on activities that we have done to supplement the books!

  1. Once Upon an Alphabet: Short Stories For All the Letters by Oliver Jeffers.

 

In this book, each letter has a word and short story related to it. The stories have various themes such as humor, gratefulness, and the art of thinking.  This book also helps children learn how to solve problems through its story telling.

 

  1. The Question Song by Kaethe Zemach

 

This book teaches kids to solve everyday problems. It addresses issues such as injuries and selfishness. My son found it interesting because it contains repetition, rhythm, and rhyming words.

 

  1. Emily’s First 100 Days of School by Rosemary Wells

 

This book is about a bunny named Emily who is starting school. Emily tells the reader about her first 100 days of school through short stories. This book  encouraged my son to create other stories with numbers. It helped him learn the numbers 1-100 through imaginative play.

 

  1. Big Words for Little Geniuses by Susan and James Patterson

 

This book is colorful and introduces kids to big words in alphabetical order. The first word was ARACHIBUTYROPHOBIA!!!! This word means a fear of peanut butter sticking to the top of your mouth. At first, I thought this book would be too advanced for my toddler. However, I decided to give it a try.

It became a great learning and bonding experience for my son and I. He learned how to pronounce all the words in the book. We also try to use the words as we are talking daily.

  1. The Great Dictionary Caper by Judy Sierra.

 

This is a fun, interactive, and flashy book about parts of speech, literacy, and language arts. This book addresses topics such as actions verbs, homophones, palindromes, onomatopoeias, contractions, etc. The Action verb page has various words like somersault, jump, glide and ricochet. Each word is written and drawn to portray their action.

 

  1. What’s On Your Plate? Exploring the World of Food by Whitney Stewart

 

This book highlights countries such as Mexico, Ethiopia, China, and Greece, and gives the reader information on their locations, foods frequently eaten, and recipes. The enticing food pictures in this book will make you hungry. My son gained an interest in learning about geography and connected with this book instantly. He learned that he eats similar foods to people all over the world.

 

  1. Meet Black Panther by R.R. Busse and This is Black Panther by Alexandra West

 

 

These two books introduced the characters and their roles for the Black Panther Comic Books. It also addressed themes such as good vs bad, courage, hard work, intelligence, instinct, loyalty, etc. One of the books identified vocabulary words and asked the reader to find them within the story. My son became excited when he saw the words in the story! I took it a step further and introduced my son to settings, geography, action verbs, and science.

 

  1. Your Fantastic Elastic Brain, Stretch It, Shape It by JoAnn Deak, PhD.

 

 

This book uses a diverse group of young characters to educate its reader on the powerful brain. A few concepts addressed in this book are parts of the brain and their functions. I was thrilled when we read the fact, “Making mistakes is one of the best ways your brain learns and grows.” Many children get frustrated when they are learning something new because mistakes are made, which is a part of the process. This book has taught me one way to handle my son’s frustration as he experiences the trial and error process.

 

  1.  I Want to Be a Doctor by Laura Driscoll

 

 

This story is about a boy who broke his leg by jumping off the top bunkbed. His family takes him to the emergency room, where his inquisitive older sister takes the reader on a journey to learn about the various doctors helping her brother.  Children will learn about specialized professions such as Radiologists, Orthopedists, Neonatologists and Dentists.

 

  1. Find Your Way in Space By Paul Boston

 

This book will take your young reader on a space mission using math and mapping skills. This book encourages children to solve a mystery. Mathematical concepts addressed in this book are counting, addition, shapes, identifying relationships between objects, colors, length, height, map coordinates, and telling time. The concepts are introduced through questions the reader must answer.

 

  1. The Berenstain Bears Learn About Strangers by Stan and Jan Berenstain

 

 

In this book, Brother Bear was cautious and wary of strangers. Sister Bear, similar to my son, was “friendly to a fault” and said hello to everyone. Brother intervened and told his sister to stop talking to strangers, but he couldn’t articulate why. This book explains to the young reader what to do around strangers.

 

  1. My Weird School Fast Facts – Space, Humans, and Farts by Dan Gutman

 

 

This book contains a lot of fun, humorous, and engaging information for kids. Your child will discover a love of science from reading this book! If you have a younger child, read these facts to them and see how amazed they become.

 

  1. When Miles Got Mad by Sam Kurtzman-Counter and Abbie Schiller

 

 

This is a great book that teaches kids to use their words to express their feelings. It also uses an image, a red monster, to represent anger and rage. The red monster makes a connection to what a child feels when angry feelings overwhelm them. This book addresses other themes such as empathy, self-control, keeping hands to self, and problem solving.

 

 

  1. How Does My Home Work? By Chris Butterworth

 

The author brings awareness to actions kids take every day in the home such as flipping on the light switch, accessing water from the faucet, and taking a drink from the refrigerator. He then uses the book to show children how these things happen. This book made my son more curious about how our home functions. He became more conscious of turning off the lights and water before he leaves a room! It also encourages a greater appreciation for your living space.

 

  1. Treasure Map by Stuart Murphy

 

 

This book is about a group of friends, the Elm Street Kids’ Club, following a treasure map to find a time capsule. The author shows the reader how to follow a map by giving clues that identify landmarks and directions. Other concepts presented in the book are decision-making skills, interpreting symbols, and scales. The author provides teachers and parents activities to supplement learning. Furthermore, he includes other books that address map reading skills.

 

16. Milo’s Museum by Zetta Elliott

 

This book’s plot was unexpected but refreshing. It is about a girl named Milo who takes a class field trip to the museum with her grandfather as a chaperone. As they were exploring the museum, Milo admired the art but something was missing. Children will witness a child taking the initiative to create an idea, plan and execute it. They will learn vocabulary words and will have access to a guide on how to create their own exhibit in the back of the book.

 

17. 3 x 4 a Toon Book by Ivan Brunetti

 

This comic book is about a teacher who gives his students a homework assignment of drawing 12 things but in sets.  He is addressing multiplication in the book. The story goes on to show the reader the process that each student executes to complete their homework assignment based on their interests. At the end, you will find tips for parents and teachers on How to Read Comics with Kids.

All of the books listed were fun and interesting to read. They opened my son’s mind  to learning something new and applying what he learned.

Let us know which book was your favorite and what activities you did to supplement the book.

Don’t forget to sign up for our FREE course on How to Teach the Alphabet in a Fun Way!

Also, download our FREE Printable Holiday Card so your children can showcase their artwork to family and friends this Holiday Season!

Happy Reading!

 

4 Fun and Thoughtful Holiday Activities for Kids

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4 holiday activities

It is a great time to do fun and thoughtful holiday activities with kids! I love this season because it is so full of life, joy, and love! It is also a time to celebrate the birth of Christ, spend time with family, and to give thanks for our presence here on earth. What I love most of all about the holidays is GIVING to others!!

Yes, the act of giving makes others feel good but it benefits the giver as well. It boosts “neurochemical drivers of happiness” and helps to normalize levels of serotonin which promotes feelings of comfort and well-being. I wanted my son to give and experience these feelings.

Therefore, we have done the following activities below to share and receive the pleasant feelings of holiday giving!

Paint Rocks and Give as Gifts

Last Christmas, when my son was two years old, I encouraged him to give gifts to family members. We chose to find big rocks in nature and paint them. We packaged them in colorful wrapping paper and gave them away.

My son was so excited that he could give gifts! He asked me 5 consecutive days before Christmas if it was time to give the rocks away. His rocks from last year are currently displayed in my family’s homes and he is proud. This is a simple yet fun project.

Materials Needed

  1. Place Newspaper on table for easy clean-up.
  2. Pour soap and water in plastic container to make soapy water.
  3. Clean rocks with soapy water and toothbrush.
  4. Empty soapy water and put clear water in container to rinse rocks.
  5. You can also run water over rocks to rinse them.
  6. Pour water in cup for cleaning paint brushes of previous color.
  7. Put napkins in paper plate #1 to dry paint brushes.
  8. Pour small sections of various color paints on paper plate # 2.
  9. Place rock on table with newspaper or magazine paper.
  10. Let your child be creative and paint the rock.

 

soapy water and rocks
Washing rocks in soapy water!

 

washing rocks
Rinsing the rocks in water!

 

paint set up
Setting up our supplies!

 

painting rocks
He likes mixing the paint.

 

rocks
Finished product!

 

Count Money and Buy a Gift

When I was young, it was my job to take my parents’ loose coins and put them in a money jar. Every year, about three weeks before Christmas, I would put the pennies in wrappers. Afterwards, we took a trip to the bank to exchange the coins for dollars. I took this money and bought gifts for my mom, dad, and older brother.

There are so many lessons learned within this activity such as: counting, money recognition, sorting and the purpose of banks. Another skill I learned was awareness of others. A child may buy his dad green socks because it is his favorite color or mom a cup because she loves drinking tea in the morning.

Materials Needed

 

  1. Have the child gather loose coins and put into money jar.
  2. Count coins and sort into money wrappers using the Nadex Sort and Wrap Set.
  3. Take coins to the bank or credit union and exchange for cash.
    • If you don’t have enough coins to fill wrappers, then check with your local bank about the loose coin conversion policy.
    • Some banks and credit unions convert coins into cash for customers only.
    • Some grocery stores have coin machines but will charge a fee.
    • Check out this article for more ways to convert coin into cash.                                                                                                                
  1. Brainstorm with child what family members or friends they will purchase gifts for.
  2. Have the child list the person’s interest and favorites.
  3. Make a tentative list of gifts for each member or friend.
  4. Your list may change once you go shopping.
  5. Go shopping.
  6. Help the child the wrap gifts.
  7. Watch their faces light up when family members or friends open their gift!

 

money roll 2
Inputting Coin Wrapper in Nadex Coin and Wrap Set.

 

money roll 3
Inserting the coins

 

money roll
Coin Wrapping is complete!

 

Melissa & Doug Stained Glass Race Car Ornaments 

  • Please note that you can make other items such as hearts and rainbows.

This is a simple project to make with kids. There are two cars in the kit. Kids will enjoy the experience of decorating their cars with colorful stickers. This activity also helps with spatial awareness, creativity, and focusing. This would be a great gift for children to give to  family members.

 

Materials Needed

  1. Follow directions in the Kit for the best results.
car activity 1
Just getting started

 

car activity 2
One car is complete and another left to go!

Create Your Own Christmas Cards Artwork

Instead of buying birthday cards for family members and friends, my son likes to make his own. The personal touch of a handmade card from a child is priceless. The time and effort it takes to create a masterpiece for a loved one fills their soul with joy. The person knows the child took time to make something especially for them. So why not have this same experience during the Holidays?

My son has started to make his Holiday cards already. It is a symbol of appreciation for the person’s role in his life. Your child can create their own masterpiece and present it to family and friends. They can use crayons, stickers, markers, glitter and whatever their minds come up with to decorate this card!

Happy Holidays to You!Here is the Masterpiece I Created for You!

 

holiday card 4
Creating a Masterpiece on the Holiday Card.

 

Finished Product!

 

Complete the Form Below to Download Holiday Card!

Below are details about the card…

  • Downloadable 5 x 7in postcard
  • Child can create artwork in the white rectangular space
  • Ability to type in white rectangular space with computer
  • Plenty of room for child to create artwork
  • Child can deliver or mail postcard to recipient

 

Please print and cut the postcard on 100lb card stock paper for best results.

Before you download, please know:

  • Simply Outrageous Youth Printables are for Personal Use Only
  • You may not modify, re-sell, redistribute, or claim the design as your own.
  • Please do not remove the credits/watermarks.

I hope you try some of the ideas given here. My son and I had fun doing these hands-on projects! A bonus is we learned a lot in the process!

Tell me about your holiday projects. I want to know as I am always learning!

Don’t forget to Sign Up for our FREE Course of How to Teach the Alphabet in a Fun Way!

Happy Creating and Learning!

4 Simple and Fun Pumpkin Activities for Kids

*This post contains affiliate links, which means I receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you, if you make a purchase using the links.

Pumpkin activities

Every fall, I ask myself what are simple, fun, and educational pumpkin activities to do with my son.  We attend fall festivals in our county and get at least 4 pumpkins annually. This year, I was looking for activities that DID NOT require me to purchase more craft supplies from the store. I wanted to use items that we had on hand.

Below is what we did and had a blast!

Paint The Pumpkin

Materials Needed

 

  1. Put Newspapers or cloth on table for easy clean-up
  2. Put water in cup to clean paint brushes.
  3. Put napkins in paper plate #1 to clean and dry paint brushes.
  4. Put small sections of various color paints on paper plate # 2.
  5. Place pumpkin on table with newspaper/magazine paper or cloth.
  6. Let your child be creative and paint the pumpkin.

 

paint set up
This is our set up before starting to paint.

 

Pick, Count, and Cook Pumpkin Seeds

Materials Needed

 

  1. Place pumpkin on cutting board or pan in front of child.
  2. Give the child a spoon and have them scoop out the seeds.
  3. If they are having difficulty using the spoon, have them use their hands.
  4. Instruct child to put seeds in bowl.
  5. Have the child count the seeds while scooping.
  6. Another option is for the child to count the seeds at the end of the activity.
  7. Roast the pumpkin seeds for a great snack!

 

Scooping pumpkin seeds with spoon!

 

Make Pumpkin Soup with Rice

Materials Needed

  1. Follow our Pumpkin Soup with Rice Recipe.
  2. Have fun eating it with your family!

 

Access Our Pumpkin Soup with Rice Recipe

at the bottom of this post!

 

Have a Science Lesson and Learn about Decomposition

Materials Needed (please note this activity came from Sid the Science Kid Season 1 Episode 6 called Mushy Banana)

  1. Once the painted pumpkin has started to decay put it in a large plastic bag or container.
  2. Let the pumpkin decompose until it changes colors.
  3. Put plastic gloves on the child before touching pumpkin.
  4. Stay close to the child to ensure they don’t put the pumpkin in their mouth.
  5. Have the child feel the pumpkin and compare it to a fresh pumpkin.
  6. Have the child take a closer look by using their magnifying glass.
  7. Ask the child the following questions…
  • How is the pumpkin different from the fresh pumpkin?
  • How does it smell?
  • What colors do you see?
  • How does it feel?
  1. Put Pumpkin in the compost when complete.

 

He is analyzing a decayed pumpkin!

 

We cut the pumpkin in quarters and now he examines the decayed flesh.

Don’t forget to sign up for our FREE course on How to Teach the Alphabet in a Fun Way!

Get the password for the library with Creamy Pumpkin Soup with Rice Recipe by completing this form. Once you press the GET ACCESS NOW button, we will send you an email with the password. Then go to SOY Resource Library and enter the password.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How to Introduce Multiplication to Kids in a Fun Way

*This post contains affiliate links, which means I receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you, if you make a purchase using the links.

HOW TO INTRODUCE

How to Introduce Multiplication to Kids in a Fun Way

The short story of Why I would Expose my Three-Year Old Son to Multiplication

In order to introduce multiplication to kids, you have to make it fun! My son was playing with numbers in our math set and saw the times tables sign(x). He held up the x and wanted to know what it meant. I challenged myself to explain it in a manner he could understand and I succeeded!!

A Great Children’s Book to Introduce Multiplication to Kids

About three weeks later, I went to the library and saw in the children’s section the title, 3 x 4 a Toon Book by Ivan Brunetti. I thought this comic book would be an excellent tool to further explain how multiplication works to my son.

*Bonus Tip

Go to the bottom of this post to Access 2 Hands-On Art Activities that will Explain Multiplication

The author provides colorful pictures, diverse characters, and a great storyline to introduce multiplication.

A Brief Summary

It is about a teacher who gives his students a homework assignment of drawing 12 things but in sets. A few students raise their hands and ask the teacher about various options to completing their homework. For example, one student asks, “Can I draw 3 sets of 4?”, the teacher replies, “It’s up to you!”

The story goes on to show the reader the process that each student executes to complete their homework assignment. One student likes baseball, so he draws three of each item: baseball, gloves, bats, and hats.

There is one student that needs more time to process her homework assignment. Her mom, dad, and even little brother are there to help her undertake this project. She comes up with a great idea at the end; however, you will have to read the book in order to find out what it is!

Tips for Parents and Teachers

At the end of the book, you will find tips for parents and teachers on How to Read Comics with Kids. The author explains how kids are naturally drawn to the detailed pictures in comics, which makes them want to read the words!

Read this book and provide your child with an entertaining explanation to the importance of multiplication!

What are other ways to teach multiplication tables to children?

One common way is to have children study their times tables a certain amount of time each day. This is how I learned. However, there are creative ways through play that children can learn as well.

  1. Build a number city of multiples with Legos.
    • My son saw a YOUTUBE video about counting by 3s. We built the following numbers with legos: 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, and 24,
    • We created a role play where his toy elephant’s mission was to destroy the city.
    • Every time elephant knocked down and destroyed a number, my son had to build the number up.
    • This role play provided familiarity with multiples of three.
    • Plus, my son was the city’s hero because he kept building the numbers up.
    • He did not realize he was learning while doing this activity.
multiples of 3 lego city
Multiples of  3 Lego City! Pictured here is 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15.
  1. Songs– Many people know the words to a lot of songs not because someone taught them but through hearing it repeatedly. Use this same concept with learning multiplication.

How do you learn your time tables quickly?

A great way to learn time tables quickly is through tricks. Here are some examples of tricks below…

  1. Multiples of 10 – just add a 0 to the number
    • 3 x 10 = 30 (Add 0 to 3 to make 30)
    • 4 x 10 = 40 (Add 0 to 4 to make 40)
  2.  Multiples of 11 – (double the number for number 1-9)
    • 3 x 11 = 33 (write the number 3 twice)
    • 5 x 11 = 55 (write the number 5 twice)
  3. Multiplies of 9 – (use your fingers)

Multiplication is a concept we use often in life; additionally, it is great to learn it in a fun way! Tell me how you introduce multiplication in a fun way to your child or students.

Happy Learning!

Don’t forget to Sign Up for our FREE Course of How to Teach the Alphabet in a Fun Way!

Get the password for the library with 2 Hands-On Art Activities That Will Explain Multiplication by completing this form. Once you press the GET ACCESS NOW button, we will send you an email with the password. Then go to SOY Resource Library and enter the password.

 

 

How to Explain Multiplication to a Preschooler Using Pictures

HOW I EXPLAINED MULTIPLICATIONS-2

*This post contains affiliate links, which means I receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you, if you make a purchase using the links.

Some may ask “Why would you explain multiplication to a preschooler?” I will tell you why. One day my son was playing with a math set that included numbers and symbols such as the plus, minus, equal and division signs. He likes to put the numbers in ascending and descending order. While playing, he held up the X (the multiplication sign) and asked “What is this?”

When my son asks a question, I usually challenge myself to answer it so he can understand. This time, after hearing the question, I was lost for words. I started to tell him that it’s a multiplication sign and he will learn about it once he gets older. Before uttering these words, I thought a picture would be the best way to explain this concept.

*Bonus Tip

Go to the Bottom of this Post to Get Access to A Fun Game, Using Action Figures and Stuffed Animals, That Will Explain Multiplication to Young Kids

 

Here was my process for answering the question, “What is multiplication?”

I cut a big piece of craft paper  and taped it to the wall. Then we found crayons and started our quick lesson.

Please note: In order to use this explanation, ensure your child is familiar with their numbers, counting, and shapes.

With the crayon, I wrote the problem 2×3 =. Then I asked my son to duplicate the problem using the numbers and symbols in his math set. He took the 2, 3, x, and equal sign and made the problem on the floor.

Afterwards, I told him the first number(2), tells us to draw two circles on the paper. The second number (3), tell us how many dots to put in each circle.

Then I instructed him to do the following…

  1. Draw two big circles on the paper.
  2. Put three dots in each circle.
  3. Count all the dots.
  4. You have your answer!

multiplication

Eventually he learned that multiplication is adding a number to itself a certain amount of times. So, 2×3 is the same thing as 3 +3 = 6.

We kept going over various examples, until he was able to create a problem and complete it independently. I also explained that it works inversely. You can draw three circles and put two dots in each to solve the problem. This shows that 2+2+2 = 6.

He was excited to learn something new and I was proud in my ability to explain this concept to my preschooler!

Corban multiplication
My son solving the problem 8×2 =

 

He loves writing on his V-Tech Easel.

 

corban multiplication 2
He is writing the correct answer 16.

When should kids learn multiplication?

Telling a three-year-old how multiplication works may seem too early. However, my child asked a question and I was determined to answer it. Better yet, he understood the concept through art!

Normally, children start learning multiplication in the 2nd or 3rd grades. I remember learning it in the 3rd grade. However, younger children can learn how multiplication works if you explain it to them in a way they understand.

Complete the form below and get started with this fun game.

Have Fun Learning!

Don’t forget to Sign Up for our Free Course on How to Teach the Alphabet in a Fun Way!

Get the password for the library with A Fun Game, Using Action Figures and Stuffed Animals, That Will Explain Multiplication to Young Kids by completing this form. Once you press the GET ACCESS NOW button, we will send you an email with the password. Then go to SOY Resource Library and enter the password.

 

How to Teach Alphabet Recognition in a Fun Way!

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HOW TO TEACH ALPHABET RECOGNITION IN A FUN WAY

How to Teach Alphabet Recognition in a Fun Way

Some parents have concerns about teaching their child alphabet recognition. The big question is, “Where do I start with teaching my child the alphabet?” I’ve heard some parents say, “My child will not sit long enough to learn it.” Others are laid back and depend on their child’s teacher to handle this task.

Then I’ve talked to teachers who are able to teach their whole class alphabet recognition with no problem. Other teachers find it difficult to teach when they have many children in their class on different levels. These are the teachers who find it helpful if parents work with their child at home in addition to school.

I understand, as a mother, this can be an overwhelming task because it is one of the first concepts children will learn. As a result of hearing from parents and teachers, I decided to teach my child the alphabet in a fun and relaxing manner.

Many parents have the following questions about learning the alphabet…

When should a child recognize letters of the alphabet?

It is important to look at your local school district’s kindergarten program of studies. Our school district teaches kindergarteners to identify and name the upper-and-lower case letters of the alphabet. If you have a child that needs more time with alphabet recognition, then they may fall behind in class if you don’t work with them at home. I think it is safe for them to know it before starting kindergarten.

My son learned the alphabet at 18 months through play. I didn’t expect him to learn them until the age of three or four. When you teach it through fun learning methods, the child will want to learn more and more about the alphabet.

Should you teach letter names or sounds first?

Many people have different philosophies about whether to teach letter names or sounds first. I did it simultaneously. When my son was an infant, I would sing the Alphabet song to him with the sounds included. We played with soft alphabet blocks and I would identify the letter and the sounds associated with them. I also played songs, with a catchy beat, in the car with letter identification and phonics.

What are the steps to teach phonics?

Using play, songs, and books is a great way to teach phonics. Anytime my son and I read an alphabet book or played with an alphabet toy, we identified the letters and sounds (long and short sounds). Various books, songs, and toys that interest him were chosen to expose my son to the alphabet. I never wanted him to get bored with learning the alphabet using only one method. When a child is exposed to the alphabet and their sounds in various fun ways and methods, the learning becomes inevitable.

Once my son knew all the phonics, I showed him how to use them to sound out words like cat or pot. I also read books to him and played with puzzles and word games that included those same words for diverse repetition. Then I got him magnetic letters and asked him if he could spell words like bag or nut. When I said the words, I would slowly enunciate each letter sound so he could successfully spell it.

How do you teach the alphabet?

Before exposing my child to the alphabet, I did research on how to teach children through wholesome and playful learning. I applied my findings during playtime with my child and found that this teaching method works! Worksheets or flashcards were not used to initially teach my son alphabet recognition. They were incorporated after he knew them.

I used fun learning methods to teach the alphabet. This includes singing, dancing, painting, and using toys such as play doh to form the letters of the alphabet. There are so many ways to make it fun. I want to share with you what I have learned and experienced through a FREE Mini Course on How To Teach Alphabet Recognition in a Fun Way!

You may have a child that knows the alphabet, phonics, and is able to read. This FREE course is also for you. The principles taught in the course can be applied to almost ANY NEW CONCEPT you want your child to learn.

This method was used to teach my son…

  • Basic Social and Hygiene Skills
  • Life Skills
  • Colors
  • Shapes
  • Write
  • Read
  • Tell Time
  • The Planets and their functions
  • Alphabet and Numbers in Spanish
  • Addition and Subtraction

I could go on but you get the picture.

This course provides the following…

  • Over 100 Tips, Activities, and Resources
  • Tips for the Child who loses Interest in Learning the Alphabet
  • How to Tailor lessons to your child’s pace
  • How to change your mind set about learning and teaching
  • The three basic learning styles in children
  • How to determine your child’s learning style
  • How to expose children to new concepts aligned with their learning style
  • How children with certain learning styles tend to communicate
  • The toys/activities children with certain learning styles tend to favor
  • How to make learning fun and playful for children
  • How to determine the best time to teach your child
  • How to execute Fun In-Depth Learning
  • How to use the 5 senses to teach your child
  • How to combine In-depth learning and learning styles during play
  • How to incorporate digital media in your child’s learning
  • How to teach a child with more than one learning style
  • How to Structure your Day
  • How to progress to teaching your child the phonics
  • How to track your child’s progress
  • Daily thought-provoking assignments to hold you accountable

 

HOW DOES THIS MINI-COURSE WORK?

Just sign up for the FREE mini-course with the form at the bottom of this post. You will receive  DAILY emails for 16 days with useful information, tips, tools, and an assignment.

You will receive your first email shortly after joining! Remember, it’s free!

YOU CAN DO THIS! I am here to help and guide you. The daily emails serve as positive reminders to encourage you to take small action steps.

I look forward to sharing my knowledge with you. Please share your progress with me as well!

Have Fun Learning!

 

Read Aloud Strategies – How to Make Books Come Alive for Kids

*This post contains affiliate links, which means I receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you, if you make a purchase using the links.

READING ALOUD STRATEGIES-2

Reading aloud to my son is a sacred time within our household. I usually read before nap and bed time. It seems to create a serene atmosphere before rest. Then there are times when reading makes us animated! These types of stories may include characters experiencing adventures where they are running, jumping or kicking and on their way to solve a big problem!

My goal is to read so my son feels like he is in the story. I have learned that there is an art to reading aloud.  Below is what I have found…

*Bonus Tip

Go to the bottom of this post to get access to the 10 Types of Books to Choose When Reading Aloud to Kids

 

Pick Books that Interest Them (or you think would interest them)

I try to pick books that my son can relate to or find interesting. I gravitate toward books with characters that look like him. Also books about cars, racing, sports, nature, animals, numbers, alphabet, and space spark his curiosity. Interacting and observing him assists me in finding books he will connect to. One day,  he asked me how water comes into our home. This led me to getting a book about how the home works. Try to get books that answer your child’s questions to further their understanding of a topic.

Better yet, Let Them Choose their Own Books

It is so much easier for my son to pick books out for himself. I usually take him to the library or the local book store and let him skim the book titles until he finds what he wants. Sometimes, he goes in the library knowing what he wants and is on a mission to find it. We find the books by inputting keywords in the computerized catalogue. When we sit down to read, the first book he usually chooses is the one he just found!

Voice Changes for Different Characters

Changing your voice for different characters is very entertaining for children. It can also be fun for the parent!  If I am reading a male character, I will lower my tone. If I am reading a character that is a monster, then my voice gets raspy.  Be creative and have fun practicing various character voices!

Emphasize Emotions and Actions

We read lots books with animal characters and I usually make their sounds or physical gestures that represent them. Also, if there is a quiet section in the book, then I lower my voice to set the mood. When there is an onomatopoeia like the word “Pop” and “Boom,” I get very loud and will hit my hand on the floor to make the sound.

Ask Kids about their Predictions

During reading time, I ask my son what he thinks will happen. This gets him engaged in the story. He also wants to know if his prediction is correct.

Listen to Audio Books

While riding in the car, my son and I will listen to audio books. The narrators are highly skilled in their changing voices and emphasizing emotions and actions. Listen to these books and you will learn a lot!

Another Bonus Tip

Here is video of a speech therapist, Adrienne, on How to Get Toddlers to Sit and Read With You. I have learned a lot from her as well!

Make reading interesting to your child and most of all, have fun with it!

Happy Reading!

Don’t forget to Sign Up for Free Course on How to Teach the Alphabet in a Fun Way!

Get the password for the library with 10 Types of Books to Choose When Reading Aloud to Kids by completing this form.Once you press the GET ACCESS NOW button, we will send you an email with the password. Then go to SOY Resource Library and enter the password.